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Good News for Weary Women: Escaping the Bondage of To-Do Lists, Steps, and Bad Advice

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Are you exhausted? Women today really do feel the weight of the world on their shoulders. Every morning we are greeted with a long list of to-dos: get the kids up and out the door on time, have a meaningful quiet time, put in a full day at the office, spend an hour at the gym, prepare a healthy and delicious meal (organic and locally grown, of course), and make sure the si Are you exhausted? Women today really do feel the weight of the world on their shoulders. Every morning we are greeted with a long list of to-dos: get the kids up and out the door on time, have a meaningful quiet time, put in a full day at the office, spend an hour at the gym, prepare a healthy and delicious meal (organic and locally grown, of course), and make sure the sink sparkles before you go to bed. Oh, and don't forget to look great and smile while you're doing it. These are all good things to do, of course. But the bigger problem occurs when we start to feel as if our worth is measured by our to-do lists. And the messages we receive at church, on Facebook, and from the media only perpetuate these unrealistic expectations, creating a relentless cycle of exhaustion. As Elyse Fitzpatrick has traveled this country, she has seen increasing evidence of this weariness epidemic invading our churches and communities. And she has good news for women everywhere: there is hope! God doesn't judge us by our to-do lists. Instead, He calls us to faith. Free yourself today from the endless stream of bad advice and discover the true rest God offers.


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Are you exhausted? Women today really do feel the weight of the world on their shoulders. Every morning we are greeted with a long list of to-dos: get the kids up and out the door on time, have a meaningful quiet time, put in a full day at the office, spend an hour at the gym, prepare a healthy and delicious meal (organic and locally grown, of course), and make sure the si Are you exhausted? Women today really do feel the weight of the world on their shoulders. Every morning we are greeted with a long list of to-dos: get the kids up and out the door on time, have a meaningful quiet time, put in a full day at the office, spend an hour at the gym, prepare a healthy and delicious meal (organic and locally grown, of course), and make sure the sink sparkles before you go to bed. Oh, and don't forget to look great and smile while you're doing it. These are all good things to do, of course. But the bigger problem occurs when we start to feel as if our worth is measured by our to-do lists. And the messages we receive at church, on Facebook, and from the media only perpetuate these unrealistic expectations, creating a relentless cycle of exhaustion. As Elyse Fitzpatrick has traveled this country, she has seen increasing evidence of this weariness epidemic invading our churches and communities. And she has good news for women everywhere: there is hope! God doesn't judge us by our to-do lists. Instead, He calls us to faith. Free yourself today from the endless stream of bad advice and discover the true rest God offers.

30 review for Good News for Weary Women: Escaping the Bondage of To-Do Lists, Steps, and Bad Advice

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

    Every woman feels the pressure to be perfect, or at least as close to perfect as we can possibly get. Keep the house clean, the children obedient, and the family fed nutritious meals while gathered at the dinner table for quality time every night. When we inevitably fall short of these demands, we feel we have failed and resolve to try harder tomorrow, only to repeat the cycle of failure yet again the next day. However, we need to realize that most of these expectations that we just cannot measu Every woman feels the pressure to be perfect, or at least as close to perfect as we can possibly get. Keep the house clean, the children obedient, and the family fed nutritious meals while gathered at the dinner table for quality time every night. When we inevitably fall short of these demands, we feel we have failed and resolve to try harder tomorrow, only to repeat the cycle of failure yet again the next day. However, we need to realize that most of these expectations that we just cannot measure up to are the world’s demands, the church’s, or even our own hearts’. They are not Jesus’ expectations for us; in fact, everything we need to do, He has already done for us. That is the good news of the Gospel, and that is the good news that Elyse M. Fitzpatrick is trying to share with us in her book: “It’s time to trust in Christ—and Christ alone! He has already done it all.” When I first picked up this book, I was not connecting the “good news” in the title to the Gospel. Christians know that Gospel means “good news,” but it did not yet resonate for me that it was not just the good news of my eternal salvation she is talking about here, but also the good news that I do not have to keep jumping through myriad hoops to be pleasing to God. I was expecting another list of how to succeed in the Christian woman’s life without killing myself in the process. But those kind of lists are exactly what the author argues against, saying we do not need another “how to” book; instead we need to trust that Jesus has provided all we need to be sufficient in the eyes of the Father. We are pleasing in God’s sight right now because when He looks at us, He sees us through the Son who obeyed perfectly in our place. At first, I did not really like this book at all; in fact, it offended me in multiple places. Fitzpatrick spends a great deal of time telling us that we do not have to try to fit into the mold that the conservative backlash against feminism has tried to force us into. I do not feel as if I have been coerced into any role; I am doing what I believe God has called me to do. She talks extensively about the stay-at-home mom, saying that position has been “elevated to the greatest expression of godliness for a woman.” Even the way she phrased this and the surrounding paragraphs felt like an attack on those of us “blessed with husbands and uteruses” who choose to remain in the home to care for the family we’ve been given. I realize that women have often been criticized for remaining in the workforce when they did not have to, but it felt like I was being chastised for staying at home because I could and felt led to do so. Her style is a bit caustic at times, and can be offensive, especially if the reader finds herself on the other end of the opinion spectrum. As I got further into the book, however, it started resonating with me. I could see her point in the many ways we try to be acceptable in God’s sight by doing what others have told us will make us a better Christian woman. It also helped that once she had established what she saw as the source of our weariness, those never ending lists imposed on us by anyone other than God, the tone of the book seemed to moderate a bit as she focused on the solution: Jesus is our sufficiency and we are justified through Him alone. Perhaps the best piece of advice in this book is her counsel that when I am told I should be doing something, I need to ask, “Is this something Jesus would say to me?” This one question has the potential to bring clarity to many issues in a woman’s life and it quickly cuts to the core of any well-meaning advice I may be offered. Stunningly, she points out that when we impose demands on others, or ourselves, outside of what Scripture tells us, we “play right into Satan’s hands [who] wants us to believe that God is too demanding and that we’ll never be able to please Him, so we might as well just give up.” This defeat will not produce a life of joy or peace, just weariness in trying to accomplish an impossible task. This book gave me much to consider. I did not always like it, it made me uncomfortable at times, but I really caused me to examine my motivation for why I do what I do: am I trying to please God, or men? If the answer is men, it cannot be done. And if I’m trying to please God, He has already declared me acceptable through the blood of His Son—I’m justified through Him, not by anything I do or refrain from doing. He wants me to live a life of obedience to what He has called me to out of a grateful heart, full of love for my Savior and others. I received a complimentary electronic copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for this honest opinion.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paula Vince

    This is a wonderful resource for those of us who wear ourselves out with anxiety about measuring up to whatever the world tells us we should be doing. We are anxious to perceive clear callings in our lives, and then carry them out. But when asked directly what we must be busy with to be sure we're doing the work of God, Jesus replied that our only work is to believe in Him whom God sent (John 6:29, backed up later by Acts 16: 30-31). In the light of all the to-do lists, hard work, people pleasin This is a wonderful resource for those of us who wear ourselves out with anxiety about measuring up to whatever the world tells us we should be doing. We are anxious to perceive clear callings in our lives, and then carry them out. But when asked directly what we must be busy with to be sure we're doing the work of God, Jesus replied that our only work is to believe in Him whom God sent (John 6:29, backed up later by Acts 16: 30-31). In the light of all the to-do lists, hard work, people pleasing and guilt-trips we put ourselves through, I think this has the potential to be as radical now as it must have been when He said it, if only we slow down long enough to let the repercussions sink in. Elyse Fitzpatrick explains that we sadly live in a Christian culture which is essentially the same as the world around us, based on a 'what goes around comes around' principle. We have the programmed belief that if we do good things, God is obligated to bless us, and if we do bad, He'll punish us. This, she says, is nothing more than karma dressed in a Christian dress. I've been sucked into the performance mode, and found this book's emphasis on the free gift of grace most refreshing. The New Testament stance of boasting in our weaknesses and knowing that Jesus' righteousness covers us is something we rattle off, but is so counter-cultural to the way we truly think. We need the reminder that we are free to boast only in the truth, that we are loved by God. All the law we must obey has already been obeyed by Jesus on our behalf. It's such a needless burden to think that our identity is derived from our actions and others' approval. This book has got me all set to believe that God is as good, powerful, wise, loving and friendly toward me as He says He is, and relax at last. Why listen to the voice of guilt when forgiveness has been freely granted? It's crazy! The book has its share of quotes which get straight to the point. 'Something must occupy the centre of our lives, and if it isn't the strong medicine of the Good News, it will be the poison of stupid rules,' Fitzpatrick tells us. 'Will we trust human strategies of self-rescue or prophetic promises of divine grace?' Finally, we all need to remind ourselves that we who believe in God's Son, receive the same benediction He received. 'You are my beloved son or daughter. With you, I am well pleased.' Thanks to Net Galley and Tyndale House for my review copy.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    3.5 stars- overall pretty good, but the book could probably have been 1/2 the length because of repetitiveness.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Deon

    "Are you exhausted? Women today really do feel the weight of the world on their shoulders." Elyse shows in this book that it is not through checklists and rules. She shows women their highest calling: to believe in and love the gospel and then to live our lives in the light of all Jesus has already done for us. Elyse is so honest in this book. It was if we were sitting across the table and she wanted to share her heart with me. The book was inspired out of responses to a request she posted on "Are you exhausted? Women today really do feel the weight of the world on their shoulders." Elyse shows in this book that it is not through checklists and rules. She shows women their highest calling: to believe in and love the gospel and then to live our lives in the light of all Jesus has already done for us. Elyse is so honest in this book. It was if we were sitting across the table and she wanted to share her heart with me. The book was inspired out of responses to a request she posted on Facebook: "I'd like to know the dumbest things people tell women they have to do in order to be godly." Through the book she posts the responses she received to this. It was heart-breaking to read them. To sum it up women were needing to create extremely PERFECT lives in order to be godly. Women are believing these and are exhausted and incomplete when they fail. At the end of these sections she gave some good news. Such as "Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest." Matthew 11:28 She also encourages women to be real. "Live your life transparently so other women will see that Jesus loves the weak, the weary, the wounded, and the sinner, and perhaps they, too will be emboldened to stop faking it." This book was very encouraging for me. I recommend this book for any woman and especially for women book studies.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    A fabulous book. Meeting with a variety women on a regular basis has me believe that Elyse is onto it when she calls us 'weary.' When, how and what we should feed our babies, how we should care for our environment, how we should relate in our community, what activities our kids should be involved in, where we should spend our money, what we should do with our time, what we shouldn't eat, what we should eat... There are many expectations in all areas of life that plague us as we seek to live 'goo A fabulous book. Meeting with a variety women on a regular basis has me believe that Elyse is onto it when she calls us 'weary.' When, how and what we should feed our babies, how we should care for our environment, how we should relate in our community, what activities our kids should be involved in, where we should spend our money, what we should do with our time, what we shouldn't eat, what we should eat... There are many expectations in all areas of life that plague us as we seek to live 'good' lives or a 'balanced' life. This book calls us to examine these expectation, to see them for what they are, and to see the freedom held out to us in the gospel. It truly is good news for a weary woman.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

    Overall, this book would be very helpful for someone who was raised in an oppressive church culture or who is new to the idea that our identity is fully found in Jesus. However, I found this book highly repetitive and, while I'm far from perfect in remembering who I am in Christ, I didn't think this book gave me any "a-ha" moments. Overall, this book would be very helpful for someone who was raised in an oppressive church culture or who is new to the idea that our identity is fully found in Jesus. However, I found this book highly repetitive and, while I'm far from perfect in remembering who I am in Christ, I didn't think this book gave me any "a-ha" moments.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

    I enjoyed this book! The message is basically to get over the unreasonable to do lists and rely on Jesus. Not disregarding your family and work, but in his enabling power and for his glory, not people's approval. I enjoyed this book! The message is basically to get over the unreasonable to do lists and rely on Jesus. Not disregarding your family and work, but in his enabling power and for his glory, not people's approval.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    As soon as I saw Good News For Weary Women: Escaping The Bondage Of To-do Lists, Steps, and Bad Advice by Elyse M. Fitzpatrick I knew I wanted to read it right away, just based off the title! The description immediately resonated with me: "Are you exhausted? Women today really do feel the weight of the world on their shoulders. Every morning we are greeted with a long list of to-dos: get the kids up and out the door on time, have a meaningful quiet time, put in a full day at the office, spend an As soon as I saw Good News For Weary Women: Escaping The Bondage Of To-do Lists, Steps, and Bad Advice by Elyse M. Fitzpatrick I knew I wanted to read it right away, just based off the title! The description immediately resonated with me: "Are you exhausted? Women today really do feel the weight of the world on their shoulders. Every morning we are greeted with a long list of to-dos: get the kids up and out the door on time, have a meaningful quiet time, put in a full day at the office, spend an hour at the gym, prepare a healthy and delicious meal (organic and locally grown, of course), and make sure the sink sparkles before you go to bed. Oh, and don’t forget to look great and smile while you’re doing it. These are all good things to do, of course. But the bigger problem occurs when we start to feel as if our worth is measured by our to-do lists. And the messages we receive at church, on Facebook, and from the media only perpetuate these unrealistic expectations, creating a relentless cycle of exhaustion. As Elyse Fitzpatrick has traveled this country, she has seen increasing evidence of this weariness epidemic invading our churches and communities. And she has good news for women everywhere: there is hope! God doesn’t judge us by our to-do lists. Instead, He calls us to faith. Free yourself today from the endless stream of bad advice and discover the true rest God offers." Can you relate to this? What woman doesn't, really?! I loved this book. Written Bible study style with questions for reflection and discussion included at the end of each chapter, Elise offers an introduction, 8 chapters whose topics include: How Did We End Up Here?; What Ever Happened To The Good News?; Laws, Rules, Steps, And More Bad News; When Rules Define You; The Delusion Of Self-Perfection; Who Is Your God?; He Said Us!; and What's On His List For You Today?, and two Appendixes. Elyse writes straight to the heart of every woman, cutting through Pharisaical rules and regulations and bringing us back to what really matters: knowing and loving Jesus. Written in a loving way, woman-to-woman, Elyse touched my heart and made me do some serious soul-searching. Reminiscent of Having A Mary Heart In A Martha World and A Mary Spirit by Joanna Weaver, I recommend this book to every Christian woman who is feeling overwhelmed and stressed in her multifaceted roles as wife, mother, Christian, homemaker, church leader, and more. Truly, I can't say enough good things about this book. The author has provided me with an excerpt for you to read, and I'd like to share it with you: I have a daughter, two daughters-in-law,and two granddaughters, and if there is anything I want them to know, it is this: There is good news for you. You don’t need to learn secret steps, try harder and harder, wear yourself out in an attempt to be beautiful, snag Mr. Perfect, or raise perfect children. You are already welcomed, loved, forgiven, and completely okay. You can laugh and rest and resist all the ways the world lies to you and tells you you’re not good enough. And you can love God because He has already loved you. You can be free to fail, to rest, to love, to be weak, to grow, and to know that everything is already given to you in Him. I know that women (and men) have been overwhelmed by to-do lists, steps, and bad advice since the beginning of time. Even five hundred years ago, Martin Luther didn’t need to read his Facebook friends’ posts about their having fun without him to realize that there was something wanting in his life. He was aware of his inability to obey God’s law from the heart, and he knew he didn’t have his own self-approval, let alone God’s. But I do think there is something a little more desperate, more frenetic about our present wilderness. There are so many messages being broadcast at us from every direction about “How to be perfect in 149 simple steps” or “How your life will become a self-inflicted Armageddon if you don’t follow these rules.” As a woman who loves Christ, the gospel, her family, her church, and her country, I’m standing up to scream, “Stop this madness! Be done with the fluff, the bricks, and the despair-breeding, anxiety-multiplying self-righteousness! It’s time to trust in Christ—and Christ alone! He has already done it all. Everything you need has already been given to you.” Or in the words of the writer to the Hebrews, “Whoever has entered God’s rest has also rested from his works as God did from his. Let us therefore strive to enter that rest” (Hebrews 4:10‑11). Instead of freeing me to love and serve Christ and my family, all this “good advice” loaded me down with guilt and shame over my ongoing sin and piled on more and more wearisome rules. The very thing I was taking as an antidote for my failure was making me more and more ill. Instead of finding freedom, I was a slave to self-justification. And judging from what I’ve heard from other women, I don’t think I’m the only one who has ingested this poisonous brew. The problem comes when women (and men) haven’t learned how to differentiate between law and gospel—when we don’t understand how the good news of Jesus’ perfect life, death, resurrection, ascension, and reign is meant to impact us. When we don’t see the connection between the righteous life Jesus lived and our standing before a holy God, we are setting ourselves up for bondage. Many women don’t understand the freedom that has been purchased for us, and we often get tangled up in legalism or moralism. We don’t know what it would look like for obedience to be motivated by gratitude. I believe there are specific instructions in Scripture regarding gender roles, including those in Genesis 2–3, Proverbs 31, Ephesians 5, 1 Timothy 2, Titus 2, and 1 Peter 3. I believe that these truths remain valid for today and that we ignore them to our great harm. But I also believe that much of what has been dished out to women under the guise of “biblical gender roles” has failed us in at least two ways. It has gone way beyond Scripture’s bounds, while at the same time closing off much of the Bible’s message of comfort and hope. In these ways, much of this teaching resembles Jesus’ description of the Pharisees’, for it gathers unnecessarily heavy burdens and lays them on women’s shoulders (see Matthew 23:4). Meanwhile, those who teach these things effectively “shut the kingdom of heaven in [their] faces” (verse 13). When we define gender roles too narrowly, overemphasizing a limited number of texts while completely ignoring the breadth of Scripture— when we try to make Scripture say more than it actually does or tell any segment of people that only certain parts of the Scripture concern them (whether we intentionally communicate this message or not)— we do so to the detriment of women and men, and to the detriment of the church and its mission in the world. and soul crushing to tell a woman that the only worthwhile activity she can do is to birth children and serve a husband and a family. This mind- set also creates an idol out of the family structure, making success as a homemaker/mother the most important vocation in a woman’s life. And although this is a high calling, it should not trump our first and foremost calling: to believe in Christ. In response to the evils of radical feminism, which shamed women who didn’t work outside the home, the radical femininity movement has shamed Christian women who work outside the home (for a variety of reasons) or who are not married or who have been divorced. Many Christian women have been taught that motherhood is not only their highest calling but also that it is the only calling they should aspire to. It seems a little like the drunk man who falls off his horse on one side and climbs back into the saddle, only to fall off on the other. Taken from Good News for Weary Women by Elyse Fitzpatrick copyright © 2014. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. I received a copy of this book from the Tyndale Blog Network in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This is a must-read, especially if you're prone to doing things simply from a sense of duty! I am definitely this way, and although I wouldn't have put it in such terms as “I have to wash these dishes in order to please God,” I basically made the cleanliness of my house into the measure of how I'm doing as a wife. (My husband is not particular and has told me many times that I'm doing fine, but I still feel unworthy sometimes.) Mrs. Fitzpatrick does a wonderful job of pointing out ways we let the This is a must-read, especially if you're prone to doing things simply from a sense of duty! I am definitely this way, and although I wouldn't have put it in such terms as “I have to wash these dishes in order to please God,” I basically made the cleanliness of my house into the measure of how I'm doing as a wife. (My husband is not particular and has told me many times that I'm doing fine, but I still feel unworthy sometimes.) Mrs. Fitzpatrick does a wonderful job of pointing out ways we let the world's messages creep into our mind; she also shows ways the Church has overreacted to the voice of the world or taken biblical wisdom too far. For example, we take words such as “...teach the younger women...to be keepers at home” to mean that if your house isn't perfectly clean, you're somehow not living up to God's standard. Of course, there's nothing wrong with keeping your house clean or wearing dresses every day or spending your money a certain way. The problem is when we elevate such advice to the place of being what makes us pleasing to God--or not, if we don't measure up. The Pharisees of Jesus's time had taken God's good law (which no one could ever perfectly keep except God Himself) and added so many regulations to it that Jesus told them, “You lay aside the commands of God for the sake of your traditions.” We are in danger of doing the same when we create our own ideas about what it means to be a godly woman. The good news is that it's Jesus's perfect keeping of God's law and His death on the cross that makes us acceptable to God! To-do lists are great, but do not be bound by them. The completion of them will not change our standing with the Lord! The final chapter, “What's on His list for you today?” was extremely helpful, as were the little sections of things people tell women they need to do in order to be godly. I could laugh at some of them, but some of them were things I realized I was subconsciously believing. Now go find a copy and read it! It won't make you any more pleasing to God, but it might help you rejoice a little more in what He's done for you!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Glaser

    I think this book is very helpful for women who have fallen for the idea that we can have it all (worldly beliefs) or that we can be a super saint (legalistic Christian beliefs). So many women exhaust themselves trying to live up to unrealistic expectations. The author points us to the Gospel as the way to deprogram these beliefs. The appendix has a helpful list of scriptures for areas of struggle (thinking you are too messed up for God to love you, trying to make God like you, thinking you meas I think this book is very helpful for women who have fallen for the idea that we can have it all (worldly beliefs) or that we can be a super saint (legalistic Christian beliefs). So many women exhaust themselves trying to live up to unrealistic expectations. The author points us to the Gospel as the way to deprogram these beliefs. The appendix has a helpful list of scriptures for areas of struggle (thinking you are too messed up for God to love you, trying to make God like you, thinking you measure up, searching for true rest). The book helped give me a new perspective about my upbringing. I was not raised in a Christian home until I turned twelve. I felt a little envious about my Christian friends who had that growing up. We moved around a lot (Navy family) so we never got engrained in legalistic churches. The women in my life did not have rigid ideas of what it means to be a woman so I did not seriously think about it until I resigned from the Navy in my thirties. I could have easily fallen for the superwoman concept but my daughter had autism and that was the great reset for me. I had to figure it out slowly. Looking back, I can see that being isolated from these influences helped me avoid some serious pitfalls.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Jackson

    When the opportunity arose to receive a review copy of Elyse Fitzpatrick's latest book, Good News for Weary Women: Escaping the Bondage of To-Do Lists, Steps, and Bad Advice , I jumped on it. Years ago, I had the privilege of hearing Elyse teach on contentment at a women's conference, teaching which is summed up in her excellent book, Idols of the Heart: Learning to Long for God Alone . The teaching was both eye-opening and heart-changing, and more of my weakness is revealed each time I go throu When the opportunity arose to receive a review copy of Elyse Fitzpatrick's latest book, Good News for Weary Women: Escaping the Bondage of To-Do Lists, Steps, and Bad Advice , I jumped on it. Years ago, I had the privilege of hearing Elyse teach on contentment at a women's conference, teaching which is summed up in her excellent book, Idols of the Heart: Learning to Long for God Alone . The teaching was both eye-opening and heart-changing, and more of my weakness is revealed each time I go through the book. I've since enjoyed several other encouraging books by Fitzpatrick, finding her writing to be transparent and encouraging as it points me toward truth. Fitzpatrick defines the purpose of Good News for Weary Women this way: "In all of this, I pray most sincerely that women will rediscover the profound grace that is ours through the good news; that we are forgiven, loved, and already counted perfect." As Christian women, this is grace that we all need to be reminded of, often on an everyday basis. The book is broken into eight chapters: How Did We End Up Here? What Ever Happened to the Good News Laws, Rules, Steps and More Bad News When Rules Define You The Delusion of Self-Perfection Who is Your God? He Said Us! What's on His List for You Today? According to Fitzpatrick, this book was birthed out of responses to a request she posed on Facebook: "Okay, friends ... I need your help. I'd like to know the dumbest things people tell women they have to do in order to be godly. Ready . . . Go!" The response was "mind boggling -- and frankly, pretty troubling. Nearly twenty thousand women read the post,and almost five hundred responded. And that was all within twenty-four hours!" Throughout the book, Fitzpatrick includes lists of those responses, as well as other lies women have been told about their relationship with God. I found this book to be part biographical, part exposé of today's church, and somewhat repetitive from chapter to chapter. While the theme of each chapter varied, two things were clear and constant: the world, the church, and our own hearts place unbiblical demands on us, and Scripture leads us to understand that, in Christ, we are fully acceptable to God. I feel compelled, however, to point out what seemed to me as two weaknesses of this book. First, I was concerned that the gospel was not clearly laid out from the onset. For the unbeliever, or maybe even the new believer, the content might lead them toward a sort of easy-believism or even into a let-go-and-let-God mentality. To be sure, Fitzpatrick does share the gospel through her own salvation testimony in an appendix at the back of the book. Second, I think it would have been helpful to have included some guidance on thinking through progressive sanctification and Christian disciplines. While it's true that once we are saved we are righteous in God's eyes, we can't discard the idea of becoming more Christlike in our living. And because of our fleshly state, there is an ebb and flow to this that requires discipline -- duty, even. Colossians 1:9-14 encourages us toward this: "And so, from the day we heard, we have not ceased to pray for you, asking that you may be filled with the knowledge of his will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding, so as to walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him, bearing fruit in every good work and increasing in the knowledge of God. May you be strengthened with all power, according to his glorious might, for all endurance and patience with joy, giving thanks to the Father, who has qualified you to share in the inheritance of the saints in light. He has delivered us from the domain of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins." (ESV) For this reason, there are several other books I would recommend to weary women over this book. Each of these have encouraged and challenged me as I've read them: Idols of the Heart: Learning to Long for God Alone (also by Elyse Fitzpatrick) Damsels in Distress: Biblical Solutions for Problems Women Face (by Martha Peace) Disciplines of a Godly Woman (by Barbara Hughes) Lies Women Believe: And the Truth that Sets Them Free (by Nancy Leigh DeMoss) Other books which might also be helpful include The Gospel for Real Life, Growing Your Faith, and Transforming Grace (all by Jerry Bridges), as well as Holiness by Grace (by Bryan Chapell), and Faithfulness and Holiness (by J.I. Packer), which includes J.C. Ryle's classic, Holiness. Let me close with some words from Ryle's book: "When I speak of "growth in grace," I do not for a moment mean that . . . (a believer) can grow in safety, acceptance with God, or security. I do not mean that he can ever be more justified, more pardoned, more forgiven, more at peace with God, then (sic) he is the first moment he believes . . . . When I speak of "growth in grace" I only mean increase in the degree, size strength, vigour, and power of the graces which the Holy Spirt plants in a believer's heart . . . . When I speak of a man "growing in grace," I mean simply this -- that his sense of sin is becoming deeper, his faith stronger, his hope brighter, his love more extensive, his spiritual-mindedness more marked. He feels more of it in his life. He is going on from strength to strength, from faith to faith, and from grace to grace." Tyndale House Publishers provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for a review; however, the views stated here are my own.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Cain

    Last year I read Elyse Fitzpatrick’s Give Them Grace and fell in love. She captivated me with her incredibly easy-to-read, humorous, yet blunt style of writing, so when I had the opportunity to write a review on her brand new book, Good News for Weary Women, I couldn’t refuse! And the timing couldn’t have been better! Good News for Weary Women was both refreshing and convicting, leaving me with a lot to contemplate, and a heightened sense of gratitude for the work of Christ. In our fast-paced soci Last year I read Elyse Fitzpatrick’s Give Them Grace and fell in love. She captivated me with her incredibly easy-to-read, humorous, yet blunt style of writing, so when I had the opportunity to write a review on her brand new book, Good News for Weary Women, I couldn’t refuse! And the timing couldn’t have been better! Good News for Weary Women was both refreshing and convicting, leaving me with a lot to contemplate, and a heightened sense of gratitude for the work of Christ. In our fast-paced society, it is easy to become weary. We struggle under burdens we pile on ourselves, constantly comparing ourselves to others, trying to see how we measure up, desperately hoping for some relief from the striving, the trying-hard, the suffocating behind our facades of having it all together. NEWS FLASH: None of us have it together, and we never will. Like it or not, we simply cannot control our lives. Sure we have responsibility, we have choices to make, but ultimately, it is God, in His Providence, who orchestrates our lives, all for our good and His Glory. So the weeks when you spend hours on the phone trying to fix your unresponsive computer? When you feel like you can never make it through that growing to-do list? When you are sitting in the intensive care waiting room, wondering if your loved one will make it through an eight hour surgery okay? When you are pinching pennies until the scream? When your heart breaks as you watch a loved one lose their memory to Alzheimer’s? When you just don’t know how to be brave and pursue your dreams? That is when we need to remember the Gospel, and like Elyse Fitzpatrick reminds us over and over again in Good News for Weary Women, our justfication through Christ is complete. We don’t have to struggle through the days, wondering if we are doing enough, measuring up, becoming more weary by the moment. We can actually begin to embrace the joy of who God created us to be, to learn to love how He so wisely designed and gifted us, unbound by the endless rules we so often create for ourselves. We can rest in the beautiful fact that our standing before God is not impacted by how many organic, from-scratch meals we fix a day, whether we wear jeans or jumpers, whether we have tattoos or not, whether we listen to a capella hymns or pop music. And when we stop comparing ourselves to others, we can love them for who they are, no matter how different they are from us. We as Christians, particularly Christian women, need to shake off the bad, unbiblical advice we get, whether it is from the church or the world, and fix our eyes on Jesus, who has already justified us by His work on the cross. It is finished. Our job is not to earn good standing with God– we have the free gift of Grace we never deserved, and never will, and Christ’s sacrifice was complete, and no matter how much it hurts our pride, He doesn’t need our help! I am so thankful for Elyse Fitzpatrick’s timely message in Good News for Weary Women. I highly recommend it, and give it an “A+”. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the Tyndale Blogger Network. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Erin M

    Elyse's message is one that is vital for women seeking Christ. A few of my favorite quotes: "When we don't see the connection between the righteous life Jesus lived and our standing before a holy God, we are setting ourselves up for bondage. Many women don't understand the freedom that has been purchased for us, and we often get tangled up in the legalism and moralism. We don't know what it would look like for obedience to be motivated by gratitude." "Our highest calling is to believe in and love Elyse's message is one that is vital for women seeking Christ. A few of my favorite quotes: "When we don't see the connection between the righteous life Jesus lived and our standing before a holy God, we are setting ourselves up for bondage. Many women don't understand the freedom that has been purchased for us, and we often get tangled up in the legalism and moralism. We don't know what it would look like for obedience to be motivated by gratitude." "Our highest calling is to believe in and love the gospel and then to live our lives in the light of all Jesus has already done for us." "Our principal concern is not that we don't have God's approval; it's that we don't really care that we do...Aside from the fact that self-forgiveness isn't even hinted at in Scripture, this impulse to seek okay-ness in our own eyes is a clear indication of our apathy about God's opinion and our bondage to our own. For the majority of Christians, the most pressing question is not, How can I be right with God? but rather, How can I be right in my own eyes? So perhaps the real question all of us need to ask is this: Who is our god? Are we worshipping the one true God, or are we worshipping ourselves?" "The critical point is whether we believe that God's word for us, about us, and to us is sufficient for us. Do we believe it's enough to be called His beloved daughter and son? Or will we try to make bread out of those lifeless stones (Matthew 4:3) we find in our own lives? When we face disappointment, discouragement, and questions that seem to have no answer, will His Word suffice for us, or will we demand something more?" "But the messages of "Be a perfect mom" and "Be a perfect woman" are not the gospel. That is not good news. This is a false message of self-salvation, and it is not what Jesus has to say to us. Jesus was no chauvinist. He loved women. He didn't tell women to spend their days worrying about whether they looked good enough for their husbands or making perfectly balanced organic lunches. He wasn't looking for a trophy wife who would enhance His reputation or for a supermom who posted the best crafts on Pinterest. Jesus told women that He loved them and that they could rest in Him."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mariejkt

    "Good News For Weary Women" by Elyse M. Fitzpatrick is about freeing Christian women from the extra rules we and society add to us that are not in the scripture. The following is an excerpt from the book just to give you a taste of what its about "I have a daughter, two daughters-in-law,and two granddaughters, and if there is anything I want them to know, it is this: There is good news for you. You don’t need to learn secret steps, try harder and harder, wear yourself out in an attempt to be bea "Good News For Weary Women" by Elyse M. Fitzpatrick is about freeing Christian women from the extra rules we and society add to us that are not in the scripture. The following is an excerpt from the book just to give you a taste of what its about "I have a daughter, two daughters-in-law,and two granddaughters, and if there is anything I want them to know, it is this: There is good news for you. You don’t need to learn secret steps, try harder and harder, wear yourself out in an attempt to be beautiful, snag Mr. Perfect, or raise perfect children. You are already welcomed, loved, forgiven, and completely okay. You can laugh and rest and resist all the ways the world lies to you and tells you you’re not good enough. And you can love God because He has already loved you. You can be free to fail, to rest, to love, to be weak, to grow, and to know that everything is already given to you in Him." Most of these type of books say what we are not supposed add rules that above and beyond scripture then they add rules but this author did not do that. I was very impressed by this book when I requested it I did realize how much I needed it. The author really helps to remind us women and even men that just cause one thing is good for us we don't need to make it legalistic type of thing. Also how we have a tendency to add things we see or hear that are not in scripture to our life/beliefs such as karma. She does not mixes words and even breaks down sacred cows of Christian society and women. For example like all Christian women have to have a perfectly clean and organized house (come to my home you will not see perfectly clean or organized home its not that I don't try but I work partime, homeschool, and I am a bit of a slob). This book was a perfect book for me at this time in my life as I was starting to fall into the trap of trying to be like other Christian women I know but I know I need to be the woman God made me which is a unique person. I highly recommend this book for any woman especially women book studies. I was given this book to review by Tyndale Publishers and was not required to give a positive review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Good News for Weary Women Elyse Fitzpatrick Book Summary: Are you exhausted? Women today really do feel the weight of the world on their shoulders. Every morning we are greeted with a long list of to-dos: get the kids up and out the door on time, have a meaningful quiet time, put in a full day at the office, spend an hour at the gym, prepare a healthy and delicious meal (organic and locally grown, of course), and make sure the sink sparkles before you go to bed. Oh, and don’t forget to look great Good News for Weary Women Elyse Fitzpatrick Book Summary: Are you exhausted? Women today really do feel the weight of the world on their shoulders. Every morning we are greeted with a long list of to-dos: get the kids up and out the door on time, have a meaningful quiet time, put in a full day at the office, spend an hour at the gym, prepare a healthy and delicious meal (organic and locally grown, of course), and make sure the sink sparkles before you go to bed. Oh, and don’t forget to look great and smile while you’re doing it. These are all good things to do, of course. But the bigger problem occurs when we start to feel as if our worth is measured by our to-do lists. And the messages we receive at church, on Facebook, and from the media only perpetuate these unrealistic expectations, creating a relentless cycle of exhaustion. As Elyse Fitzpatrick has traveled this country, she has seen increasing evidence of this weariness epidemic invading our churches and communities. And she has good news for women everywhere: there is hope! God doesn’t judge us by our to-do lists. Instead, He calls us to faith. Free yourself today from the endless stream of bad advice and discover the true rest God offers. Review: Over all it was an easy read. I liked the reminder of not working for salvation. My favorite examples were the personal ones. I think that many of the examples were all the same complaint and therefore sometimes repeating things. The part I think that gets forgotten is that there is to be a changed life after Christ came into my life. That the Christian life is more challenging than prior to my conversion. There is no getting around that because while not looking to win more favor I am running a race to finish the Christian life by striving to see Christ more, that can not be done if my thoughts and heart are tied to this world. There is a tension that can not be overcome except by prayer and leaning on Christ I would like to thank Net Galley and Tyndale House for allowing me to read and review this book in return for a free copy and I was never asked to write a favorable review by anyone.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy Cutler

    If you've been a reader of my blog for any amount of time, you know this past year has been especially hard for me. Weary was a perfect way to explain me. So when I saw this book come up for review, I knew I just had to read it! Every woman knows that there are certain expectations of us. Our houses must always be spotless, without any knickknacks out of place, not a speck of dust anywhere, and it must smell of fresh cut flowers. Our meals must be prepared all by hand from only the freshest ingre If you've been a reader of my blog for any amount of time, you know this past year has been especially hard for me. Weary was a perfect way to explain me. So when I saw this book come up for review, I knew I just had to read it! Every woman knows that there are certain expectations of us. Our houses must always be spotless, without any knickknacks out of place, not a speck of dust anywhere, and it must smell of fresh cut flowers. Our meals must be prepared all by hand from only the freshest ingredients. That's tiring just reading it y'all! The expectations aren't realistic but nonetheless, it leaves us feeling incompetent. So how do we overcome these expectations poured on us as women? Oh, how this book was needed! Elyse basically says that these expectations do little more than make us feel worthless. Can I get an Amen!! They certainly don't encourage us at all. They take our attention from what really matters, Gods expectations of us. What are His two instructions to us? To Love Him and Love others. He wants us to believe in Him. He didn't say "you're only a good Christian girl if you make all your meals gluten free, wear well put together outfits and clean your house from top to bottom daily". This book was so encouraging! I would highly recommend it to all women! Thank you to Tyndale Publishers for a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest and unbiased review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    I’ll be honest and say that I picked this book because I expected not to like it. It seemed like good fodder for a writer just coming to terms with a little bit of feminism. Books written specifically for women can be hard to stomach. But I was surprised with this one. Good News for Weary Women was gracefully written and gracefully delivered. And by ‘gracefully’ I mean ‘as if filled with grace’ not ‘as if flitting lightly through a field of daisies’. Grace filled pages. In this book, Elyse M. Fitzpatr I’ll be honest and say that I picked this book because I expected not to like it. It seemed like good fodder for a writer just coming to terms with a little bit of feminism. Books written specifically for women can be hard to stomach. But I was surprised with this one. Good News for Weary Women was gracefully written and gracefully delivered. And by ‘gracefully’ I mean ‘as if filled with grace’ not ‘as if flitting lightly through a field of daisies’. Grace filled pages. In this book, Elyse M. Fitzpatrick, offers us hope and freedom from the expectations of the world as she writes about the completely finished work of Christ, our place in the salvation story, and our work in His creation. Instead of searching for acceptance and peace by doing more and being better, we can rest and have faith that God doesn’t need (or require) our many and small efforts. Fitzpatrick carefully outlines the gospel and exactly what it means for us, as women in a world of too much to do, too many opinions, and too many expectations, to be gifted a place of acceptance in God’s eyes. We can stop trying to measure up and just rest. Read the rest of my review here: http://proverbsnineteen21.wordpress.c...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Huskisson

    I wildly misjudged this book by the cover; cliche and cheesy, but the book was not anything like that. I don't know if it was just because this was pretty timely for me or because it was solid, but I don't think I highlighted a book so much; even the footnotes. Fitzpatrick was raw and very honest. She was raw about all the ways we are sinners, and all the ways we fight to feel 'okay' and how that's making ourself into God. And then she was honest about the gospel and that it's not about us makin I wildly misjudged this book by the cover; cliche and cheesy, but the book was not anything like that. I don't know if it was just because this was pretty timely for me or because it was solid, but I don't think I highlighted a book so much; even the footnotes. Fitzpatrick was raw and very honest. She was raw about all the ways we are sinners, and all the ways we fight to feel 'okay' and how that's making ourself into God. And then she was honest about the gospel and that it's not about us making ourselves okay. She exposes the fact that “Our pursuit of self-perfection is a denial of Christ because it is His work to make us okay to justify us” (108), but also that “You’re okay-ness rests in the fact that God has forgiven all your sin” (41). I think this is exactly what I needed to hear and continue to learn.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emily Duffey

    This is one of those books that I want to read again... And again... Simply to remind myself of what I know to be true, and to check my thinking against Scripture when I get caught up in all the "stuff" of life (as I intentionally live a busy life). Remembering to rest in the truth of the gospel and who I am in Christ is a precious truth that should never be forgotten--yet at times I do. And when you do forget, or lose your focus, or end up beaten down, discouraged, in a heap on the floor exhaus This is one of those books that I want to read again... And again... Simply to remind myself of what I know to be true, and to check my thinking against Scripture when I get caught up in all the "stuff" of life (as I intentionally live a busy life). Remembering to rest in the truth of the gospel and who I am in Christ is a precious truth that should never be forgotten--yet at times I do. And when you do forget, or lose your focus, or end up beaten down, discouraged, in a heap on the floor exhausted by your "doing" and need a reminder of what's most important--grab this book. It will encourage your heart and refocus your heart and thoughts on what matters most: Jesus.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    I really appreciated the premise of this book. It is refreshing to have a book for Christian ladies that does not add more to-do lists to our lives! That said, I felt the first half of the book just didn't speak much to me because Fitzpatrick came across a little angry and bitter. The second half of the book was very good, though, and I appreciated her thoughts on testing whether much of what we hear from the church is Law or Gospel by checking if it is something that the Bible specifically comm I really appreciated the premise of this book. It is refreshing to have a book for Christian ladies that does not add more to-do lists to our lives! That said, I felt the first half of the book just didn't speak much to me because Fitzpatrick came across a little angry and bitter. The second half of the book was very good, though, and I appreciated her thoughts on testing whether much of what we hear from the church is Law or Gospel by checking if it is something that the Bible specifically commands. I also liked how she urged us to live transparently so we don't do other Christian women the disservice of thinking we all live "perfect" lives.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    I gave this three stars because after the first half, I put it down and never picked it up. I greatly appreciated her perspective and view in women. In the conservative Christian circle, you hear a lot of "roles" and "motherhood is the greatest calling" nonsense. She spoke truth that I think ALL females followers of Jesus could benefit from. Her message is fantastic! However, about half way through I kept taking the same message from each chapter. Absolutely worth the read if you're tired of hea I gave this three stars because after the first half, I put it down and never picked it up. I greatly appreciated her perspective and view in women. In the conservative Christian circle, you hear a lot of "roles" and "motherhood is the greatest calling" nonsense. She spoke truth that I think ALL females followers of Jesus could benefit from. Her message is fantastic! However, about half way through I kept taking the same message from each chapter. Absolutely worth the read if you're tired of hearing you need to be a wife or mom to have value. But, you may not finish the book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    Good News for Weary Women: Escaping the Bondage of To-Do Lists, Steps, and Bad Advice by Elyse Fitzpatrick could not have come at a better time for someone like me. Read my full review here. *I received a free copy of this title in ebook form through netgalley.com and Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. in exchange for an honest review.* Good News for Weary Women: Escaping the Bondage of To-Do Lists, Steps, and Bad Advice by Elyse Fitzpatrick could not have come at a better time for someone like me. Read my full review here. *I received a free copy of this title in ebook form through netgalley.com and Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. in exchange for an honest review.*

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marguerite Harrell

    November 5th, 2015 -- I started reading this book. This book is for the Women's Grace Group Mini - Retreat that we will have this coming January. So far, I am enjoying this book. I finish this book on Dec 2nd, 2015. Great book so far. I will read (skim through) this book again in January before the Women's Grace Group Mini-Retreat. Yes, it gotten 4 Stars and still a great book. There were some had me scratching my head though. November 5th, 2015 -- I started reading this book. This book is for the Women's Grace Group Mini - Retreat that we will have this coming January. So far, I am enjoying this book. I finish this book on Dec 2nd, 2015. Great book so far. I will read (skim through) this book again in January before the Women's Grace Group Mini-Retreat. Yes, it gotten 4 Stars and still a great book. There were some had me scratching my head though.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Wendy C

    the beat part of the book is recognizing we can trust in Jesus perfectly lived life for us as our own righteousness given by Him. Really helpful to live into this truth in our day to day failures and need of His help

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    There was good and bad in this book. I thought it had a lot of really good points with really good justification but I didn’t agree with everything and some of it I couldn’t relate to at all. But overall I felt the book had a good objective and was a good read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    JEM

    3.5 stars - it felt a bit repetitive in places but otherwise good

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

    A good book with a much needed message. It did feel a bit repetitive at times and so it was a bit of struggle to finish.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Aimee

    I just love Elyse Fitzpatrick. She is real and wise and talks straight. This topic of grace for women is covered in several books right now and this one is a good addition to that group.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie

    Loving Christ should lead to more freedom and joy, not more rules and guilt. I love the Gospel-centered message of this book. Might need to buy a stack and give copies away!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Barbara D

    Loved this book - you can read my review here: http://www.worthdoingpoorly.com/good-... Loved this book - you can read my review here: http://www.worthdoingpoorly.com/good-...

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