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New X-Men, Volume 4: Riot at Xavier's

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In a world where humans have made mutants the victims of horrible discrimination, Professor Xavier's School For The Gifted is a sanctuary, a safe haven for oppressed mutant youth. But the unimaginable happens when a student reinvents himself as Kid Omega and decides to take over the school. It's mutant vs. mutant...will the school ever be the same? Collecting: New X-Men (20 In a world where humans have made mutants the victims of horrible discrimination, Professor Xavier's School For The Gifted is a sanctuary, a safe haven for oppressed mutant youth. But the unimaginable happens when a student reinvents himself as Kid Omega and decides to take over the school. It's mutant vs. mutant...will the school ever be the same? Collecting: New X-Men (2001) 134-138


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In a world where humans have made mutants the victims of horrible discrimination, Professor Xavier's School For The Gifted is a sanctuary, a safe haven for oppressed mutant youth. But the unimaginable happens when a student reinvents himself as Kid Omega and decides to take over the school. It's mutant vs. mutant...will the school ever be the same? Collecting: New X-Men (20 In a world where humans have made mutants the victims of horrible discrimination, Professor Xavier's School For The Gifted is a sanctuary, a safe haven for oppressed mutant youth. But the unimaginable happens when a student reinvents himself as Kid Omega and decides to take over the school. It's mutant vs. mutant...will the school ever be the same? Collecting: New X-Men (2001) 134-138

30 review for New X-Men, Volume 4: Riot at Xavier's

  1. 4 out of 5

    ⭐Anny⭐ (Book Princess)

    3.5 stars The story again was good and thought provoking, but I didn't like the students at all. I also missed Jean, but I guess we'll see more of her soon, considering the ending of this volume... 3.5 stars The story again was good and thought provoking, but I didn't like the students at all. I also missed Jean, but I guess we'll see more of her soon, considering the ending of this volume...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dimitris Papastergiou

    Fun times at Xavier's High! Fun times at Xavier's High!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    A bunch of snotty students decide to overthrow the teachers, while an almost equally snotty group of students try to learn to work together and the heroes, the actual X-men are pretty ineffectual and too mired in their own personal problems to feel much like heroes. A huge new cast has been introduced and 90% of them are teenagers, written by someone who thinks all teenagers are jerks, but speak in really clever bits of dialogue. and to hurt the story further, we finally find what Scott and Emma h A bunch of snotty students decide to overthrow the teachers, while an almost equally snotty group of students try to learn to work together and the heroes, the actual X-men are pretty ineffectual and too mired in their own personal problems to feel much like heroes. A huge new cast has been introduced and 90% of them are teenagers, written by someone who thinks all teenagers are jerks, but speak in really clever bits of dialogue. and to hurt the story further, we finally find what Scott and Emma have been up to and it's incredibly stupid and out of character. Grant had some good ideas, but is trying too hard and forcing characters to fit his story, rather than the other way around, like it should be. A really over rated run of a classic series.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Miguel

    YES! I liked it a lot! This was the first volume of the serie you didn't need to know anything about x-men history! So for me its something amazing! Its a complete and unique story. The only thing i didn't like is the cover with jean grey... (has nothing to do with the plot). Really really exciting to read vol 5!! Fav characters: Xorn and Emma Frost!!!! YES! I liked it a lot! This was the first volume of the serie you didn't need to know anything about x-men history! So for me its something amazing! Its a complete and unique story. The only thing i didn't like is the cover with jean grey... (has nothing to do with the plot). Really really exciting to read vol 5!! Fav characters: Xorn and Emma Frost!!!!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jay DeMoir

    So I was about 35 pages into this when I realized it was getting too weird too fast. So I had to hit the brakes.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Get X Serious

    It seems as if Jason Aaron modeled his Wolverine and the X-Men run after this particular collection. Which can only be a good thing. I love one, so why wouldn't I love the other? I'm pretty interested in figuring out how exactly Quentin Quire can go from leading a Magneto-esque riot, kidnapping Professor X, inadvertently killing two students, and attempting to kill others, to being the whacky, lovable bad boy in Wolverine and the X-men. (view spoiler)[Meanwhile, his co-conspirators end up in some It seems as if Jason Aaron modeled his Wolverine and the X-Men run after this particular collection. Which can only be a good thing. I love one, so why wouldn't I love the other? I'm pretty interested in figuring out how exactly Quentin Quire can go from leading a Magneto-esque riot, kidnapping Professor X, inadvertently killing two students, and attempting to kill others, to being the whacky, lovable bad boy in Wolverine and the X-men. (view spoiler)[Meanwhile, his co-conspirators end up in some sort of prison... That doesn't really make any sense, but okay. (hide spoiler)] (view spoiler)[Also of note, there were 5 Stepford Cuckoos, now there's 4, but in the most recent X-Men run there's only 3... Still waiting to who dies next and how. (hide spoiler)] Seriously though, how many students gotta die before this school gets shut down?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Riot at Xavier's (#134-138). In his second year, Morrison tried to expand the scope of the X-Men. His work with the X-Corps in the previous arc wasn't entirely successful, because they were just too scattered, but his depiction here of the new students at Xavier's is magnificent. That's in large part thanks to Quintin Quire, one of the best characters to originate in the New X-Men, who first appears here as a young rebel without a cause. But, the Specials, the Cuckoos, and Quintin's gang all get Riot at Xavier's (#134-138). In his second year, Morrison tried to expand the scope of the X-Men. His work with the X-Corps in the previous arc wasn't entirely successful, because they were just too scattered, but his depiction here of the new students at Xavier's is magnificent. That's in large part thanks to Quintin Quire, one of the best characters to originate in the New X-Men, who first appears here as a young rebel without a cause. But, the Specials, the Cuckoos, and Quintin's gang all get great attention here, any many would recur for years afterward (though the Cuckoos and Glob Herman are the only other two to make a real impact). Beyond all that, this is a great story about the conservative old fighting the rebellious young that feels like it really goes to the core of what the X-Men are about [5/5].

  8. 4 out of 5

    M

    Civil unrest is brewing amongst the Xavier Institute student body. Led by Omega-level mutant - and social hothead - Quentin Quire, a gang of students puts their displeasure into action. The aptly titled riot is actually fairly short, showcasing when the X-Men are the teachers and the kids still need discipline. New addition Xorn begins to make the rounds, and the wheels start turning towards something bigger.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This is what happens when tens grow up with genius intellects and superpowers. They get shirty. Plus also, Cyclops and Emma Frost start getting it on psychically, which considering Jean Grey's on the edge of going Phoenix is playing with fire - literally. Awesome story. And it made Xavier cry. Good. This is what happens when tens grow up with genius intellects and superpowers. They get shirty. Plus also, Cyclops and Emma Frost start getting it on psychically, which considering Jean Grey's on the edge of going Phoenix is playing with fire - literally. Awesome story. And it made Xavier cry. Good.

  10. 5 out of 5

    C.

    Quitely's back, so the art rocks, and the story is dark and compelling. Xavier's dream is often questioned, but this take on rebellious doubt is very well done, serious, yet with Morrison's trade-mark sardonic tone. Quitely's back, so the art rocks, and the story is dark and compelling. Xavier's dream is often questioned, but this take on rebellious doubt is very well done, serious, yet with Morrison's trade-mark sardonic tone.

  11. 4 out of 5

    AJ Kallas

    Now THIS is X-Men. Relationships. Action. Drama. I also love the dialectic between Quinten Quire's New X-Men and Xorn's class of "Losers". These are all children. They might be rude and entitled, but they are still just children. And the implicit impact of Xorn's kindness and protection (even if a little negligent) goes in stark contrast to Quinten being told he was adopted. It's subtle and not even a major point of this volume. But that speaks to Morrison doing a great job of writing. (I might Now THIS is X-Men. Relationships. Action. Drama. I also love the dialectic between Quinten Quire's New X-Men and Xorn's class of "Losers". These are all children. They might be rude and entitled, but they are still just children. And the implicit impact of Xorn's kindness and protection (even if a little negligent) goes in stark contrast to Quinten being told he was adopted. It's subtle and not even a major point of this volume. But that speaks to Morrison doing a great job of writing. (I might have sounded harsh in the previous volumes, but I really didn't like them, especially with how much I'm enjoying his X-Men moving forward).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Christopher (Donut)

    Damn near perfect. I think I read it too fast, but it will be a pleasure to re-read when the time comes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I don't understand all the positive reviews. I mean, at least the art is better than the previous volume, but nearly every character is unlikable. Especially Quentin and his X-brats. Teenagers throwing tantrums because the world isn't fair that only make the world worse -- my faaaaaaaaaaaavorite. There's still this weird thing going on where Beast is telling the world he's gay while he's not, which feels a bit icky. Also, Wolverine has a soul patch. Why. What do I like? Xorn. He's interesting and I don't understand all the positive reviews. I mean, at least the art is better than the previous volume, but nearly every character is unlikable. Especially Quentin and his X-brats. Teenagers throwing tantrums because the world isn't fair that only make the world worse -- my faaaaaaaaaaaavorite. There's still this weird thing going on where Beast is telling the world he's gay while he's not, which feels a bit icky. Also, Wolverine has a soul patch. Why. What do I like? Xorn. He's interesting and seems like he has a soul. I like when the X-brats get sassed back. Some of the art I really like, and the rest is fine. Overall, though, I didn't really enjoy this and don't recommend.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Quitely's back, and I can get behind revolutionary punk rock mutants on drugs. Quitely's back, and I can get behind revolutionary punk rock mutants on drugs.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Xavier

    quentin quire is annoying as fuck

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alex E

    When a small group of students in the school for gifted students begins to fan the flames of mutant revolution, can the faculty staff stop not only the physical danger that they pose, but the ideological one as well? There's something about Grant Morrison writing about angry, rebellious youth that really works well. He manages to capture some of that youthful energy and vigor, flawed though it may be, and translate it directly for the page. Because as much as Quentin Quire thinks his story is abo When a small group of students in the school for gifted students begins to fan the flames of mutant revolution, can the faculty staff stop not only the physical danger that they pose, but the ideological one as well? There's something about Grant Morrison writing about angry, rebellious youth that really works well. He manages to capture some of that youthful energy and vigor, flawed though it may be, and translate it directly for the page. Because as much as Quentin Quire thinks his story is about a revolution and a new way of thinking, the story is very much about his lost and angry take on life after learning he was adopted. Once QQ finds out he is adopted, he begins to use the new mutant drug "kick" and that begins to amplify his already high intellect... but at the cost of his sanity. He forms a gang of mutant thugs, comprised of other students, and begins to take to the streets after learning of a mutant designer being killed by humans... which ends up being not true. So the catalyst for his revolution turns out to be completely untrue, but that doesn't matter as QQ is too angry and young to stop. I also very much liked the secondary story regarding Xorn trying to connect with the "special" class. The innocence of Xorn contrasted against the sarcastic and/or disinterest of the kids in his class made for very interesting moments. This volume also has, for the most part, Quietly at the helm for the art. And man, it's good to see him back. The book features some of his best work for the series. Some memorable moments are beast chasing a runaway car, the advent of QQ's "New X-Men" gang splash page, and one of my favorites, the Cuckoo sisters literally blowing away QQ. Really amazing in terms of art in this volume. This story is one that is always praised when talking about the Morrison run. And it's always good to re-read your favorite runs, because you kind of forget how good they really are. Morrison is giving us his take on the X-Men with his version of that classic formula of drama, humor, and action that X-titles are known for. Highly recommended for X-Men fans.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    Grant Morrison's first few storyarcs as an X-Men writer helped reinvigorate a title which had grown completely stale under the hands of Scott Lobdell and Fabien Nicieza. His new characters were fascinating, his focus on secondary mutations, and the character growth of Emma Frost seemed to be going somewhere important. This collection is fine. I like the idea of Quentin Quire starting a revolution with the next generation of mutants. I still love Frank Quitely's art, as well as Keron Grant's. I re Grant Morrison's first few storyarcs as an X-Men writer helped reinvigorate a title which had grown completely stale under the hands of Scott Lobdell and Fabien Nicieza. His new characters were fascinating, his focus on secondary mutations, and the character growth of Emma Frost seemed to be going somewhere important. This collection is fine. I like the idea of Quentin Quire starting a revolution with the next generation of mutants. I still love Frank Quitely's art, as well as Keron Grant's. I read these volumes separately, as opposed to in New X-Men by Grant Morrison: Ultimate Collection, Book 2 because I liked separating the Riot At Xavier's and Assault On Weapon Plus storyline from New X-Men, Volume 3: New Worlds because they have a different focus and feel. The downside is that this storyarc really does blend right into New X-Men, Volume 5: Assault on Weapon Plus, to the point where separating them seems arbitrary. I recommend this for anyone who was enjoying the Morrison run, and people curious about Quentin Quire's journey.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shannon McGee

    Professor X. is about to open his mutant school to combined humans and mutants. He works to unite both mutant and human but the death of a mutant by a human stirs anger in the students already at Xavier’s School For Gifted. Quentin (later known as Kid Omega) creates chaos and kindles the anger of his fellow students by using his mental powers and a drug that enhances each of their powers. I have been going back to comics but only reading graphic novels that I find deals on so I am reading them ou Professor X. is about to open his mutant school to combined humans and mutants. He works to unite both mutant and human but the death of a mutant by a human stirs anger in the students already at Xavier’s School For Gifted. Quentin (later known as Kid Omega) creates chaos and kindles the anger of his fellow students by using his mental powers and a drug that enhances each of their powers. I have been going back to comics but only reading graphic novels that I find deals on so I am reading them out of order. Xmen has always been a favorite of mine. I prefer the original X-Men team but I like being introduced to new mutants. This is the second graphic novel I have read with Quentin (Kid Omega). In both, he has huge anger problems and really seems to mess things up and causing deaths. Not a big fan of him. I was interested in the Cyclops, Emma Frost, and Jean Grey triangle. I had an issue with the art though. Especially with the way Quentin is usually drawn. Sometimes he looks like a girl and sometimes his facial features just seem off or not normal. Also, the gang that Quentin gets together wears these red and green sweaters that make them look like a Freddy Krueger gang. Maybe because they are a nightmare. Still a Marvel fan I will continue to read comics. I think anyone who into superheroes or feels like an outcast will like the X-men comics.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Definitely the highlight of Morrison’s run on New X-Men for me. After a scattershot third volume which occasionally felt like a collection of one-shots instead of a unified arc, “Riot at Xavier’s” is wonderfully cohesive. I especially love how the B-story (featuring Xorn and the Special Class) comments on and eventually folds into the main action of the A-story. The focus on younger students (Beak, Angel, the Stepford Cuckoos, Basilisk, Glob Herman, etc.) is such a welcome shot in the arm; Morri Definitely the highlight of Morrison’s run on New X-Men for me. After a scattershot third volume which occasionally felt like a collection of one-shots instead of a unified arc, “Riot at Xavier’s” is wonderfully cohesive. I especially love how the B-story (featuring Xorn and the Special Class) comments on and eventually folds into the main action of the A-story. The focus on younger students (Beak, Angel, the Stepford Cuckoos, Basilisk, Glob Herman, etc.) is such a welcome shot in the arm; Morrison does a great job capturing subtle notes of self-consciousness and insecurity which accompany developing self-identity during adolescence. His characterization of Quentin Quire as a scared, precocious teen reinventing himself after a newfound disillusionment with authority feels more vital and fresh than anything else in New X-Men...the X-Men will always be fundamentally tied with otherness of adolescence to me, and the umpteenth rehash of recycled conflicts with middle-aged stalwarts like Scott, Jean, and Logan frequently feel disconnected from that. “Riot at Xavier’s” taps into all kinds of adolescent traumas in real, genuine ways, and that’s a big part of why it’ll always be a personal favorite.

  20. 4 out of 5

    C

    Probably my favorite volume of Morrison's run so far. It still feels a little unsettling, like I missed a few years of storyline, but the story was well-written and interesting. Beast's recent weirdness is dialed back a bit and somewhat explained so that was good. I still maintain that this would be a much better book if it was not the X-men. Morrison is a heck of a writer but he doesn't seem to want to stick with the existing personalities of the main characters. I think that is why I enjoyed t Probably my favorite volume of Morrison's run so far. It still feels a little unsettling, like I missed a few years of storyline, but the story was well-written and interesting. Beast's recent weirdness is dialed back a bit and somewhat explained so that was good. I still maintain that this would be a much better book if it was not the X-men. Morrison is a heck of a writer but he doesn't seem to want to stick with the existing personalities of the main characters. I think that is why I enjoyed this story more than the earlier volumes as it spent the most time with characters that didn't have as much history.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    What a story! Grant Morrison captures the tumultuous generational transition of a group already marginalized by society. It is a departure from the approach seen with the New Mutants and Generation X in which the students often complained about their elders but accepted their teachings. We see how differently a new generation sees the world, and how unpredictably they respond. Telepathic prodigy Quinten Quire has had enough. Mutant fashion icon Jumbo Carnation is murdered by humans, and the U-Me What a story! Grant Morrison captures the tumultuous generational transition of a group already marginalized by society. It is a departure from the approach seen with the New Mutants and Generation X in which the students often complained about their elders but accepted their teachings. We see how differently a new generation sees the world, and how unpredictably they respond. Telepathic prodigy Quinten Quire has had enough. Mutant fashion icon Jumbo Carnation is murdered by humans, and the U-Men continue to hunt mutants to harvest their powers for themselves. The X-Men teach a growing population of mutants how to use their powers and preach peaceful coexistence, but where are they against all the injustices? Quinten has finally had enough after learning that he is adopted. He starts acting out and soon forms his own gang. Fueled by a new addictive drug called "Kick", their crimes escalate to a full riot at Xavier's School. The world watches the chaos that leads to the death of a student. Quinten does not come across as a villain but as angry and misguided. He is done with being lied to and told what to believe. He even outfits his revolution with a counter-culture "uniform" that pays homage to A Clockwork Orange. The question isn't if the X-Men can end the riot, but how they will deal with a new generation that has a completely different perspective.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    This series started out as a modern take on The X-men, and the first few volumes were as compelling as any of Grant Morrison's works. Xorn and Fantomex's backstory, as well as Emma Frost and Jean Grey taking on Cassandra Nova were essential reads. All of that head of steam came to a grinding halt with this volume though. The uprising at Xavier's school came across as contrived. The students' squabbles may be indictative of classic X-men themes to some, but I found it difficult to power through s This series started out as a modern take on The X-men, and the first few volumes were as compelling as any of Grant Morrison's works. Xorn and Fantomex's backstory, as well as Emma Frost and Jean Grey taking on Cassandra Nova were essential reads. All of that head of steam came to a grinding halt with this volume though. The uprising at Xavier's school came across as contrived. The students' squabbles may be indictative of classic X-men themes to some, but I found it difficult to power through such a contextually menial disturbance when compared to all the previous conflicts enacted.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Judith Groen

    I liked this story okay, the riot thing was interesting and they made some good points. But I keep finding this run lackluster. People on the internet go all crazy about it, as if it's the best thing ever written. It's not bad, sure. But I am not amazed by it, like some other comics actually did. Also the art is still terrible. It was better than the previous, yes... But it still wasn't great. I will continue this series, as I am already half way through, but I don't think I will ever revisit it I liked this story okay, the riot thing was interesting and they made some good points. But I keep finding this run lackluster. People on the internet go all crazy about it, as if it's the best thing ever written. It's not bad, sure. But I am not amazed by it, like some other comics actually did. Also the art is still terrible. It was better than the previous, yes... But it still wasn't great. I will continue this series, as I am already half way through, but I don't think I will ever revisit it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    MrColdStreamNovels

    Wow, what a fast-paced issue! It's all action and shenanigans, with drug issues, rebellion and feelings of loneliness taking center stage. The opening issus is a bit of a filler one, but the rest is pure gold. And the art style is beautiful and stays consistent all the way through. I am really starting to like Xorn, while the story focuses on the wrong new students (Beak is bland). But overall, the most interesting and consistent run of the New X-Men up to this point. Wow, what a fast-paced issue! It's all action and shenanigans, with drug issues, rebellion and feelings of loneliness taking center stage. The opening issus is a bit of a filler one, but the rest is pure gold. And the art style is beautiful and stays consistent all the way through. I am really starting to like Xorn, while the story focuses on the wrong new students (Beak is bland). But overall, the most interesting and consistent run of the New X-Men up to this point.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Adam Spanos

    An Omega level telepath named Quentin Quire, spurned by the death of celebrity-like mutant, begins forming a gang inside the school as their opening day to the public approaches. Loaded with snappy dialogue, Morrison's master storytelling, and superb art by Frank Quitely (who actually managed to ALMOST do all the art for a full storyarc), this volume ends on a tragic note, along with some hard choices to make for Beak, and Jean learning of the psychic affair between Cyclops and Emma Frost. An Omega level telepath named Quentin Quire, spurned by the death of celebrity-like mutant, begins forming a gang inside the school as their opening day to the public approaches. Loaded with snappy dialogue, Morrison's master storytelling, and superb art by Frank Quitely (who actually managed to ALMOST do all the art for a full storyarc), this volume ends on a tragic note, along with some hard choices to make for Beak, and Jean learning of the psychic affair between Cyclops and Emma Frost.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Clint

    Vol4 focuses on an interesting ideological threat within the mutant student body and growing complication within the Cyclops/Jean Grey/Emma Frost dynamic; I really enjoyed the switch to internal drama over external villains, though I hope to see Fantomex again next volume. Frank Quitely doing the art on nearly all of these issues is a nice return, too.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris Browning

    I’m getting confused now with editions, as mine is the one with Xorn on the cover. And it’s the weaker volume yet but mainly because of the final story whose art by Ethan Van Sciver is ugly and way too redolent of the nineties and just muddies the narrative way too much. It’s a shame because otherwise this has been an excellent “between stories” run of shorter, more expansive issues

  28. 4 out of 5

    Henry Blackwood

    I don’t really have superlatives for how good this run is right now. Morrison’s putting his hands deep into what I’ve always seen as the most interesting topics in X-Men. The Scott/Emma/Jean love triangle is a SO SPICY too. I can’t get enough.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lillian Francis

    Still hate Quietly's art. Story is pretty horrid too. As are most of the characters. Nothing to really recommend this as a positive reading experience. And the whole Beast pretending to be gay thing. Turns my stomach. If you want genuine gay characters of this period check out Uncanny x-men. Still hate Quietly's art. Story is pretty horrid too. As are most of the characters. Nothing to really recommend this as a positive reading experience. And the whole Beast pretending to be gay thing. Turns my stomach. If you want genuine gay characters of this period check out Uncanny x-men.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    Loving the "losers" gang and the new "bad guy". Great stuff. Loving the "losers" gang and the new "bad guy". Great stuff.

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