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Edly's Music Theory for Practical People

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Called "somewhere between Dr. Suess and PC for Dummies," Edly's Music Theory for Practical People is for anyone, teen to adult, who wants to enjoy learning what's going on inside music. This includes players and singers of any level desiring a deeper appreciation of music-- rock 'n' rollers wanting broader musical horizons, jazzers needing more knowledge of chords and scal Called "somewhere between Dr. Suess and PC for Dummies," Edly's Music Theory for Practical People is for anyone, teen to adult, who wants to enjoy learning what's going on inside music. This includes players and singers of any level desiring a deeper appreciation of music-- rock 'n' rollers wanting broader musical horizons, jazzers needing more knowledge of chords and scales, theory students needing supplementary help, or classically trained folks wanting to branch into popular styles or to read from fake books. The book begins simply - and at the beginning, reassuring and encouraging the reader through topics including modes, chord substitution, transposition, and much more. Each topic is accompanied by an explanation of what it is, how it's used, and why it is helpful. Berklee and Juilliard faculty endorsed.


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Called "somewhere between Dr. Suess and PC for Dummies," Edly's Music Theory for Practical People is for anyone, teen to adult, who wants to enjoy learning what's going on inside music. This includes players and singers of any level desiring a deeper appreciation of music-- rock 'n' rollers wanting broader musical horizons, jazzers needing more knowledge of chords and scal Called "somewhere between Dr. Suess and PC for Dummies," Edly's Music Theory for Practical People is for anyone, teen to adult, who wants to enjoy learning what's going on inside music. This includes players and singers of any level desiring a deeper appreciation of music-- rock 'n' rollers wanting broader musical horizons, jazzers needing more knowledge of chords and scales, theory students needing supplementary help, or classically trained folks wanting to branch into popular styles or to read from fake books. The book begins simply - and at the beginning, reassuring and encouraging the reader through topics including modes, chord substitution, transposition, and much more. Each topic is accompanied by an explanation of what it is, how it's used, and why it is helpful. Berklee and Juilliard faculty endorsed.

30 review for Edly's Music Theory for Practical People

  1. 4 out of 5

    Spike Gomes

    I've had this book for awhile, and while I've used it as a reference, I decided to read it cover to cover. It was originally recommended to me from a musician's forum, as one of the better books on music theory. Indeed it is pretty good, with some caveats. 1. This book is for people with a beginner to intermediate level understanding of music theory. It's not really the best introduction for someone with zero experience with music because it demands that you understand certain key things right o I've had this book for awhile, and while I've used it as a reference, I decided to read it cover to cover. It was originally recommended to me from a musician's forum, as one of the better books on music theory. Indeed it is pretty good, with some caveats. 1. This book is for people with a beginner to intermediate level understanding of music theory. It's not really the best introduction for someone with zero experience with music because it demands that you understand certain key things right off the bat. 2. It sticks to pretty much what it says on the label. You're not going to get anything discussing time and rhythm here, like in most books of basic music theory, even though technically it's outside the purview. 3. It moves fast. After each chapter, do the exercises, and then go and woodshed it out with your particular instrument (which might be a bit tricky for folks playing non-chordophone instruments. This book is more about application of music theory than really having a high end understanding of it. 4. If you're like me, much of the book is a bit of an intellectual exercise. I'm just trying to understand enough to create a melody and harmonize a simple song. This book gives you enough of a grounding that with work, you can wrap your mind around the jazziest of chords and basic improvisational playing. That's more than I needed, but nice to know, nonetheless. 5. Probably, the only real downside for me, is that this book is really made for aspiring musicians and not songwriters looking for ways of figuring out an interesting melody and harmonizing to it. However, if you're just in it to jam, know what you're jamming, and how to figure out how to play a new song quickly and then embellish it to make it your own interpretation, then this is the music theory book for you. In summation, if I had to pick one book on music theory, this one wouldn't be it, but if I were to create a list of ten books to recommend, it certainly would be on the list of "must-haves".

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vish Singh

    Here's a blurb from my blog, where I wrote about this book before joining Goodreads: This book has been recommended several times by a Talkbass member named JTE. I didn’t look into it until the other night because I have Music Theory for Dummies downstairs, and Bass Guitar for Dummies upstairs. Well, I found it online and realized that I leafed through this years ago at Barnes & Noble, but didn’t buy it then, because I didn’t yet know what music theory was or how it applied to bass. I thought, at Here's a blurb from my blog, where I wrote about this book before joining Goodreads: This book has been recommended several times by a Talkbass member named JTE. I didn’t look into it until the other night because I have Music Theory for Dummies downstairs, and Bass Guitar for Dummies upstairs. Well, I found it online and realized that I leafed through this years ago at Barnes & Noble, but didn’t buy it then, because I didn’t yet know what music theory was or how it applied to bass. I thought, at the time, that I needed to look at bass-specific books (how-to-play). Now that I’ve read more, I can understand its value. Even more, I looked at some of the inside contents on the author’s website and really like how its presented, so I grabbed it. Amazingly, Amazon shipped it yesterday, and its supposed to arrive today. Its travelling halfway around the country to get here in what I consider record time. ---------- After having gone through the book, I can say that it illustrates many music theory topics in memorable, evocative ways which help to enable understanding and recall of the topics. I really enjoy Edly's way of writing and would recommend this as a companion book to any musical method book that a student/learner uses for general instruction. ---------- A link to my original blog entry can be found here: http://uglybass.wordpress.com/2011/10...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    For a few years, I got to teach a very fun (at least to me...) theory course to college freshman who needed a little extra something to get their formal musical skills in order—nothing too crazy. Just enough so that they were comfortable reading music and thinking about form, melody and contour, expressions and meaning—skills that I truly believe most people already have, even if they don't have the formal vocabulary to explain it. I tried several different popular theory books and never actuall For a few years, I got to teach a very fun (at least to me...) theory course to college freshman who needed a little extra something to get their formal musical skills in order—nothing too crazy. Just enough so that they were comfortable reading music and thinking about form, melody and contour, expressions and meaning—skills that I truly believe most people already have, even if they don't have the formal vocabulary to explain it. I tried several different popular theory books and never actually settled on one, though I did use this one two years in a row. It covers all the basics (just as Music Theory for Dummies does), has a light-hearted voice (same), and included some workbook exercises in each chapter (a nice touch). The explanations are concise enough to not be overwhelming and there are some very charming illustrations. In the end, however, I don't recall this book standing out any more than any other similar theory book. It works just fine.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    In trying to figure out a more exciting way to teach music theory, this book intrigued me. As I went through it I was reminded of things that I had forgotten and got some ideas to use in my teaching. It was very worthwile.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    Fabulous practical book on theory

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bob Browder

  7. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  8. 4 out of 5

    Guy Vestal - Counter Culture Critic

  9. 4 out of 5

    ElH

  10. 4 out of 5

    William T. Mathews

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  13. 4 out of 5

    Doug Alcorn

  14. 4 out of 5

    Barry Graubart

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chad

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jack

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth von Teig

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kevin C.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jack Meyer

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lynette Staswick

  22. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Armstrong

  23. 5 out of 5

    Peter and Kelly Gerber

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brian Corrigan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Catlow

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paul Turcotte

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robgonzo

  28. 4 out of 5

    Scott Sharp

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michael P Sturgeon

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Ransley

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