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THE CASPAK TRILOGY COLLECTION (THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT-THE PEOPLE THAT TIME FORGOT- OUT OF TIME'S ABYSS) BY EDGAR R BURROUGHS -THE AUTHOR OF JOHN CARTER and TARZAN (ANNOTATED) FREE AUDIOBOOK LINK

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The Caspak trilogy collection is a science fiction novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs. His working title for the story was "The Lost U-Boat." It was first published in Blue Book Magazine as a three-part serial in the issues for September, October and November 1918. The complete trilogy was later combined for publication in book form under the title of the first part by A. C. Mc The Caspak trilogy collection is a science fiction novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs. His working title for the story was "The Lost U-Boat." It was first published in Blue Book Magazine as a three-part serial in the issues for September, October and November 1918. The complete trilogy was later combined for publication in book form under the title of the first part by A. C. McClurg in June 1924. Beginning with the Ace Books editions of the 1960s, the three segments have usually been issued as separate short novels. The first of these is treated in this article. In this collection included: 1.The Land That Time Forgot 2.The People That Time Forgot 3.Out of Time’s Abyss


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The Caspak trilogy collection is a science fiction novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs. His working title for the story was "The Lost U-Boat." It was first published in Blue Book Magazine as a three-part serial in the issues for September, October and November 1918. The complete trilogy was later combined for publication in book form under the title of the first part by A. C. Mc The Caspak trilogy collection is a science fiction novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs. His working title for the story was "The Lost U-Boat." It was first published in Blue Book Magazine as a three-part serial in the issues for September, October and November 1918. The complete trilogy was later combined for publication in book form under the title of the first part by A. C. McClurg in June 1924. Beginning with the Ace Books editions of the 1960s, the three segments have usually been issued as separate short novels. The first of these is treated in this article. In this collection included: 1.The Land That Time Forgot 2.The People That Time Forgot 3.Out of Time’s Abyss

30 review for THE CASPAK TRILOGY COLLECTION (THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT-THE PEOPLE THAT TIME FORGOT- OUT OF TIME'S ABYSS) BY EDGAR R BURROUGHS -THE AUTHOR OF JOHN CARTER and TARZAN (ANNOTATED) FREE AUDIOBOOK LINK

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    I enjoyed this more at age eighteen than at age fifty eight. I’m afraid forty years have made me more analytical, more critical, more rational, and more cynical. When Burroughs published this in 1918 Piltdown Man had not yet been exposed as a hoax and terms like “negroid” and “Jap” were not yet intuitively racist and offensive. While, taken in the context of their time, such perceived transgressions are perfectly understandable, they nevertheless indelibly stamp the material as dated and the sci I enjoyed this more at age eighteen than at age fifty eight. I’m afraid forty years have made me more analytical, more critical, more rational, and more cynical. When Burroughs published this in 1918 Piltdown Man had not yet been exposed as a hoax and terms like “negroid” and “Jap” were not yet intuitively racist and offensive. While, taken in the context of their time, such perceived transgressions are perfectly understandable, they nevertheless indelibly stamp the material as dated and the science, albeit fictional, as flawed. I guess there are some touchstones of my youth that are best left to the fog of memory.

  2. 4 out of 5

    The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon)

    This is the Omnibus Version of Edgar Rice Burrough's (ERB) Caspakian Novels. Included here are: The Land That Time Forgot The People That Time Forgot Out of Time's Abyss These are three novels of adventure told in a classic style similar to that of Jack London, Arthur Conan Doyle and H.G. Wells. This is a style of early in the last century and more like the century before it. It's a story that is narrated to us, rather than painted so that we can experience it. And it's full of adventure, love, cour This is the Omnibus Version of Edgar Rice Burrough's (ERB) Caspakian Novels. Included here are: The Land That Time Forgot The People That Time Forgot Out of Time's Abyss These are three novels of adventure told in a classic style similar to that of Jack London, Arthur Conan Doyle and H.G. Wells. This is a style of early in the last century and more like the century before it. It's a story that is narrated to us, rather than painted so that we can experience it. And it's full of adventure, love, courage, wickendess, danger, and...dinosaurs! The tale: Set in the early stages of World War One, The Great War, where German U-boats terrorize the seas our hero Bowen Tyler, who happens to be a ship-builder's son and an expert in avionics, gets his transport torpedoed out from under him while on his way to join the war effort as part of an Ambulance Corps. With him is his trusty Airdale, trained in search and rescue, Hobbs (and Hobbs is so COOL! too...but I digress...parenthetically). After plunging into the frigid North Atlantic, Bowen manages to pull himself onto a boat and in a very, reverse Titanic (the movie) moment, snatches the slight, rich and very pretty Lysse from the jaws of death. The pair is rescued by a British Flagged Ocean Going Tugboat which is then set upon by the same dastardly German Submarine. From there, we are treated to fun plot that involves espionage deciet, combat, as Tyler and the Tug's crew battle the submarine, take it over then thanks to some trickery, find themselves hopelessly lost in the southern most reaches of the globe. In a desparate attempt to find food, water and oil (for the desiels) they traverse a trick half submerged cavern and find themselves in a lost world of wonder, where the normal rules of evolution, birth, rebirth and life no longer seem to hold sway. A land where dinosaurs and other beasts roam thick jungles and native tribes of pre-historic and bronze age humans struggle to stay alive long enough to advance to the next level of human hiearchy. Treachery, danger, love it's all in the air. The Second book takes up where the first leaves off with Tom Billings, Bowen's long time friend who gets his hands on Tyler's Journal in a bottle and sets out to find him. He's just like Bowen and sets off to find his long lost buddy...yes, this is what Bromance can do to you. Along the way he meets a beautiful Native girl, a savage and a barbarian and romance ensues. Billings has to overcome his own predjudice and misguided beliefs while battling the savage tribesmen and, he's still looking for Tyler. The Third book, my favorite, features a roughneck British Seaman from Book one, who set out on an exploratory mission from the fort that Tyler and sub/tug crew built. Along the way he was set upon by winged demons...well that's what some of them thought,anyway...and even when just hoping to find some fish and chips and petrol to get the sub back to a neutral port had an adventure find him and sweep him away... again, there's love in the air. All three stories are linked by Caspak and take us on three different adventures in this marvelous, creative fantasy world dreamed up by Burroughs. In the narrative tradition that books of the era had been written in, the focus is on the three major characters, Bowen, Bradley, and Tom, with a strong supporting role for their lady loves. It could be argued that Burroughts likely took those parts of pulp fiction books that he liked and re-invented them in his own vision for this. There are parts of "The Lost World" By Doyle, similar "love stories" as found in Jack London's "Star Rover" and, even simalarities to his first Novel-series Barsoom (Mars). Yet, as told here it's all remarkably new and different. ERB likely had no intention of writing a Socially conscious tale like the Green-story in Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, nor is it likely he tried to write a phlisophically conscious story like Jack London's "To Build a Fire" and "Star Rover". In fact, he probably just wrote it as he "felt it" with what he believed was a practical mind applying practical thinking to a fantastic situation (full of wonderful adventure). Yet, planned or not, within the folds is a story of hope for tolerance and a lesson that what makes us different as Human-beings is only flesh and bone, and skin, while what makes us Human's the same is far more spiritual in nature and more important. It's the story of the white man and the Native American Indian where two of his brawny new-worlders forget fall in love with Caspakian Princesses... savages. It's a story of class vs. class a barroness and a simple american cowboy (if a rich one). And through it, the fantastic river where evolution is disected before our eyes and, at the heart of it we find that all Human's are the same inside, even if we were hatched from an egg. Yet, a man who had as practical an outlook on life, who lived as a cowboy, and an Indian fighter, struggled with Eastern Schools and notions of propper behavior and a love of the outdoors likley did not think of all those things. He just day dreamed then wrote the dreams down... and what wonderfully fun dreams they were. These stories are full of adventure, and excitement, love and treachery, courage and cowardice. There is some violence but anyone age could enjoy these stories. Certainly Young Adults and old curmudeons who still have a little boy hiding somewhere in their hearts.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kat Hooper

    Originally posted at Fantasy Literature. You gotta love Edgar Rice Burroughs. He underperformed in life until, as a pencil sharpener salesman who spent his free time reading pulp magazines, he figured he could be paid to write “rot” at least as good as the “rot” he read in the pulps. And thus started the illustrious career of the man who brought us Tarzan, John Carter, and David Innes… And who inspired a generation of fantasy and science fiction writers. The Land that Time Forgot, a lost world sto Originally posted at Fantasy Literature. You gotta love Edgar Rice Burroughs. He underperformed in life until, as a pencil sharpener salesman who spent his free time reading pulp magazines, he figured he could be paid to write “rot” at least as good as the “rot” he read in the pulps. And thus started the illustrious career of the man who brought us Tarzan, John Carter, and David Innes… And who inspired a generation of fantasy and science fiction writers. The Land that Time Forgot, a lost world story set during World War I, is the first in Burroughs’ CASPAK trilogy. It was originally serialized in Blue Book Magazine in the fall of 1918 and then published as a novel in 1924. Bowen Tyler is on a boat that’s torpedoed and sunk by the Germans. He saves a beautiful drowning young woman who he immediately falls in love with (that’s always how it happens in these stories) and they end up on a submarine with several other Englishmen and several Germans. Eventually (half way through the novel) the story picks up when they land on a lost volcanic island that is inhabited by dinosaur-like animals and a few subhuman races that seem to be at different evolutionary stages. Like many lost world stories, The Land that Time Forgot has beautiful scenery, scary animals, primitive humans, and lots of adventure. Also like many of these stories, the action is the focus of the story and the characters are only shallowly drawn. For example, the beautiful young woman who the protagonist falls in love with has almost no personality, yet Bowen knows immediately that he loves her and, as expected, he is called on to bravely save her life more than once (while her previously modest clothing is now in tatters). There are the usual issues with sexism, racism, and classism, but these are the things that fans of old lost world stories know to expect — I have never read one that didn’t contain these annoying elements. For readers who know what to expect, The Land that Time Forgot is fun pulpy adventure that’s sure to please. I listened to the audio version of The Land that Time Forgot which was produced by Blackstone Audio and narrated by Raymond Todd. Todd’s voice is a bit mechanical sounding and he had a couple of mispronunciations (such as “gunwale” pronounced like it looks), but I sped him up a bit and was satisfied, though certainly not thrilled. I wouldn’t hesitate to suggest this title to audio readers, but I wouldn’t be recommending it for the performance.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kerian Halcyon

    Normally I wouldn't count this as 'read' seeing as I listened to it via Librivox's audio recordings, but I thought I'd do a review of this nonetheless. Though this rating is low compared to what I normally like to read or listen to, The Land That Time Forgot and its two sister novels are part of a dying genre of books that largely fascinate me to no end, and honestly to me mimics the sad truth of a dying interest in the mysteries of our planet and nearby solar system. It's part of the American h Normally I wouldn't count this as 'read' seeing as I listened to it via Librivox's audio recordings, but I thought I'd do a review of this nonetheless. Though this rating is low compared to what I normally like to read or listen to, The Land That Time Forgot and its two sister novels are part of a dying genre of books that largely fascinate me to no end, and honestly to me mimics the sad truth of a dying interest in the mysteries of our planet and nearby solar system. It's part of the American heritage; that desire to explore the unknown, to colonize those vast wildernesses, to meet new peoples and learn of new cultures, and to survive against the various monsters that lurk there, and it's something that we shouldn't forget; lest we lull ourselves to complacency and wind up just as boring or just as frustrated as Europe, Asia, and those other cultures that our ancestors left behind. The Land That Time Forgot is not for everybody. In this liberal world where anyone and everyone expects even our ancestors to conform to their ridiculous standards of 'equality' Burroughs work will likely offend, as it focuses on a train of thought and science largely considered obsolete today and was the same train of thought that made Nazi Germany the hated monster that history makes of it today. However if you push past that and mature up, realize that the standards back then do not apply to today, you'll find that it's a generally enjoyable read. It's got all the bells and whistles of a traditional American adventure novel; the rich, lost cowboy, the attractive damsel in distress, the evil would-be German Officer husband, and, of course, the weird and wacky landscape that they must explore. Caspak, that strange lost continent far towards the ice cap in the Southern Pacific, is honestly a neat focus on the idea of what would happen if Christian Fundamentalists were right and the antediluvian nature of the past revealed that every fossil and every creature found in stone lived side by side with one another along with man, though still approaches the subject with an, albeit primitive, aspect of evolution thrown into the mix. The concepts are fairly interesting and easy to grasp, though the only turn-off I had at all was the really ancient depiction of dinosaurs as dumb lizards rather than the varied creatures we know that they are today. In any case, Caspak's strange world and unique biology combined with the primitive societies that live there make it an interesting subject to read on, and makes me wish that we had more Caspaks out there in modern literature to read about.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Edgar Rice Burroughs is quickly becoming a part of my Authors-I-Regularly-Take-Promenades-With club. His creations are the stuff dreams are made of--if you're lucky and have awesome dreams. This is the first book in the Caspak series, which made its appearance in three installments in the Blue Book Magazine in 1918. I seem to particularly enjoy novels that are stories within stories. For instance, in "Land", a man tells us about how he found a message in a bottle. He proceeds to show us the manu Edgar Rice Burroughs is quickly becoming a part of my Authors-I-Regularly-Take-Promenades-With club. His creations are the stuff dreams are made of--if you're lucky and have awesome dreams. This is the first book in the Caspak series, which made its appearance in three installments in the Blue Book Magazine in 1918. I seem to particularly enjoy novels that are stories within stories. For instance, in "Land", a man tells us about how he found a message in a bottle. He proceeds to show us the manuscript that he'd found inside, and this makes up the whole of the novel. Burroughs is fantastic at giving his readers a complete contrast in genres within the same story. In "Land", the discovered manuscript immediately throws the reader into the middle of a WWI sea skirmish between an American passenger cruise and a German U-Boat. It's action packed and thrilling. The narrator holds nothing back in modesty, quickly taking to becoming the commander of the German U-Boat (he and his father were shipbuilders and had constructed the very same U-33 upon which the castaways found themselves) and describing his fighting prowess as easily as if it had been another's. If you've read the Barsoom series, E.R.B.'s narrator John Carter is also quite the fighter. It seems Tyler's only failings seem to be in wooing the fair maiden he first rescues upon the sinking of the passenger craft. But Burroughs loves giving us heroines that never quite fit the picture of the fainting damsel, Lys La Rue instead holding her own in the numerous skirmishes in the novel. Quickly, we're thrust into a hidden world that exists on a large island in the middle of the ocean, where dinosaurs and other terrifying beasts roam alongside human-like beings that show an array of evolution from ape to man. The more north the castaways journey, the less ape-like the tribes appear. It's a fascinating, and sometimes slightly dated, picture of a world lost in modern society. The novel is action packed, entertaining, and a quick read. As always, Burroughs likes a good love story. His hero needs a woman to stay alive for, it seems, in everything I've read of his so far. And I've yet to find fault in it. There are interesting twists and every so often I'd find myself grinning at the wit infused in Burroughs' words. I highly recommend this one if you have a long, rainy afternoon.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    The Caspak trilogy, comprising The Land that Time Forgot, The People that Time Forgot, and Out of Time's Abyss, is classic Edgar Rice Burroughs adventure. The three stories trace the adventures of three typical Burroughs heroes (two Americans and an Englishman, all three wondrously brave man's men who get tongue-tied around pretty women) in the land of Caspak, a Lost World teeming with primordial life. It is Burroughs, so you do have to turn off your 21st-century sensibilities to some extent. Tha The Caspak trilogy, comprising The Land that Time Forgot, The People that Time Forgot, and Out of Time's Abyss, is classic Edgar Rice Burroughs adventure. The three stories trace the adventures of three typical Burroughs heroes (two Americans and an Englishman, all three wondrously brave man's men who get tongue-tied around pretty women) in the land of Caspak, a Lost World teeming with primordial life. It is Burroughs, so you do have to turn off your 21st-century sensibilities to some extent. That accomplished, however, you can proceed to enjoy a rollicking good set of adventure yarns done in typical Burroughs style, with a series of cliffhangers and narrow escapes. I recommend the books to those who are fond of this style of adventure novel.

  7. 5 out of 5

    MB Taylor

    Fun adventure from Edgar Rice Burroughs fairly early in his career (1918). It's really 3 adventures in one, and when Ace reprinted it/them in the 60s, it was as three books: The Land That Time Forgot, The People That Time Forgot and Out of Time's Abyss. I'm sure I read these sometime in the 70s; I remember buying up almost any ERB books I could find and at that time Ace seemed like it was trying to get everything Burroughs wrote into print. It was a good time to be a fan. The story is pretty typic Fun adventure from Edgar Rice Burroughs fairly early in his career (1918). It's really 3 adventures in one, and when Ace reprinted it/them in the 60s, it was as three books: The Land That Time Forgot, The People That Time Forgot and Out of Time's Abyss. I'm sure I read these sometime in the 70s; I remember buying up almost any ERB books I could find and at that time Ace seemed like it was trying to get everything Burroughs wrote into print. It was a good time to be a fan. The story is pretty typical Burroughs fare. A modern man (or three modern men, in this case) end up in a primitive environment having to fight off strange creatures (dinosaurs and prehistoric mammals, mostly, in this case) and strange almost human people. And is usually the case, some of the almost human people are human enough to fall in love with; although their strange evolutionary way of aging makes one wonder how it will work out in the end. I suppose we don't really need to worry though, IIRC the people of Barsoom lay eggs and still Dejah Thoris and John Carter managed to have children. As is usually the case for a Burroughs tale, the clueless guys take forever to realize that they've fallen in love, but it all works out in the end. Burroughs knew a winning formula for an adventure story, and he used it frequently. Fortunately the action is pretty much non-stop so one hardly notices or when one does, one hardly cares.

  8. 5 out of 5

    k.wing

    Oh man, I love Burroughs. Some terms and musings of Bowen are, regrettably, outdated, but I looked past those to enjoy this awesome adventure. I love the concept of seeing man evolve from tribe to tribe. Can't wait to read the second one! Also this. Major LOL. “Californians, as a rule, are familiar with ju-jutsu, and I especially had made a study of it for several years, both at school and in the gym of the Los Angeles Athletic Club, while recently I had had, in my employ, a Jap who was a wonder Oh man, I love Burroughs. Some terms and musings of Bowen are, regrettably, outdated, but I looked past those to enjoy this awesome adventure. I love the concept of seeing man evolve from tribe to tribe. Can't wait to read the second one! Also this. Major LOL. “Californians, as a rule, are familiar with ju-jutsu, and I especially had made a study of it for several years, both at school and in the gym of the Los Angeles Athletic Club, while recently I had had, in my employ, a Jap who was a wonder at the art.” Note to self: this review is only for The Land that Time Forgot. Unfortunately there is not a separate listing for the book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    This is actually the narrative of Bowen J. Tyler and his adventures and mis-adventures in the strange land of Caprona. It starts with Tyler, an American being a passenger on a ship in the English Channel, this is during World War I and unfortunately the ship is torpedoed by a German submarine called U-33. After the ship is sunk Tyler and one other passenger Lys La Rue are rescued by a British tug boat..... alot occurs here, the tug boat is sunk, the crew captures the sub, the sub is overcome by This is actually the narrative of Bowen J. Tyler and his adventures and mis-adventures in the strange land of Caprona. It starts with Tyler, an American being a passenger on a ship in the English Channel, this is during World War I and unfortunately the ship is torpedoed by a German submarine called U-33. After the ship is sunk Tyler and one other passenger Lys La Rue are rescued by a British tug boat..... alot occurs here, the tug boat is sunk, the crew captures the sub, the sub is overcome by a strange current, and then they come upon Caprona.....

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elar

    Three different stories bound together by same mystic land of strange human races and many action packed quests. For me first thing what came to mind was that it is like Jules Verne writing Ringworld novel :P and Burroughs likes the idea of human hatching :).

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brian Rogers

    I had planned to read one book in this series one at a time with things in between but Burroughs is such a damn engaging storyteller that once I built up momentum in book 1, well, book 2 was just sitting there. so I'll do a second review of the compiled set. The first book in the series, "Land that Time Forgot", grew on me as I read the other two in the series - they all tie together with different characters in overlapping frames in the timeline, and stuff from the first book pays off handsomely I had planned to read one book in this series one at a time with things in between but Burroughs is such a damn engaging storyteller that once I built up momentum in book 1, well, book 2 was just sitting there. so I'll do a second review of the compiled set. The first book in the series, "Land that Time Forgot", grew on me as I read the other two in the series - they all tie together with different characters in overlapping frames in the timeline, and stuff from the first book pays off handsomely in the third, "Out of Time's Abyss", which is quite good. There is a slow unraveling of the mysteries of Caspak's ecosystem, but if you are expecting a science fiction explanation for the wacky way this island works, well, don't get your hopes up. But since ERB is much more of an action writer than anything like a scientist. no, really. Anything like a scientist. I do have to point out that the hero of the second book, The People That Time Forgot, while a classic pulp hero and capable adventurer, is a world class doofus. Finally, it was written in 1918. Keep that in mind when thinking about geopolitics and race relations.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tweety

    3 1/2 The People that Time Forgot was the best of them, and the last page of Out Of Time's Abyss was also great. But the entire time I read the book I kept seeing Plastic Dinosaurs. Maybe because my copy has pictures from the movie that look super fake? Anyway, in this case I can definitely say nostalgia didn't prove true and the cover was better that the book it's self. The only one I'd reread it the middle one. On a whole not bad, but not Tarzan great either. PG Some killing of beasts and peop 3 1/2 The People that Time Forgot was the best of them, and the last page of Out Of Time's Abyss was also great. But the entire time I read the book I kept seeing Plastic Dinosaurs. Maybe because my copy has pictures from the movie that look super fake? Anyway, in this case I can definitely say nostalgia didn't prove true and the cover was better that the book it's self. The only one I'd reread it the middle one. On a whole not bad, but not Tarzan great either. PG Some killing of beasts and people, the violence was on a whole mild. The last book had more than the others. (It also had nastier creatures)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

    The Caspak books, now those bring back some memories. Caspak is a lost world. Our hero has stumbled onto it (I think by submarine). The concept is that the further the hero travels in a certain direction the more or less evolved all of the creatures are. The action is a fight for survival as the hero encounters dinosaurs and cavemen. This is everything a growing boy needed in the 1970s, possibly for current generations as well. I don't know. My son liked them. The Caspak books, now those bring back some memories. Caspak is a lost world. Our hero has stumbled onto it (I think by submarine). The concept is that the further the hero travels in a certain direction the more or less evolved all of the creatures are. The action is a fight for survival as the hero encounters dinosaurs and cavemen. This is everything a growing boy needed in the 1970s, possibly for current generations as well. I don't know. My son liked them.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Salerno

    There aren't enough dinosaur novels in the world and I hoped I would enjoy Edgar Rice Burroughs' Caspak Trilogy. Sadly I was terribly disappointed. All three books are very similar structurally and thematically. Burroughs had his formula and he stuck to it. I enjoy pulp adventure fiction, but for whatever reason Burroughs style just doesn't click with me. Simply put, it hasn't aged well. The characters are flat and simplistic and the the plotting is predictable. Burroughs has a reputation for wr There aren't enough dinosaur novels in the world and I hoped I would enjoy Edgar Rice Burroughs' Caspak Trilogy. Sadly I was terribly disappointed. All three books are very similar structurally and thematically. Burroughs had his formula and he stuck to it. I enjoy pulp adventure fiction, but for whatever reason Burroughs style just doesn't click with me. Simply put, it hasn't aged well. The characters are flat and simplistic and the the plotting is predictable. Burroughs has a reputation for writing swashbucking action but I found large portions of these stories unbearably dull. I was similarly disappointed with his other famous novel A Princess of Mars. Surprisingly for a series about a lost continent, there are hardly any dinosaurs in these books! There are a total of three dinosaur encounters in the entire trilogy. The bulk of the action and plot revolve around the various tribes of hominins who inhabit Caspak and how they relate to one another. At certain points, these books feel less like an adventure series and more like a vehicle for Burroughs' strange ideas about race and evolution. All I can say is that, if you are a dinosaur enthusiast like myself, skip this series and read Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World instead. Doyle's novel is superior in every way and much more entertaining.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kris

    Burroughs's love of evolution shines through in this fast tale filled with constant danger, romantic deeds, and heroic escapes. All the characters get out of all the scrapes just in the nick of time, and they sail away after coincidentally finding everything they need. Even the timeline towards the end seemed a little dubious. It's showy and flashy and exciting, but take away the setting, and what have you got? Boring people. Between the constant reminder of the dangerous, ferocious, huge animal Burroughs's love of evolution shines through in this fast tale filled with constant danger, romantic deeds, and heroic escapes. All the characters get out of all the scrapes just in the nick of time, and they sail away after coincidentally finding everything they need. Even the timeline towards the end seemed a little dubious. It's showy and flashy and exciting, but take away the setting, and what have you got? Boring people. Between the constant reminder of the dangerous, ferocious, huge animals hunting you, and the beautiful, half-naked, apparently savage, loyal female companions running around ready to join your crew, there wasn't much room for very deep character development. If you like science fiction a lot, then sure, it's a classic, but I'll take some Wells or Verne any day. Perhaps Burroughs was groundbreaking in his writing style, but I still feel a little gypped after all the time I spent reading this book. I guess I hadn't remembered it was really three entire books in one, so it just drudged on and on. Every long chapter ends on a cliff-hanger, but I still never much cared for what would happen next. I know he'd feed me some other cockamamie explanation with unnecessary details and implausible circumstances. (It's like the old Star Treks where you know all the meaningless guys dressed in red will die, but your main lovable heroes manage to stay alive and look good doing it. Funny and lovable for a time, but it's only the foundation for something greater. You can't watch this stuff constantly.)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    The Land That Time Forgot felt so brief to me! I expected it to be longer; I feel like it was over in 10 minutes. But, I really enjoyed it. Caspak is so full of life, literally teeming, and the land is so curious. I like the way that it is narrated, there is no dramatic irony, you learn things about the land at the same time as the narrator, Bowen, does. This was nice, it encouraged curiosity and wonder and a feeling of camaraderie with Bowen. I like the strange worldview of the people who live The Land That Time Forgot felt so brief to me! I expected it to be longer; I feel like it was over in 10 minutes. But, I really enjoyed it. Caspak is so full of life, literally teeming, and the land is so curious. I like the way that it is narrated, there is no dramatic irony, you learn things about the land at the same time as the narrator, Bowen, does. This was nice, it encouraged curiosity and wonder and a feeling of camaraderie with Bowen. I like the strange worldview of the people who live there (a strange concept of the stages of life and evolution) and I'm sure that this will be developed in the following books? This lost a star for me simply because it was so short. I'm wondering now if I have accidentally read an abridged version? I feel like there's so much to be developed - But I suppose that with first person narration we cannot know any more than our protagonist, and he doesn't know much. I guess that's what the sequels will be for!

  17. 4 out of 5

    bup

    A second or third-grader would love this - there's non-stop action, and not much thought behind the world Burroughs created here, except as was driven by the thought "What would a second or third grader find exciting!?" Make no mistake, I love me some prehistoric life, and I don't mind the cold-blooded lizardy version of dinosaurs that ruled thought at the time Burroughs wrote, but there's like 25 big dinos per acre! All carnivores! The book isn't satisfying on its own, either - it's so clearly se A second or third-grader would love this - there's non-stop action, and not much thought behind the world Burroughs created here, except as was driven by the thought "What would a second or third grader find exciting!?" Make no mistake, I love me some prehistoric life, and I don't mind the cold-blooded lizardy version of dinosaurs that ruled thought at the time Burroughs wrote, but there's like 25 big dinos per acre! All carnivores! The book isn't satisfying on its own, either - it's so clearly setting up a series, that I guess he didn't mind much that the central conflicts in this one were never really resolved. And, by the way, the views of the evolution of man leave it pretty clear that Burroughs felt white people are more evolved than other races. So there's that. Oh, well. Thanks for Tarzan and John Carter of Mars, Edgar. You can keep Caspak.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Danna

    "There were all sorts and conditions of horrible things; huge, hideous, grotesque monsters...I had perhaps the fraction of a second longer to live when I heard an angry growl behind us mingle with a cry of pain and rage from the giant..." Classic pulp fiction! What Land of the Lost aspired to be! Hilariously fun!!! Like an action-adventure popcorn movie! Mine is the 1924 Grosset & Dunlap edition, stained and worn with the cover half falling off; not the Commemorative Edition shown here. There's "There were all sorts and conditions of horrible things; huge, hideous, grotesque monsters...I had perhaps the fraction of a second longer to live when I heard an angry growl behind us mingle with a cry of pain and rage from the giant..." Classic pulp fiction! What Land of the Lost aspired to be! Hilariously fun!!! Like an action-adventure popcorn movie! Mine is the 1924 Grosset & Dunlap edition, stained and worn with the cover half falling off; not the Commemorative Edition shown here. There's something pleasing about reading a really old book; the feel and smell of the old pages, different for every one, adds something to the experience.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laz the Sailor

    These are basically love stories. They also contain some wildly creative alternate takes on evolution and how to be a proper gentleman when faced with a T Rex. These stories are not as well known as ERB's Tarzan and John Carter series, and they lack the character development, but they are entertaining in their own way. These are basically love stories. They also contain some wildly creative alternate takes on evolution and how to be a proper gentleman when faced with a T Rex. These stories are not as well known as ERB's Tarzan and John Carter series, and they lack the character development, but they are entertaining in their own way.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jarrad

    While not written with quite the excitement and fantasy of his John Carter series, this book is still quite entertaining; and has not managed to become obsolete with the advancement of technology the way some of our other favorite or classical fantasy literature has.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    really a 3.5 for me. Great pulp but clearly not Burroughs best (not for me anyway). still fun characters the frame recalling the Lusitania was a neat idea (I thought), and the novel take on evolution was inspired (and really original from a sci-fi POV).

  22. 4 out of 5

    David Lever

    Some of my fondest memories as a youth are those I spent reading Edgar Rice Burroughs. This was the first book of his I read. I think I went on to read his entire collection.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Nichol

    This is a wonderful story. i finally got round to reading it and it is certainly much better than the Doug McLure movie from the '70s. Talk about high action and excellent writing. This is a wonderful story. i finally got round to reading it and it is certainly much better than the Doug McLure movie from the '70s. Talk about high action and excellent writing.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diana Iozzia

    "The Land That Time Forgot" Review written by Diana Iozzia I hadn’t known much about this trilogy before I had picked up a copy at Barnes and Noble (a year ago). I decided to read it this past week, because I absolutely love science fiction, but I don’t read it often enough. I was much more impressed with this than I thought. With this being a series of three stories from the 1910s decade, I expected verbose, beautiful imagery and descriptive narratives. I did not realize I would be able to read s "The Land That Time Forgot" Review written by Diana Iozzia I hadn’t known much about this trilogy before I had picked up a copy at Barnes and Noble (a year ago). I decided to read it this past week, because I absolutely love science fiction, but I don’t read it often enough. I was much more impressed with this than I thought. With this being a series of three stories from the 1910s decade, I expected verbose, beautiful imagery and descriptive narratives. I did not realize I would be able to read such a wonderfully written trilogy, with many perspectives, characters, and a terrifying and interesting lost island. To speak about the series, I will write about each book in the series. Near the end of the full review, you will read the notes I took and opinions I formed, as marked by post-it note page tag as I read through the book. They will be written in the order of the book’s progression, so if you feel they may spoil you in any way, please don’t read the notes section. Thank you and please continue on. “The Land That Time Forgot” (LTF) “LTF” begins the series, kicking off with a fascinating series of events involving its first main character, Bowen Tyler and his dog, Nobs, as they encounter German u-bombs and rival ships in the Great War. The two must battle for survival in the water, mutiny on the ship, and deception. Bowen is starting to fall in love with a woman, Lys, he rescues in the water. To be honest, he’s really quite creepy towards her in the beginning. It’s very “why doesn’t she love me? I’m so interesting and intelligent. Oh, and I’m not great with social cues, blah.” Tyler, Nobs, Lys, the Englishmen, and the Germans land on the island of Caprona, which is called Caspak by the ape-people who live on the island. In LTF, we learn about the interesting evolutionary patterns of the ape-people who live on the island. From my understanding, it seems to follow the ape evolution chart, that image we’ve all seen of monkeys progressing into the human. LTF sets up the island, introducing us to the dangerous dinosaurs, the pterodactyls, and the much larger and more dangerous predator animals (lions, bears, tigers, lizards, etc.). As I mentioned, we learn a little of the ape dynamic, not actually seeing typical apes that we know in our lifetime. The ape-people progress in the evolutionary pattern. The lesser apes use primitive tools, higher ones use spears, ropes, and more. “The People That Time Forgot” “PTF” is much more of an interesting novel in the trilogy. It is set up to describe Tom Billings and his crew that he brings to the island to find Bowen Tyler and Lys. Tom Billings meets a Galu, named Ajor, who is of the breed that is closest to humans. She also is very fearful of Wieroos. They are almost God-like, but we learn much more about them in the third novel. Ajor was the daughter of a Galu, Jor, who was hidden from birth. Wieroos take Galu females to capture them, make them into wives, and sacrifice them to the god, Luata. Tom teaches Ajor his language, and she teaches hers, which is a wonderful scene by a campfire, with (guess who?!) Nobs laying and sleeping beside them. I really like this coupling. Tom and Ajor are sweet and loving and protective of each other, in comparison to the other couples in the trilogy, in which the man seems to be more obsessed than loving. I think the most interesting aspects of PTF is not the rescue story, but the learning of the Luata / Wieroo religion, the language, and the evolutionary patterns of the ape-men on the island. Ajor, Tom, and Nobs fight many different tribes, make some friends and enemies, and continue on. I don’t want to spoil the end of their story, but it iiiiss a rescue story. “Out of Time’s Abyss” “OTA” follows Bradley and his team as they try to find Tom Billings, Bowen Tyler, and Lys. They were the team that had originally came with Tom, but they were separated at the beginning of PTF. Bradley is a tough, no-nonsense survivalist, who has a very hot temper. He kills anything in his way and hardly tries to learn about the island. He meets (of course) a Galu named Co-Tan, but throughout the book, he views it more as a protective relationship than romantic (until the end). Bradley has unfortunately found his way into the city of Ooh-Oh, which is where the Wieroos live, worshipping Luata. Their leader is He/Him Who Speaks for Luata. Bradley meets Co-Tan’s brother in their prison, and eventually sets him free. Bradley attempts to find his way back to Fort Dinosaur, which seemed to be the meeting place where Bowen Tyler and crew had set up a small fort of houses. I think the Wieroos are very interesting, the cult-like dynamic of these winged humans. (Yes, humans!) They are the true closest relatives of the human characters we follow. However, they are the cruelest. Now, I will be listing my notes and possible spoilers, so please do not read on if you worry you may be spoiled by anything. “The Land that Time Forgot” • The humor in this trilogy is pretty good, but Bowen Tyler himself can be over the top, seeming to think that he is very funny. • As I mentioned before, Bowen is very creepy and “friend-zone”-y to Lys. He tries to dissuade Lys from being interested in any of the crewmen, but of course this is justified because the crewmen betray him. Bowen Tyler has the fantastic ability to do exactly what will work out in the end. Ugh. Many of these male characters have this ability as well. Sorry, but I think a hero should have at least a small struggle, that he’s not completely skilled and successful in every attempt. • The first time they see the island. Just all of the initial descriptions are beautiful and so realistic. I’m very reminiscent of Jurassic Park and King Kong during these opening chapters. • The creatures of the island. It’s interesting to see how our main characters interact with not-so-extinct-anymore creatures. I just really like dinosaurs and prehistoric animals so… • There are too many close calls where it seems Nobs will die. • I understand that hunting animals for survival is necessary, and I’m really glad the moments are not gratuitous and too detailed. I think I’d be disheartened to read graphic hunting scenes. • There are some great moments in LTF where our characters walk into a precarious position, rather than the action occurring once they arrive. I like these types of scenes, because they seem realistic. (pg. 68) • I’m not a fan of lines that describe what will happen in the future, if the narrative is written in past tense. For example, if a character says that something bad will happen at the end of the chapter. I have a big rant about that in my review of Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita” on Goodreads, if you’re interested in a further explanation. • Cheesy dialogue: “Tell me in words how much you love me.” “I love you beyond all conception”. • YES. We understand that it’s strange we don’t often see young children or older ape people. It doesn’t have to mention this confusion every chapter. Clearly, if it’s going to be explained in the future, there is no need to continue on about it. • So many moments of deux ex machina throughout the books. “The People That Time Forgot” • The endings of LTF and PTF confused me. It took me a couple of times reading the pages to understand how Bowen’s manuscript arrived and that Tom Billings and team were coming to rescue. • Why send so many people if you know the first time splitting up went poorly? • Also, whoever is narrating the first chapter of PTF is clearly unknown. I looked it up on Wikipedia, and people surmised it’s a cameo from the author. • I think it’s very interesting how each main character (Bowen Tyler, Tom Billings, and Bradley) all describe the same things on the island differently. All of the characters are very different and well-written even if I only care for Tom Billings. • As I mentioned earlier, the dynamic between Tom Billings and his beloved Ajor is really great. It’s not creepy or uncomfortable. You can tell that Tom Billings really respects her, and she trusts him so deeply. • Edgar Rice Burroughs clearly put so much thought into the evolutionary patterns of the apes, how certain apes would need certain weapons, and their evolved bodies. For example, Alus are beaded, Bo-Lu women don’t have beards, and Stolu-men have stubble, and Band-Lu do not have hair. • Naturally, this trilogy can be a little sexist in places, but I like that Tom encourages Ajor to learn how to defend herself. Also, I like that she doesn’t always listen to his instructions to stay in one place, or to stay quiet. She’s a great character. “Out of Time’s Abyss” • Honestly, this is my least favorite of the books, but I still really enjoy them all. I just think that I enjoyed the second so much, I think I was just a little let down. • Bradley is the epitome of the character who does whatever he can to survive: stealing weapons, murder, escaping prison, killing ape-people without a second thought. I understand the mentality, but he comes off as cruel and cold. He’d be a good Arnold Schwarzenegger character. • The Wieroos’ city is creepy and eerie. It’s a great “villain’s den” / “badlands” / Hell landscape. • Bradley has hardly any difficulty understanding the Galus and Wieroos, so where did those groups originally learn the English language? Hmmm. • An-Tak’s sendoff was sad, but it showed heart in Bradley that seemed to be nonexistent. • I’m glad the last show-down in the book where the Englishmen re-met the Germans happened the way it did. I sort of forgot about the Germans, so I’m glad it was addressed well with a good conclusion. • This note is for all of the books. My copy has a great glossary of all the terms, language, places, and characters. There’s a nice map that Edgar Rice Burroughs had drawn. It’s hard to read, but it’s much cooler than a computer generated map. Honestly, I haven’t read a book in a very long time, at least six months, where I had realized that the book would become a new favorite book. It was great reading through and realizing how much I liked it. It’s very rare that one of the books I read receives a 5 star review. A 5 star review is usually reserved for one of my favorite books that I will keep in my collection and read in the future. I’m so glad I took the time to read this. I also own “Tarzan of the Apes” and “Hollow Earth” by Edgar Rice Burroughs, so I plan to read them as well soon. Thank you for reading my review! *I purchased my own copy of this book.*

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael Battaglia

    Because part of me is perpetually ten years old, I will always be a sucker for "Lost World" type novels, all those stories of people winding up on remote islands or lost continents or hidden sections of the Arctic and finding a land full of extinct creatures, especially dinosaurs, who make everything better simply by being large and scaly and awesome in a way that mythological creatures so rarely are. For me, the better examples of this sub-genre of pseudo-science adventure are the ones written i Because part of me is perpetually ten years old, I will always be a sucker for "Lost World" type novels, all those stories of people winding up on remote islands or lost continents or hidden sections of the Arctic and finding a land full of extinct creatures, especially dinosaurs, who make everything better simply by being large and scaly and awesome in a way that mythological creatures so rarely are. For me, the better examples of this sub-genre of pseudo-science adventure are the ones written in the early days of the last century (or the waning days of the century before) simply because in a world that hadn't been fully explored it seemed quite plausible that one day we would come across a previously unknown continent teeming with life no one had ever imagined. And since Australia was already settled, people had to look elsewhere. I have no idea how much the authors themselves believed in their own concepts but the possibilities of the thinking of the time in context seems to add an extra weight and charm to the proceedings. Much like when everyone believed there was potentially life on Mars, that veneer of possible reality, no matter how far-fetched, tickled a sense of adventure that went a little bit beyond entertainment. These days, we have Dan Brown. You make the call. For most people, Burroughs is the guy who created Tarzan and is indirectly responsible for the movie about John Carter, although we really can't hold that against him. But like many other pulp writers, he churned out stories like a fiend. Not everything was the same decent quality but some of the stories have enough imagination and flair to lift them above the more pedestrian stuff. This is one that people tend to remember fondly, basically a novel in three parts (despite the habit of publishers at one point to split it like a trilogy, which anyone making the mistake of reading them separately will realize makes no sense) and all of them involving the same wonderful land where men get to be men, women get to be like men except when they need to be ladies, and there's plenty of creatures about lusting for combat. While it's fairly easy to dump a bunch of guys in a mysterious land filled with dinosaurs, it's not as easy as you'd think to make it interesting and even harder to make it entertainment. There's a fine line to walk between having the heroes fight an endless parade of monsters and turning the novel into a travelogue as the author checks off the places he's made up to ensure said heroes visit every single one. Splitting the novel up actually covers both bases . . . if he tried to tell it as one sustained four hundred page narrative, the pace would no doubt falter and you'd start to get dinosaur fatigue. By giving each section its own protagonist (with a lady to liven things up) and area of the land to explore, we get to essentially hit the reboot button every hundred and fifty pages or so and start fresh with a clean slate, ready to go diving into savage combat again. This allows Burroughs to vary the scenery and perils . . . by populating Caspak with several different tribes of people, all at various stages of evolutionary development, not only does he give the reader a built-in mystery but it ensures everyone isn't having the same converation over and over again. Which is good, because you wonder when everyone has time to stop and talk. As it typical with a pulp novel, the action more or less hits the ground running and never lets up, but not where you'd expect. Starting out by staking out its place in the ultra-narrow genre of WWI-submarine-mysterious island adventures, our heroes set out on a cruise before running into a pesky German U-boat (one of the interesting aspects of this, as SF-esque WWI adventures aren't super common, especially in this case where the Great War is still fresh in everyone's memories). The submarine shennanigans go on longer than you'd expect but once they hit the island the story becomes all business. Each of the parts has its own charms. The first has the submarine hijinks and a sort of fun opposites attract subplot. The narrator for the second segment is a bit more level-headed and features some explanations for the weird mystery of how the different tribes are connected. The third dispenses with first person entirely but has some eerie set-pieces (set in the city with the flying people, reminiscent of the strange creatures from Gene Wolfe's "Book of the Short Sun" series) and probably ventures the closest to the Conan the Barbarian territory before wrapping everything up with an explanation that is rooted in science at the time (i.e. it makes little sense but I give him credit for trying instead of saying "it's magical!"). The little links disguise the fact that we're basically reading three novellas and almost wallpaper over the fact that we're essentially reading the same plot three times (burly man gets lost, finds attractive woman and falls in love, fights off creatures, makes friends along the way). What distinguishes it is Burroughs strong sense of place and eye for detail, rendering a land that is lush and dangerous, flush with mystery and a chance for a man to survive on his own wits. Burroughs won't win any fancy prose awards (although the third part has some startling scenes and desciptions, including a particularly gruesome and brutal bayonet stabbing) but it's that unflagging pace that keeps you reading (if one were so inclined this is the kind of book that could be devoured) and if there's anything that attacts us to it today, it may because it triggers the faint hope that in a world that has been explored and satellite mapped to the nth degree, there may remain pockets that exist purely to be discovered, and mysteries yet to be plumbed, dark places on the rustling underside of memory, just out of reach.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Lorence

    “You are here for but an instant, and you mustn't take yourself too seriously” “You are here for but an instant, and you mustn't take yourself too seriously”

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    This is a re-read of some books that I read when I was in middle school. While the story can be engaging, there are clearly lots of negative racist undertones playing out.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Quicksilver Quill

    The Caspak trilogy is a wonderful work by Edgar Rice Burroughs comprised of three short novels, all set on an unforgettable island called Caprona, also known as Caspak. These tales overlap with each other and have interconnecting characters and threads, but are also somewhat distinct, each told in its own style and from its own unique perspective. The Land That Time Forgot The Land That Time Forgot, the first book in the trilogy, is an Edgar Rice Burroughs masterpiece. In this extraordinary adven The Caspak trilogy is a wonderful work by Edgar Rice Burroughs comprised of three short novels, all set on an unforgettable island called Caprona, also known as Caspak. These tales overlap with each other and have interconnecting characters and threads, but are also somewhat distinct, each told in its own style and from its own unique perspective. The Land That Time Forgot The Land That Time Forgot, the first book in the trilogy, is an Edgar Rice Burroughs masterpiece. In this extraordinary adventure you can expect some of the usual Burroughs tropes: wonderful characters—from the beautiful and alluring Lys La Rue, to the heroic action man Bowen Tyler, to the villainous German U-boat captain Baron von Schoenvorts, to even the lovable and faithful Airedale named Nobs. The story itself is packed full of incredible twists and turns, which play out against a backdrop of mystery and suspense, all delivered in a creative and exciting narrative. Going into this tale, I didn’t know what to expect aside from some kind of ‘Lost World’ type of novel. It is that and then some. The first person narration from the stalwart and likeable Bowen Tyler immediately draws you in, and the adventure never really stops once it gets started. Just getting to the island of Caprona is an adventure in itself. Cinematic in scope and epic in its feel, this short novel nonetheless moves at lightning pace as our heroes confront danger after danger, trying to survive by their wits and courage. The pace seldom if ever lags, and there seems to be a new surprise around every corner, building toward an unforgettable climax. The People That Time Forgot Picking up where its predecessor left off but with a new cast of characters, The People That Time Forgot is a worthy sequel to The Land That Time Forgot and continues the tradition of thrilling adventure as Tom Billings—the personal secretary and assistant to Bowen Tyler’s father—sets off with an expedition to Caprona to locate and rescue his castaway friend, Bowen Tyler. Having a new character take the lead helps to bring back some of the surprise and suspense of visiting the island of Caprona, which would probably have been lost if Burroughs had merely continued telling the tale from Bowen Tyler’s perspective. This story deals more with the various tribes of Caspak that Tom Billings encounters in his search for Tyler, as well as with the quite frankly outré form of evolution that takes place on the island. Sometimes you wonder how Burroughs came up with all this stuff! A special emphasis is also placed on Billings’s relationship with the stunningly beautiful Galu woman named Ajor, forming a nice romantic subplot. While perhaps lacking some of the surprise and punch of its predecessor, The People That Time Forgot is nonetheless an exciting read and an interesting adventure in its own right. Since less time is spent journeying to Caprona in this story, Burroughs is able to spend more time exploring its lands and people—all of whom are not exactly savory characters. This is a fitting sequel to the first book of the Caspak trilogy, and it almost feels as if it could conclude the series, except that there is still one missing link, one final piece of the puzzle to be filled in before we can move . . . Out of Time’s Abyss The climactic finale of the Caspak trilogy, Out of Time’s Abyss is possibly the strangest, most creative, and most intense of the three books. Choosing an interesting and quite unexpected plotline, in this tale Burroughs follows the adventures of Bradley and his small group of men who had set out on an exploratory expedition in the first book only to disappear, their fate unknown . . . until now. This was a great premise, although initially it took me a moment to remember exactly who Bradley was since I did not read all three books back to back. This novel deals especially with the mysterious Weiroos—strange winged creatures that ply the skies of Caspak, which were only hinted at in the previous books. In this tale there are some truly unforgettable scenes of fear and suspense, and the genre almost verges on horror with some of the intense visuals and situations that Bradley encounters. The Weiroos alone make this book a worthwhile read, but throw in yet another of Burroughs’s seemingly endless line of beautiful and winsome female characters—in this case, the lovely Galu girl Co-Tan—and the charm of the story compounds again. Being the finale of the series, all the loose ends are tied up in a satisfying way, but you almost wonder if Burroughs could have extended the Caspak trilogy into one of his long, endless series. Then again, maybe short and sweet is best! At any rate, this was a fun one—and quite a fitting conclusion to a fascinating and unforgettable trilogy.

  29. 5 out of 5

    John

    THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT: Surprisingly, this novel works best in its initial chapters, before the characters reach dinosaur island. Once they finally do, things take an abrupt turn for the campy. Charles Darwin certainly didn't do this book any favors, as evolution is the driving force behind what makes much of this story both silly an inherently racist. Burroughs obviously believed that whites were the most evolved people on the planet, while blacks had barely come down from the trees. I normal THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT: Surprisingly, this novel works best in its initial chapters, before the characters reach dinosaur island. Once they finally do, things take an abrupt turn for the campy. Charles Darwin certainly didn't do this book any favors, as evolution is the driving force behind what makes much of this story both silly an inherently racist. Burroughs obviously believed that whites were the most evolved people on the planet, while blacks had barely come down from the trees. I normally wouldn't give a book this racist a passing grade; but I realize that Burroughs was a product of his times, and I'm willing to cut him a little slack. The book is worth reading, if not for the dinosaurs, then for the cool bits about hijacking a German submarine. THE PEOPLE THAT TIME FORGOT: THE PEOPLE THAT TIME FORGOT is an absurd (and unintentionally funny) sequel to Burrough's marginal classic, THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT. People hoping for something along the lines of Michael Crichton's JURASSIC PARK or Arthur Conan Doyle's THE LOST WORLD will be severely disappointed. Yet, there is an element of fun to be had here, especially if you treat it like an old-fashioned YA novel and grant it the same kind of leeway as you would, say, a PERCY JACKSON adventure. Interestingly, it took people in the first Caspak story half the book just to reach the dinosaur-infested island, but the characters in this sequel accomplish the same feat within the first chapter--meaning a stronger focus on fighting prehistoric creatures and making out with voluptuous cavewomen. Despite the scientific pretensions of the first-person narrator, little about the story comes across as logical or even vaguely plausible. The narrator is the kind of action hero who can fly an airplane, shoot like Annie Oakley, and learn a new language within a few days. He also has a perfect sense of direction and is very handy with a lasso. It drove me particularly crazy how characters always showed up in the nick of time whenever someone desperately needed rescue. Very lazy, from a storytelling perspective. Then there's all the evolutionary science mumbo-jumbo that comes across not only as being stupid, but borderline racist. The "savages" in the story are even able to pass through several evolutionary stages within a single lifetime. As they reach each new stage, a strange inner voice tells them to move away from their homes and go live among superior beings of their own kind. In other words, racial segregation at its finest. OUT OF TIME'S ABYSS: The third and weakest entry in the CASPAK trilogy, OUT OF TIME'S ABYSS is too silly and implausible for readers to stay interested in all the world-building throughout. Burroughs should have just stuck with dinosaurs; instead, our hero is pitted against a race of bat/human hybrids with a convoluted evolutionary history that requires them to kidnap unwilling females in order to reproduce, and to become serial murderers in order to climb the social ladder. Our hero spends much of the book punching these creatures in the face. And of course he rescues one of the kidnapped women, who immediately falls in love with him. And would it surprise you to learn that she is very buxom and loosely attired? The thrills of this book are all very lazy, and Burroughs relies heavily on coincidence in allowing our hero to survive his various scrapes. That, and the stupidity of his adversaries. The title OUT OF TIME'S ABYSS conveys a certain amount of gravitas, but, believe me, the book itself is a steaming bowl of corn cheese.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Julie Davis

    I'm listening to The Fantastic Worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs podcast readings by David Stifel. Truly marvelous narration, I must say. The book is somewhat less marvelous, being rather simple with a protagonist who can't read people worth a darn. However, I am sure that in its day this book was very exciting and I myself was somewhat intrigued by the "evolutionary" setup of human development that seemed to be played out in front of us once our heroes were stranded on the island of dinos. Unfortun I'm listening to The Fantastic Worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs podcast readings by David Stifel. Truly marvelous narration, I must say. The book is somewhat less marvelous, being rather simple with a protagonist who can't read people worth a darn. However, I am sure that in its day this book was very exciting and I myself was somewhat intrigued by the "evolutionary" setup of human development that seemed to be played out in front of us once our heroes were stranded on the island of dinos. Unfortunately, the need for a series trumped finishing the story of humans or of our heroes and so one is left stranded as the book ends. David Stifel is going to read the sequel next but I don't care enough to stay with it. I should mention that the book suffered in comparison to Arthur Conan Doyle's "Land Before Time" which BJ Harrison read fairly recently on The Classic Tales podcast. There was no Professor Challenger or anyone else similarly quirky, interesting, and intelligent to pique my interest. It also suffered from comparison with Murray Leinster's "Creatures of the Abyss" which I discovered on LibriVox at about the same time. Try either of those two for more complete adventure tales.

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