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Reading With Pictures: Comics That Make Kids Smarter

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 Comics make learning fun!  Comics have gone from "scourge of the classroom" to legitimate teaching tools, and the Common Core State Standards for scholastic achievement now explicitly recommend their use in the classroom. Reading With Pictures: Comics That Make Kids Smarter unites the finest creative talents in the comics industry with the nation's leading experts in visual  Comics make learning fun!  Comics have gone from "scourge of the classroom" to legitimate teaching tools, and the Common Core State Standards for scholastic achievement now explicitly recommend their use in the classroom. Reading With Pictures: Comics That Make Kids Smarter unites the finest creative talents in the comics industry with the nation's leading experts in visual literacy to create a game-changing tool for the classroom and beyond. This full-color volume features more than a dozen short stories (both fiction and nonfiction) that address topics in Social Studies, Math, Language Arts, and Science, while offering an immersive textual and visual experience that kids will enjoy. Highlights include George Washington: Action President by Fred Van Lente and Ryan Dunlavey, Doctor Sputnik: Man of Science by Roger Langridge, The Power of Print by Katie Cook, and many more.  Includes a foreword by Printz and Eisner Award-winning author Gene Luen Yang (American Born Chinese, Boxers and Saints).  A downloadable Teachers' Guide includes standards-correlated lesson plans customized to each story, research-based justifications for using comics in the classroom, a guide to establishing best classroom practices, and a comprehensive listing of educational resources.


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 Comics make learning fun!  Comics have gone from "scourge of the classroom" to legitimate teaching tools, and the Common Core State Standards for scholastic achievement now explicitly recommend their use in the classroom. Reading With Pictures: Comics That Make Kids Smarter unites the finest creative talents in the comics industry with the nation's leading experts in visual  Comics make learning fun!  Comics have gone from "scourge of the classroom" to legitimate teaching tools, and the Common Core State Standards for scholastic achievement now explicitly recommend their use in the classroom. Reading With Pictures: Comics That Make Kids Smarter unites the finest creative talents in the comics industry with the nation's leading experts in visual literacy to create a game-changing tool for the classroom and beyond. This full-color volume features more than a dozen short stories (both fiction and nonfiction) that address topics in Social Studies, Math, Language Arts, and Science, while offering an immersive textual and visual experience that kids will enjoy. Highlights include George Washington: Action President by Fred Van Lente and Ryan Dunlavey, Doctor Sputnik: Man of Science by Roger Langridge, The Power of Print by Katie Cook, and many more.  Includes a foreword by Printz and Eisner Award-winning author Gene Luen Yang (American Born Chinese, Boxers and Saints).  A downloadable Teachers' Guide includes standards-correlated lesson plans customized to each story, research-based justifications for using comics in the classroom, a guide to establishing best classroom practices, and a comprehensive listing of educational resources.

30 review for Reading With Pictures: Comics That Make Kids Smarter

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    For the most part, the math and science comics were a bit too in-your-face in their attempts at adding math and science lessons in a comic book format. I appreciate the attempt, and the two comics Finding Ivy (learning roman numerals) and the Solution Squad did work, as they integrated just a few concepts into plots that were plausible. On the other hand, the Social Studies section was wonderfully done, immersive and educational, while still being entertaining. If that had been the whole book, i For the most part, the math and science comics were a bit too in-your-face in their attempts at adding math and science lessons in a comic book format. I appreciate the attempt, and the two comics Finding Ivy (learning roman numerals) and the Solution Squad did work, as they integrated just a few concepts into plots that were plausible. On the other hand, the Social Studies section was wonderfully done, immersive and educational, while still being entertaining. If that had been the whole book, it would've received a much higher rating.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dddd

    good

  3. 4 out of 5

    April Suter

    History, math, science and more!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    The Brothers

    Dexter (10yo) read. Some great comic writers / artists band together to write some stories about concepts in science and math to the language arts.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Maurer

    I took my nieces to comic con in August and decided it would defeat the purpose if we didn't look at the comics. I am very glad the girls chose this one. The 9 and 7 year old loved the book. They liked the pictures and the stories. I thought the science and math concepts were depicted in an interesting way. It was nothing new to me, but I wished I had read it this when I was younger because I may have understood the concepts better. My favorite section was the social studies section. It was very I took my nieces to comic con in August and decided it would defeat the purpose if we didn't look at the comics. I am very glad the girls chose this one. The 9 and 7 year old loved the book. They liked the pictures and the stories. I thought the science and math concepts were depicted in an interesting way. It was nothing new to me, but I wished I had read it this when I was younger because I may have understood the concepts better. My favorite section was the social studies section. It was very interesting.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    Well done anthology showcasing comics on different subjects for use in the classroom. A couple of the math and science ones are kind of weak, but most do a good job explaining their topic inside a story. The history section made the best use of the learn-through-comics idea, but that makes sense since history is just telling a story anyway. I particulary enjoyed the Newton and Washington sections. Since this is aimed at grade schoolers, I already knew most of it. But I did learn a few new things Well done anthology showcasing comics on different subjects for use in the classroom. A couple of the math and science ones are kind of weak, but most do a good job explaining their topic inside a story. The history section made the best use of the learn-through-comics idea, but that makes sense since history is just telling a story anyway. I particulary enjoyed the Newton and Washington sections. Since this is aimed at grade schoolers, I already knew most of it. But I did learn a few new things so I'd assume most kids would too. And most importantly, the majority of it is fun.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kierra Daniels

    I love this book because it shows that comics and cartoons can make kids smarter. This is a very entertaining book. The characters and action are very phenomena, and theres no blood in it at all. Influences kids to do better to school and teaches them that school can be very fun, but also very boring too.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Maybe kids would find it more entertaining, but I just found it dumb. Couldn't even finish reading the whole book. Found little of actual substance in it, although I did enjoy the segment on Galileo. Maybe kids would find it more entertaining, but I just found it dumb. Couldn't even finish reading the whole book. Found little of actual substance in it, although I did enjoy the segment on Galileo.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mary Anne

    Designed to illustrate how comics can be excellent learning tools, this book contains comics from a wide variety of contributors addressing academic subjects including math, science, history and language arts. I liked the science stories the best and probably the math the least.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I loved the idea of this book, but honestly my kids did not love it, they didn't hate it but they didn't read it for fun either. Frankly the individual stories might be more palatable in small doses as opposed to this big compendium. I loved the idea of this book, but honestly my kids did not love it, they didn't hate it but they didn't read it for fun either. Frankly the individual stories might be more palatable in small doses as opposed to this big compendium.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Enjoyed it overall. Learned about the Whiskey Rebellion, proving to me that comics are great for teaching history (not that I doubted it)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ashleigh

    There are comics that have to deal with social studies, science, math, language arts. Stories included: George Washington Sputnik Power of Print

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shari

    Elder and colleagues show how teachers can use comics and graphic novels to engage and teach.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mickslibrarian

  18. 4 out of 5

    Felicia

  19. 5 out of 5

    Calvin DeMar

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Harrison

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mike Bertram

  23. 4 out of 5

    Justine

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael Marrella

  25. 4 out of 5

    Max

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Hess

  27. 4 out of 5

    kim jones

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mel

  29. 5 out of 5

    Robin

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brent Ecenbarger

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