Hot Best Seller

Sub Pop USA: The Subterraneanan Pop Music Anthology, 1980–1988

Availability: Ready to download

In 1979, Bruce Pavitt moved to Olympia, WA, and began programming a show called Subterranean Pop on local community radio station KAOS-FM. Inspired by Olympia’s guide to independent music, OP Magazine, Pavitt launched a fanzine version of Subterranean Pop, focusing on music with a punk, new wave, and experimental bent. Calvin Johnson of K Records joined the fanzine’s staff In 1979, Bruce Pavitt moved to Olympia, WA, and began programming a show called Subterranean Pop on local community radio station KAOS-FM. Inspired by Olympia’s guide to independent music, OP Magazine, Pavitt launched a fanzine version of Subterranean Pop, focusing on music with a punk, new wave, and experimental bent. Calvin Johnson of K Records joined the fanzine’s staff in 1980, beginning with the second issue. Driven by the power of independent thinking, the Sub Pop zine’s particular field of interest was artists from the Midwest and Northwest. Punk and new wave fans in major cities were puzzled, surprised that there were enough bands in those regions to devote a column, let alone an entire fanzine. Even more puzzling was the exclusion of artists like the Clash, Gang of Four, Blondie, or PIL, solely because of their major label associations. Early issues featured impassioned rallying cries for local action that make more sense than ever today, alongside early published artwork by Linda Barry, Charles Burns, and Jad Fair. From Beat Happening and Pell Mell to early records by the Beastie Boys, Metallica, and Run DMC, Sub Pop was a 1980s independent music bible, written with a diverse appreciation for happening scenes across the USA. In 1986, Pavitt put his ideas into practice, launching Sub Pop Records with the historic Sub Pop 100 compilation and Soundgarden’s first release. While the Sub Pop Records legacy is today legendary, the groundwork and creative wellspring that put Seattle on the musical map is assembled here for the first time.


Compare

In 1979, Bruce Pavitt moved to Olympia, WA, and began programming a show called Subterranean Pop on local community radio station KAOS-FM. Inspired by Olympia’s guide to independent music, OP Magazine, Pavitt launched a fanzine version of Subterranean Pop, focusing on music with a punk, new wave, and experimental bent. Calvin Johnson of K Records joined the fanzine’s staff In 1979, Bruce Pavitt moved to Olympia, WA, and began programming a show called Subterranean Pop on local community radio station KAOS-FM. Inspired by Olympia’s guide to independent music, OP Magazine, Pavitt launched a fanzine version of Subterranean Pop, focusing on music with a punk, new wave, and experimental bent. Calvin Johnson of K Records joined the fanzine’s staff in 1980, beginning with the second issue. Driven by the power of independent thinking, the Sub Pop zine’s particular field of interest was artists from the Midwest and Northwest. Punk and new wave fans in major cities were puzzled, surprised that there were enough bands in those regions to devote a column, let alone an entire fanzine. Even more puzzling was the exclusion of artists like the Clash, Gang of Four, Blondie, or PIL, solely because of their major label associations. Early issues featured impassioned rallying cries for local action that make more sense than ever today, alongside early published artwork by Linda Barry, Charles Burns, and Jad Fair. From Beat Happening and Pell Mell to early records by the Beastie Boys, Metallica, and Run DMC, Sub Pop was a 1980s independent music bible, written with a diverse appreciation for happening scenes across the USA. In 1986, Pavitt put his ideas into practice, launching Sub Pop Records with the historic Sub Pop 100 compilation and Soundgarden’s first release. While the Sub Pop Records legacy is today legendary, the groundwork and creative wellspring that put Seattle on the musical map is assembled here for the first time.

30 review for Sub Pop USA: The Subterraneanan Pop Music Anthology, 1980–1988

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hubert Taler

    Get it on paper and read it if you’re interested in independent music history. It’s beautifully edited and fascinating.

  2. 5 out of 5

    K.

    Good, reinforced: The Embarrassment Good, discovered: Nervous Gender, No Trend, Go Team, "Prime Numbers" by Cheri Knight GREAT, DISCOVERED: THE BUMPER CROP BY PELL MELL!!!!, THE ZOMBIES OF MORA-TAU BY JAD FAIR!!!!! **** Two nights ago I awoke from a dream saying "54-40 - Tsawwassen's finest." Good, reinforced: The Embarrassment Good, discovered: Nervous Gender, No Trend, Go Team, "Prime Numbers" by Cheri Knight GREAT, DISCOVERED: THE BUMPER CROP BY PELL MELL!!!!, THE ZOMBIES OF MORA-TAU BY JAD FAIR!!!!! **** Two nights ago I awoke from a dream saying "54-40 - Tsawwassen's finest."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lara Seven

    fun trip down memory lane, with the original zine on one page and an easier-to read typeset page next to it. Would have gotten a higher rating but for the recurrent cut and paste error throughout book where "Butthole Surfers" is replaced by a space and bolded comma. fun trip down memory lane, with the original zine on one page and an easier-to read typeset page next to it. Would have gotten a higher rating but for the recurrent cut and paste error throughout book where "Butthole Surfers" is replaced by a space and bolded comma.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Vigrass

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gareth Kay

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris Estey

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  8. 5 out of 5

    Steve Davidson

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ian MacKinnon

  10. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

  11. 5 out of 5

    Fausto

  12. 5 out of 5

    Charlie McEvily

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mickey Kowaleski

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Dinkha

  15. 4 out of 5

    Punyhuman

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bazillion Points

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paulo

  18. 5 out of 5

    Riley Fitzgerald

  19. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Herb

  21. 5 out of 5

    flo

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Detroit

  23. 5 out of 5

    Spenser

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Calaman

  25. 5 out of 5

    Carella Ross

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jordan McLelland

  27. 4 out of 5

    christopher

  28. 4 out of 5

    Phinehas

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ian King

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...