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Perspective! for Comic Book Artists: How to Achieve a Professional Look in your Artwork

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This clever book teaches artists the unique skill of drawing perspective for spectacular landscapes, fantastic interiors, and other wildly animated backgrounds to fit comic-strip panels.


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This clever book teaches artists the unique skill of drawing perspective for spectacular landscapes, fantastic interiors, and other wildly animated backgrounds to fit comic-strip panels.

30 review for Perspective! for Comic Book Artists: How to Achieve a Professional Look in your Artwork

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kaśyap

    Very useful. Has many clear explanations.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Persephone Zahariou

    I enjoyed it. There were a few pages where the author got technical that I got lost. Might have been better if I sketched along but I wasn’t cause I’m trying to get an overview at this point. Presenting the whole book as a comic was interesting and made it fun to read as well as providing visual info at every turn. Took about a day to finish it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jean-Paul

    Borrowed this book from my friend at 6 months ago and have just gotten around to finishing it. He'll be happy to have it back although it is a little worn because my cat decided to be a book critic as well... Presented in the same graphic narrative style as Understanding Comics, Reinventing Comics Etc. by Scott McCloud this art book uses the comic book medium to give instruction and considering that the audience for a work like this is obviously comic book fans, it's a good narrative choice. I'm Borrowed this book from my friend at 6 months ago and have just gotten around to finishing it. He'll be happy to have it back although it is a little worn because my cat decided to be a book critic as well... Presented in the same graphic narrative style as Understanding Comics, Reinventing Comics Etc. by Scott McCloud this art book uses the comic book medium to give instruction and considering that the audience for a work like this is obviously comic book fans, it's a good narrative choice. I'm not much of an artist myself, so i was just reading it to see how it stocks up against other similar books I've perused in the past, such as the aforementioned Mr. McCloud's works and the several thousand volumes of graphic novels and manga I have read over the years. Therefore, I'm not really qualified to comment on the instructional nature of the book, I'm assuming if I'd been sketching along I would probably retain more of it. But I wasn't. So I didn't. The narrator of the book is the author himself, so yay for self-insertion... and he teaches his coffee cup/friend Muggs how to properly draw objects and people in perspective. Personally I found Muggs to be creepy and unlikable. He's a talented enough artist on his own, but he's lazy and a bit dumb. He's also an opportunist and I hate the shape of his skull. Probably Muggs was the most annoying part of this book for me. I would have preferred like a cartoon dog or something... or a talking pencil or pretty much anything. Maybe it's because I'm not a coffee drinker? Anyway, just my opinion. All in all it was a pretty good book. The friend I borrowed it from is an art teacher for Middle School students and he keeps a copy in his class, where I'm sure it's appreciated. Not a bad addition for the book shelf of any budding artist really. Take a look and see how you feel.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mir Imtiaz Mostafiz Naved

    This is how a text book should be: informative, descriptive, illustrative and interactive. The text should be a reference book for Computer Graphics course too: it will easily smoothen the concept of vanishing point, horizon, cinvergence, hidden surface, one/two/three point perspectives etc. The writer opens the world of persepective in his own comic-story telling way and gradually develops our understanding of it through his illustrative dialogue with Mugg, an imaginative painter itself. What a This is how a text book should be: informative, descriptive, illustrative and interactive. The text should be a reference book for Computer Graphics course too: it will easily smoothen the concept of vanishing point, horizon, cinvergence, hidden surface, one/two/three point perspectives etc. The writer opens the world of persepective in his own comic-story telling way and gradually develops our understanding of it through his illustrative dialogue with Mugg, an imaginative painter itself. What amazed me most is how intuitively he jumped from one concept to another and build them up.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rosareading

    What should be a dry topic was made endlessly hilarious by David Chelsea's story throughout. Not story like plot, but this guy could definitely have a comic strip going. As for learning perspective, I can't believe it, but it's finally clicked! I want to do some more practice of it all, but my gosh, someone managed to teach me perspective. Definitely worth drawing everything he says throughout the book, even if that drawing will slow down the reading by weeks. Makes the move to each new step and p What should be a dry topic was made endlessly hilarious by David Chelsea's story throughout. Not story like plot, but this guy could definitely have a comic strip going. As for learning perspective, I can't believe it, but it's finally clicked! I want to do some more practice of it all, but my gosh, someone managed to teach me perspective. Definitely worth drawing everything he says throughout the book, even if that drawing will slow down the reading by weeks. Makes the move to each new step and piece of information more natural. I don't give 5 stars easily, but this deserves every one. (I bought several books on perspective hoping one would help, and this one was above and beyond the right one for me.)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anelis

    I've been trying to finish this one for more than a decade but wasn't motivated enough 'till now. Great lessons in perspective, with great examples, easy to understand, exhaustingly so. Perfect for younger readers also. The characters are a bit boring, and as a comic it's stiff. The perspectives are breathtaking and the teaching is superb but it lack the wonderful flow the McCloud books have. Still it's an awesome addition to have to your library and incredibly useful. I've been trying to finish this one for more than a decade but wasn't motivated enough 'till now. Great lessons in perspective, with great examples, easy to understand, exhaustingly so. Perfect for younger readers also. The characters are a bit boring, and as a comic it's stiff. The perspectives are breathtaking and the teaching is superb but it lack the wonderful flow the McCloud books have. Still it's an awesome addition to have to your library and incredibly useful.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    I didn’t find this book a good resource for teaching perspective drawing. The comic format doesn’t seem ideal for the instructional content. Some of the wording is confusing and hard to follow. Three stars because I guess it was engaging enough that I read it anyway and used it more as a refresher on perspective drawing.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gigi Retzo

    It has a lot of interesting information on drawing perspective, but it felt like a “tedious construction” that may have been better off as “one short book” instead after all... Reading this book felt at times rather heavy, annoying, convoluted, unnecessarily lengthy... In the end, the journey felt unpleasant, even if there is undeniably a lot to learn in the process of absorbing David’s words and images (assuming your brain can wrap around ‘em without turning into a sludge of confused jello).

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    Makes learning perspective very fun and you’ll laugh out loud a few times, but honestly to really gain a mastery on establishing depth in your drawings you’re better off learning from a dry boring old master.

  10. 5 out of 5

    بيان

    Very useful book!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Donny George

    Pretty good explanation of perspective. Some of the demos were confusing and could have been explained better. And beyond 1 point perspective, the book is less practical.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne Sorel

    Great lessons on perspective to take me closer to my future profession in comics. Thank you.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aislinn Evans

    it’s fun, it’s clear, it goes into considerable technical depth and explains everything - with PICTURES. what more could u possibly want?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Aboumrad

    Based

  15. 5 out of 5

    Caitlyn

    This author uses in a nazi swastika "joke" in teaching perspective. I would recommend finding a different perspective book so you don't support white supremacy. This author uses in a nazi swastika "joke" in teaching perspective. I would recommend finding a different perspective book so you don't support white supremacy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    It really puts things into perspective :)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kk

    This book is better than a lot of books on perspective. It's a comic so it teaches things visually which was helpful. That being said there was still a whole bunch that just went over my head, especially in the later chapters. Maybe perspective is just hard. This book is better than a lot of books on perspective. It's a comic so it teaches things visually which was helpful. That being said there was still a whole bunch that just went over my head, especially in the later chapters. Maybe perspective is just hard.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rowan Oats

    Let's get one thing straight: this book is not for comic book artists. I first read this ten years ago and, judging by the rating I gave it, I loved it. Re-reading it now, on my tenth year as a professional published comic book artist, I'm not really sure why I loved it. Ignoring comic book sins such as breaking the 180 rule, the multitude of perspective errors and the barrage of bad jokes (some of which have aged extremely poorly) this book just isn't helpful. While it's thick in theoretical kn Let's get one thing straight: this book is not for comic book artists. I first read this ten years ago and, judging by the rating I gave it, I loved it. Re-reading it now, on my tenth year as a professional published comic book artist, I'm not really sure why I loved it. Ignoring comic book sins such as breaking the 180 rule, the multitude of perspective errors and the barrage of bad jokes (some of which have aged extremely poorly) this book just isn't helpful. While it's thick in theoretical knowledge, it lacks practical application and although it's presented as a comic the author never actually talks about how you're supposed to use any of the techniques he presents. Why there are no exercises at the end of every chapter is truly a mystery. Overall, I'm left thinking the author of this book is really good at technical drawings and not very good at teaching. The techniques are better suited for architects and engineers who don't have access to CAD than overworked comic artists who're just trying to make this dang house look right before deadline tonight.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chip'sBookBinge

    I only heard about this book from reading Making Comics by Scott McCloud. If it weren't for him, I'd never have given this book a look. It's a very valuable and entertaining way of looking at the complexities of Perspective. The book itself is presented exactly like like that of Scott's books: Understanding Comics, Making Comics, etc.... It's all done in comic book form. The things you learn inside this book are 1-Point, 2-Point and 3-Point Perspective as well as Circles and Human figures. David I only heard about this book from reading Making Comics by Scott McCloud. If it weren't for him, I'd never have given this book a look. It's a very valuable and entertaining way of looking at the complexities of Perspective. The book itself is presented exactly like like that of Scott's books: Understanding Comics, Making Comics, etc.... It's all done in comic book form. The things you learn inside this book are 1-Point, 2-Point and 3-Point Perspective as well as Circles and Human figures. David Chelsea gives you the nuts and bolts of all things relating to the topic at hand. But this book does have a flaw and it's a big one in my eyes. He doesn't give the reader any clear, hands-on, step by step instructions to apply the knowledge gained from its pages. Sure, some will argue that it's up to the reader to apply what you have learned and take it from there. But I personally think some step by step walk through of practical applications within the comic field would have elevated this book to a perfect score. Rating: 4 Stars out of 5

  20. 4 out of 5

    Johnny Atomic

    In this entertaining and incredibly informative book, David takes his empty headed friend Mugg on a trip through the (comically questionable) history and application of perspective. Even though his book carries the power of a high level college course, Mr. Chelsea tames the beast of perspective by actually making the entire book a paneled story, just like a graphic novel. As the story progresses he moves us from the remedial to the practical and finally leaves us standing on the pinnacle of techn In this entertaining and incredibly informative book, David takes his empty headed friend Mugg on a trip through the (comically questionable) history and application of perspective. Even though his book carries the power of a high level college course, Mr. Chelsea tames the beast of perspective by actually making the entire book a paneled story, just like a graphic novel. As the story progresses he moves us from the remedial to the practical and finally leaves us standing on the pinnacle of technical mastery, staring back, wide-eyed at all we learned while we thought we were just having fun. Along with the all the formulaic applications are a few awesome "tricks" of perspective illustration like using old photographs to create perfect 3 point perspective without vanishing points. Notes: Don’t let the name fool you. Perspective For Comic Book Artists, is not limited in scope to comic books. In fact, I believe (as do luminaries like the late Will Eisner) that it is one of the best perspective books of our generation, for any illustrative application.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Max

    One of the better books out there on how to render perspective. David Chelsea shows Mug how to draw perspective and explains it through comic book form, much in the tradition of Scott McCloud's treatises on comics. It breaks down everything in to simple language and exercises that are illustrated in its comic panels. Chelsea even goes on to point out facts about perspective that other books get wrong. Seriously, if you draw comics, this is THE book for learning perspective. In fact, even if you do One of the better books out there on how to render perspective. David Chelsea shows Mug how to draw perspective and explains it through comic book form, much in the tradition of Scott McCloud's treatises on comics. It breaks down everything in to simple language and exercises that are illustrated in its comic panels. Chelsea even goes on to point out facts about perspective that other books get wrong. Seriously, if you draw comics, this is THE book for learning perspective. In fact, even if you don't draw comics and take up other forms of art (fine art, illustration, animation, etc), this is a handy book to have because of its easy breakdown of perspective.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jer

    Drawing in perspective seemed simple enough to me. Drawing lines to the vanishing points and then constructing vertical lines from point to point... and... uuh... wait, you mean I can take a floor plan and accurately draw it out in 3D perspective? This book answered a few questions I had and then gave me more answers to questions I hadn't even thought of asking. The best part is, it's all in comic book format, inspired by Scott McCloud's books. What better way to learn a visual craft? I'll be re-r Drawing in perspective seemed simple enough to me. Drawing lines to the vanishing points and then constructing vertical lines from point to point... and... uuh... wait, you mean I can take a floor plan and accurately draw it out in 3D perspective? This book answered a few questions I had and then gave me more answers to questions I hadn't even thought of asking. The best part is, it's all in comic book format, inspired by Scott McCloud's books. What better way to learn a visual craft? I'll be re-reading this book very soon.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Seamus

    Pretty amazing book, goes well beyond most tutorials found in other books. Most impressively, although he does not actually cover curvilinear perspective in this book, he steps up a foundational knowledge for learning it by debunking common myths about parallel lines and the horizon when drawing conic sections. If that made no sense, just know that if you ever want to do really wild perspective drawings (like the Earth from an airplane or the ceiling and floor of a room in the same picture), you Pretty amazing book, goes well beyond most tutorials found in other books. Most impressively, although he does not actually cover curvilinear perspective in this book, he steps up a foundational knowledge for learning it by debunking common myths about parallel lines and the horizon when drawing conic sections. If that made no sense, just know that if you ever want to do really wild perspective drawings (like the Earth from an airplane or the ceiling and floor of a room in the same picture), you will not have to unlearn any bad practices from reading this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    This book's format makes perspective drawing so much more accessible than it might otherwise be. Chelsea uses the medium of comics to its full potential: the visual format allows for plenty of examples, so that both the concepts of binocular vision and the task of translating them into drawing are covered very well. The dialog allows for tracing all the thought processes involved. And it's fun and engaging. It also lives up to repeat readings as refresher courses, or shelfside access when you wan This book's format makes perspective drawing so much more accessible than it might otherwise be. Chelsea uses the medium of comics to its full potential: the visual format allows for plenty of examples, so that both the concepts of binocular vision and the task of translating them into drawing are covered very well. The dialog allows for tracing all the thought processes involved. And it's fun and engaging. It also lives up to repeat readings as refresher courses, or shelfside access when you want to look up a particular technique.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Annetta Brisby

    This book, after becoming dismayed with other art learning resources that I was not yet ready for, is pretty much what got me into practicing drawing 8 months ago. It was simple for me to draw examples from the book or make up my own given its instructions. Now I draw every day, always with a respect for principles of perspective, which drive the portrayal of every shape. (Note: Some of the principles taught in the book were too advanced for me, and it was totally still fine and informative even This book, after becoming dismayed with other art learning resources that I was not yet ready for, is pretty much what got me into practicing drawing 8 months ago. It was simple for me to draw examples from the book or make up my own given its instructions. Now I draw every day, always with a respect for principles of perspective, which drive the portrayal of every shape. (Note: Some of the principles taught in the book were too advanced for me, and it was totally still fine and informative even though I moved on from it without completely understanding these more advanced principles.)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Erik Niells

    Specialized, but if you are interested in learning artistic perspective, start here. The book is done in comics form, much like Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics. The visual presentation makes the lessons very accessible, though at the end your head will be pounding looking at some of the bizarre perspective grids Chelsea throws at you. Still, I've never found a more approachable book on the subject. Just don't peek to the end, lest you fear to read the beginning. Specialized, but if you are interested in learning artistic perspective, start here. The book is done in comics form, much like Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics. The visual presentation makes the lessons very accessible, though at the end your head will be pounding looking at some of the bizarre perspective grids Chelsea throws at you. Still, I've never found a more approachable book on the subject. Just don't peek to the end, lest you fear to read the beginning.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    This book seems like it's going to be invaluable to me as I work on getting my drawing chops back. It is easy to understand, and gives practical examples of the techniques and concepts presented. The only gripe I had was that the sections on multi-point perspective, and floor plans, could have been easier to understand. To be fair, they are not simple concepts. I think that some practice and re-reading will clear up my remaining confusion. This book seems like it's going to be invaluable to me as I work on getting my drawing chops back. It is easy to understand, and gives practical examples of the techniques and concepts presented. The only gripe I had was that the sections on multi-point perspective, and floor plans, could have been easier to understand. To be fair, they are not simple concepts. I think that some practice and re-reading will clear up my remaining confusion.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Erickson

    It was okay. The thing is, I already knew pretty much all of it from drawing classes. If you know nothing about perspective then it might be a good place to start. For me, I think it was a good refresher "course," but even then it was slow going. I skipped quite a few pages in the beginning just because it was so elementary. It was okay. The thing is, I already knew pretty much all of it from drawing classes. If you know nothing about perspective then it might be a good place to start. For me, I think it was a good refresher "course," but even then it was slow going. I skipped quite a few pages in the beginning just because it was so elementary.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bill Morse

    I regard this as the best book on perspective, PERIOD! While there are probably a few better ones out there they are all dry text books. Chelsea's book walks you through all of the minutia giving you a full education. While it is marketed for comics in particular it should be the reference of choice for ALL artists. I regard this as the best book on perspective, PERIOD! While there are probably a few better ones out there they are all dry text books. Chelsea's book walks you through all of the minutia giving you a full education. While it is marketed for comics in particular it should be the reference of choice for ALL artists.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cherish

    I thought that this was a great book. It was really cool to be reminded about things that I learnt at uni. The were alot of humor elements as well as hidden truths on perspective and that made me excited to turn the page. I hope I can use what I've learnt in my drawings as well as my comic work! THANK YOU DAVID CHELSEA!!! I thought that this was a great book. It was really cool to be reminded about things that I learnt at uni. The were alot of humor elements as well as hidden truths on perspective and that made me excited to turn the page. I hope I can use what I've learnt in my drawings as well as my comic work! THANK YOU DAVID CHELSEA!!!

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