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Power Man and Iron Fist #50-53 New Avengers: Luke Cage #1-3


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Power Man and Iron Fist #50-53 New Avengers: Luke Cage #1-3

30 review for Power Man

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    Marvel's Mightiest heroes Book 49. Two stories starring Power Man AKA Luke Cage. In the first, from the 70s, we see Luke teaming-up with Iron Fist to take on a gang of robot hoodlums controlled by the villainess Deadly Nightshade. The second story sees Luke, now an Avenger, returning to the streets to take down a heroin ring in Philadelphia. Created to tap into the market created by the popularity of 'Blaxploitation' and kung fu movies, Claremont's story here is very much of its time and therefor Marvel's Mightiest heroes Book 49. Two stories starring Power Man AKA Luke Cage. In the first, from the 70s, we see Luke teaming-up with Iron Fist to take on a gang of robot hoodlums controlled by the villainess Deadly Nightshade. The second story sees Luke, now an Avenger, returning to the streets to take down a heroin ring in Philadelphia. Created to tap into the market created by the popularity of 'Blaxploitation' and kung fu movies, Claremont's story here is very much of its time and therefore contains a few racial stereotypes, awkward jive-talk and women wandering around in their underwear for some reason. However, despite all that I actually rather enjoyed it. Perhaps its because I grew up loving things like both 'Shaft' and Bruce Lee movies, so this story hits a very particular nostalgia button for me, but I actually think there's more to it than that. This story is very much of the so-called 'street level' style and both Cage and Danny Rand make excellent protagonists for that. I'll admit that until the Netflix TV series I had little interest in these two characters, but now I see them in a more appreciative light and enjoyed seeing them in action together for the first time. (Yeah, that's right, that's me saying I didn't hate the Iron Fist Netflix series. Come at me, bro!) The second story here is very well chosen to compliment Luke's origins. In recent years he has become a leading member of the Avengers, making him an A-list Marvel hero in a way he never was before, but Arcudi cleverly takes him away from all of that and back to tackling a street level criminal ring with little or no back-up. It's not a game-changing story by any measure, but it is a well-written and satisfying return to his roots for Luke Cage. * More reviews here: https://fsfh-book-review2.webnode.com/ *

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joasia

    Na początku warto zaznaczyć, że miałam wiele podejść do tego typu postaci. Nie polubiłam charakteru Iron Firsta, ani motywacji Punishera. A teraz, po raz kolejny, z własnej woli, mierzę się z podobnym człowiekiem- Power Manem. Oceniając obiektywnie, jeżeli istnieje coś takiego jak obiektywna ocena, duet Power Mana i Iron Firsta jest naprawdę zgrany. Mają podobne charaktery i umiejętnie komunikują się podczas bitwy, co zapewnia im zwycięstwo. Power Man ma coś jednak w sobie. Nie mówię tu o niezach Na początku warto zaznaczyć, że miałam wiele podejść do tego typu postaci. Nie polubiłam charakteru Iron Firsta, ani motywacji Punishera. A teraz, po raz kolejny, z własnej woli, mierzę się z podobnym człowiekiem- Power Manem. Oceniając obiektywnie, jeżeli istnieje coś takiego jak obiektywna ocena, duet Power Mana i Iron Firsta jest naprawdę zgrany. Mają podobne charaktery i umiejętnie komunikują się podczas bitwy, co zapewnia im zwycięstwo. Power Man ma coś jednak w sobie. Nie mówię tu o niezachwianej pewności siebie, albo dążeniu do wynierzenia sprawiedliwości, ale o czymś innym, co trudno jest mi zidentyfikować. Po prostu ma coś, co przyciąga mnie jako czytelnika. Są jeszcze oczywiście ilustracje, stanowiące istną ucztę dla oczu.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Benja Calderon

    Tomo que contiene la primera etapa de la ya clásica dupla Luke Cage y Iron Fist. Pasado a 70's, con clichés sobre clichés de personajes negros y karatekas, pero resulta, resulta bien, por algo el éxito extendido casi por más de una década de la dupla Tambien la miniserie donde Luke se luce como detective para, como dice la introducción al tomo, dedicarse al trabajo más díficil: salvar el barrio Siendo el segundo tomo de un b-list en esta colección, es bastante bueno Tomo que contiene la primera etapa de la ya clásica dupla Luke Cage y Iron Fist. Pasado a 70's, con clichés sobre clichés de personajes negros y karatekas, pero resulta, resulta bien, por algo el éxito extendido casi por más de una década de la dupla Tambien la miniserie donde Luke se luce como detective para, como dice la introducción al tomo, dedicarse al trabajo más díficil: salvar el barrio Siendo el segundo tomo de un b-list en esta colección, es bastante bueno

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah-Jayne Briggs

    (This review may contain spoilers). Ideally, I'd give this book 3.5 stars. I did think Luke Cage sounded like an interesting character from what I read of him previously... but I was a bit disappointed not to see a whole lot of depth to what he was doing even in the second set of comics. I did think it was good to get something of a feel for Luke's past and although I did feel a lot of sympathy for him, I was confused about why he was persecuted by one of the prison guards. It was good to see Luke' (This review may contain spoilers). Ideally, I'd give this book 3.5 stars. I did think Luke Cage sounded like an interesting character from what I read of him previously... but I was a bit disappointed not to see a whole lot of depth to what he was doing even in the second set of comics. I did think it was good to get something of a feel for Luke's past and although I did feel a lot of sympathy for him, I was confused about why he was persecuted by one of the prison guards. It was good to see Luke's friendship with Iron Fist and although the first set of comics don't focus entirely on him, I did think he had some good one-liners. Plus, I thought it was really good how he had to face an enemy where his brute strength actually did very little. The artwork in the first set of comics was more light-hearted than the second set, I felt, but it was a bit disappointing to see that both sets seemed to focus mainly on the fighting and less on the interactions between the characters. I did like seeing Danny with Joy, though, even though I hadn't seen any of their previous interactions. The second set of comics seemed to have a lot of potential and I did like seeing Luke with his wife and daughter. I had a lot of sympathy for Jess in not wanting to risk anything happening to her husband and for him to come home safely... at the same time, I could understand where Luke was coming from. It was nice to see a glimpse back into his past and that he wasn't as cold-hearted as the 'hero for hire' background made him appear to be. I was disappointed not to see more of Luke interacting with the other Avengers. It seemed like they weren't a team in the same way they had been in the other Avengers issues I read. I thought the artwork for the second set of comics fit quite well with the storyline, being quite a gritty arc. I thought it was interesting to see how Leodis was dragged into doing the wrong thing while trying to do the right thing. That's something I would have liked to see dealt with more. I don't think I'll actively look for more comic books focusing on Luke Cage... but I'd be happy to see him in future comic books.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Graham

    Luke Cage wasn’t Marvel’s first black superhero, but he was the first street-level one. His adventures weren’t based around world-shattering cataclysmic events, but rather those closer to home. Power Man eventually leads his own team of Avengers, but he’s still a grounded character. In volume 49 of Marvel’s Mightiest Heroes, we’re treated to stories later on in Power Man’s career. He teams up with a (then unlikely) ally, Iron Fist and take on a number of enemies. These initial four issues feel a Luke Cage wasn’t Marvel’s first black superhero, but he was the first street-level one. His adventures weren’t based around world-shattering cataclysmic events, but rather those closer to home. Power Man eventually leads his own team of Avengers, but he’s still a grounded character. In volume 49 of Marvel’s Mightiest Heroes, we’re treated to stories later on in Power Man’s career. He teams up with a (then unlikely) ally, Iron Fist and take on a number of enemies. These initial four issues feel a bit uneasy as they’re akin to 1970s Blaxploitation films. This means some stereotyping and jargon. I’m somewhat surprised the words, “jive turkey,” didn’t appear in here. The later three issues in the volume break away from the previous’ origins, but it doesn’t feel as if there’s a lot of story. Yes, there’s a lot of action, and Power Man even fights the mobster, Hammer Head, but else not much substance to it. There are a range of arcs Marvel could have used for this graphic novel, but the featured ones do an okay job. As with other volumes in the series the 1970s artwork is standard fair. The latter story has an almost street art look to it, which is what I presume the artist is going for. It works with the story’s setting, but at times panels are a hit and a miss. Something is wrong if Power Man looks a little like Mr Fantastic at times. Overall, Power Man is an average book. It’s recommended for long-time fans, but not never ones.

  6. 4 out of 5

    James Rodrigues

    In anticipation for his Netflix series premiering at the end of this month, I felt it was about time to give this a read. The first four issues are taken from Cage's Heroes for Hire phase, where he and Iron Fist battle vengeful villains and robots working for a crime Lord. These tales do feel dated at times, but they're bundles of fun, with both Cage and Fist getting wonderful moments. The next three issues are taken from a New Avengers mini-series, where our character goes to Philadelphia, tackli In anticipation for his Netflix series premiering at the end of this month, I felt it was about time to give this a read. The first four issues are taken from Cage's Heroes for Hire phase, where he and Iron Fist battle vengeful villains and robots working for a crime Lord. These tales do feel dated at times, but they're bundles of fun, with both Cage and Fist getting wonderful moments. The next three issues are taken from a New Avengers mini-series, where our character goes to Philadelphia, tackling street crime and drug trafficking. The issues are fantastic work, unfortunately marred by abysmal art work. For a look at the character prior to his MCU debut, this is a pretty good place to start. It even has a decent summarisation about the character history.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Variaciones Enrojo

    Tomo 9 de Los Héroes más poderosos de Marvel, dedicado a Luke Cage. Incluye la miniserie de Luke Cage: New Avengers y capítulos de Power Man & Iron Fist.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dony Grayman

    Tomo 8 de la colección roja, dedicado a Luke Cage, cubriendo su origen y una de sus series modernas.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jose Espinosa

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jason Curtin

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christophe

  12. 4 out of 5

    July

  13. 5 out of 5

    Trish

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carol Ballan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jacek Litka

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tomasz Skraburski

  17. 4 out of 5

    Šárka Joštová

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lee Gannon

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alan Lamounier

  20. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  21. 5 out of 5

    Csaba Rusznyák

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marcelo Cecilio

  23. 4 out of 5

    Index Purga

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hazel Cussons

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pete

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dirceu Gabriel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vendula Kreplová

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tomáš Kocián

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