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The Children on Troublemaker Street

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Look out -- here comes trouble! Jonas, Maria, and Lotta Nyman don't mean to make trouble, but because their idea of fun is to stick salami on the windows, keep the water running from the kitchen faucet until the sink overflows, and lower meatballs down through the chimney, trouble just seems to follow them.... With the Nyman kids around, anything can happen! Look out -- here comes trouble! Jonas, Maria, and Lotta Nyman don't mean to make trouble, but because their idea of fun is to stick salami on the windows, keep the water running from the kitchen faucet until the sink overflows, and lower meatballs down through the chimney, trouble just seems to follow them.... With the Nyman kids around, anything can happen!


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Look out -- here comes trouble! Jonas, Maria, and Lotta Nyman don't mean to make trouble, but because their idea of fun is to stick salami on the windows, keep the water running from the kitchen faucet until the sink overflows, and lower meatballs down through the chimney, trouble just seems to follow them.... With the Nyman kids around, anything can happen! Look out -- here comes trouble! Jonas, Maria, and Lotta Nyman don't mean to make trouble, but because their idea of fun is to stick salami on the windows, keep the water running from the kitchen faucet until the sink overflows, and lower meatballs down through the chimney, trouble just seems to follow them.... With the Nyman kids around, anything can happen!

30 review for The Children on Troublemaker Street

  1. 4 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Truth be told, I actually never did manage to read the prequel to Astrid Lindgren's Lotta på Bråkmakargatan as a child (which I of course read in German translation, and indeed Lotta zieht um was one of my favourite books from around the time I was seven years old and had just learned to read) as somehow my mother was not aware that there indeed was a prequel, that there was a book titled Die Kinder aus der Krachmacherstraße (the German translation, the German language version of Barnen på Bråkm Truth be told, I actually never did manage to read the prequel to Astrid Lindgren's Lotta på Bråkmakargatan as a child (which I of course read in German translation, and indeed Lotta zieht um was one of my favourite books from around the time I was seven years old and had just learned to read) as somehow my mother was not aware that there indeed was a prequel, that there was a book titled Die Kinder aus der Krachmacherstraße (the German translation, the German language version of Barnen på Bråkmakargatan, which takes place about a year before the events portrayed during Lotta's very bad and terrible, temper tantrum day as related in Lotta zieht um, and Die Kinder aus der Krachmacherstraße features a series of episodic anecdotes of Swedish family life, of the Nyman family's and especially of course their three young children's games, fun and at times mischief, narrated by the middle child, the at that time six year old Mia-Maria). But sadly (and after finally now heaving read Die Kinder aus der Krachmacherstraße as I realized that this story is actually contained in a compilation of Astrid Lindgren shorter novels and stories I happen to own), although Astrid Lindgren is still a perennial and total personal favourite with and for me, Die Kinder aus der Krachmacherstraße, whilst definitely amusing and entertaining to a point, has also not been nearly as textually and as narrationally delightful and as personally approachable, as readable as Lotta zieht um and yes as many of the Astrid Lindgren novels and stories I have read. For one, in Die Kinder aus der Krachmacherstraße, Mia-Maria's first person narration and voice tends to often come across and read as rather choppy and distancing (and so much so that I am feeling more like an outsider looking in than like an insider actually experiencing the Nyman children's fun and games, their trip to visit their grandparents, their Christmas joys and so on and so on). And for two, there are also simply far far too many often unconnected episodes and anecdotes stuffed into a relatively short novel, with the result that there really is not all that much of a connecting thread holding the episodes of Die Kinder aus der Krachmacherstraße together, leaving at least me with more than a bit of a feeling of disconnection (of constantly being thrown out of the narrative, out of Mia-Maria's descriptions and explanations because she moves from one episode to another at breakneck speed, with the reader never really getting a chance to fully immerse himself or herself into the story, into Jonas', Mia-Maria's and Lotta's lives). However, even with my criticisms (and my two star ranking), Die Kinder aus der Krachmacherstraße, and by extension of course also the Swedish original (as well as other translations) are still to be recommended (and yes, I do very much love and appreciate how Astrid Lindgren so glowingly and with obvious pleasure portrays and describes Swedish family life and in particular how hands-off Swedish child-rearing ideas and concepts often if not even usually seem to be, although I do as a caveat leave a bit of a warning that personally, I have indeed found both Mia-Maria's and Jonas' rather constant put-downs of Lotta and their pontifications of how their younger sister is supposedly so stupid and immature rather tedious and even a bit overly nasty at times, and in fact to the point that by the end of Die Kinder aus der Krachmacherstraße, I absolutely was feeling more than a bit uncomfortable and certainly not really in any manner all that well-disposed towards either of Lotta's older siblings and could therefore also appreciate Lotta labelling her bother and sister as nasty and mean).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    I enjoyed this book, first published in 1958, even more than I did Lotta on Troublemaker Street, published in 1961. In The Children of Troublemaker Street, Lotta, at four years of age is a year younger than the follow-up book. I imagine Astrid Lindgren, like characters from sitcoms that end up with their own show, decided to write a book focusing on Lotta because in this first book, Lotta is a great source of entertainment for the whole Nyman family, and “steals the show” so to speak. I can’t be I enjoyed this book, first published in 1958, even more than I did Lotta on Troublemaker Street, published in 1961. In The Children of Troublemaker Street, Lotta, at four years of age is a year younger than the follow-up book. I imagine Astrid Lindgren, like characters from sitcoms that end up with their own show, decided to write a book focusing on Lotta because in this first book, Lotta is a great source of entertainment for the whole Nyman family, and “steals the show” so to speak. I can’t believe how often I laughed out loud reading this 92-page “Ready-for-Chapter” book when its targeted audience is 7-10 year-old children. But it’s funny; it turned out to be just the thing I needed for “light” reading! Our narrator is almost-six-year-old middle-child Maria. Older brother Jonah is called “Big Noise” by Dad, Maria is “Little Noise”, and Lotta is “Little Nut”, The thing I like most was how Lotta’s older siblings, Maria and Jonas played together, creating fun things to do – things that often got them into trouble. Of course, this is author Astrid Lindgren’s trademark: create children like Lotta and Pippi Longstocking http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/... children who do things they aren’t “supposed” to do. Not really a novel, this is more a collection of ten separate days in the life of the Nyman family. In “Lotta is Stubborn” Maria is sent to the store for medicine the day following Lotta’s refusal to take anything for the cough and cold that worsened overnight. Maria is waiting for the clerk when Lotta walks in, her nose running worse than ever. Maria tells her to go home but Lotta refuses. When a lady nearby asks, “Don’t you have a handkerchief?” Lotta replies, “Yes, but I don’t lend it to strangers.” In “We Visit Our Grandparents” Mother and the children take the train, because Mother doesn’t drive. On the train, Lotta whispers loudly to her mother: “That old man has a wart on his chin.” Mother tells Lotta to be quiet; the man can hear her. A look of surprise crossing her face, Lotta asks, “Doesn’t he know that he has a wart on his chin?” Later, when no one can find Lotta, she’s finally discovered busily explaining to the occupants of a compartment further down, “In our compartment there is a man who has a wart on his chin but he doesn’t know about it.” And in “Lotta Almost Curses” – I won’t give it away, but – one little scene is particularly illustrative of Lotta’s precociousness: Up in a tree house, unable to finish eating all the pancakes their grandmother made them, Lotta hangs them on the tree, pretending they’re leaves. Eventually those pancakes get eaten, so Lotta proclaims that they have to begin eating the green ones. She puts jam and sugar on a leaf and eats it. When Jonas tells her she’d better make sure there isn’t a worm on the leaf, Lotta says, “The worm has to watch out for himself.” Granted, Lotta is quite astute for her age, and these are tame anecdotes by today’s standards. But Robin Preiss Glasser’s illustrations are delightfully expressive, and it’s a story that a young reader could read independently and “get the humour”. Teaching Grade 2 for a few years, I was often amazed at what children at that age found hilarious; it’s an age where they can appreciate puns or the silliest of jokes. And of course this book would be great fun for an adult to read aloud to a child, too.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Manny

    One of the things I like most about Sweden is that Swedes are so nice to their children. Swedish kids really do, as a rule, look exceptionally happy, and I'm sure they grow up to be better and more secure people as a result. Of course, society wants to even things out; so, in school, they're all taught that it's wrong to be the least bit better than anyone else, which drives the high achievers mad. But that's another story. This book has some delightful examples of good parenting practices. Lotta One of the things I like most about Sweden is that Swedes are so nice to their children. Swedish kids really do, as a rule, look exceptionally happy, and I'm sure they grow up to be better and more secure people as a result. Of course, society wants to even things out; so, in school, they're all taught that it's wrong to be the least bit better than anyone else, which drives the high achievers mad. But that's another story. This book has some delightful examples of good parenting practices. Lotta, 5 years old, is a difficult girl. She has a ferocious temper, and in general finds it hard to control her emotions. In my favorite episode, she's just been given a new sweater. Like many children, she's suspicious of new clothes; and sure enough, when she tries on the sweater, it doesn't feel right at all. "Det killar och sticks!" she says in Swedish, which I might translate as "It's ickly and prickly!" She just hates it. Mom tells her to wear it, it'll be fine after a while. But Lotta is already in one of her rages. So as soon as Mom leaves the room, she takes a pair of scissors, and does some impromptu retailoring of the offending sweater, to try and make it more comfortable. In five minutes, she's completely ruined it. Then she's aghast at what she's done. Mom will kill her. Her life is over. She's going to have to leave home. So she takes a few of her favorite possessions, and a little food, and tells Mom that she's going to go live in the shed at the bottom of the garden. This is where the good parenting comes in. Mom is cool about it; she tells Lotta very seriously that she understands that she's gotta do what she's gotta do, but she really hopes she'll come back and visit for Christmas, 'cause family is important. Lotta leaves to embark on her new life, but it's hard to set up your own home when you're only five, and Christmas is further away than she'd realized. It was nice to hear that Mom wanted her back then, but maybe they could bring the date forward a bit? And by the end of the day they've worked out an acceptable compromise, so that no one needs to feel humiliated. If you've got a difficult child, they might like these stories. Or possibly you will!

  4. 5 out of 5

    evelina

    Never one of my favorite Astrid Lindgren books.

  5. 4 out of 5

    D'Anne

    Do you love it when you're reading a book to your son and all of a sudden a child in the book is in black face and pretending to be a scary escaped African slave? Then you'll want to pay special attention to chapter 9 of this book, "Lotta In Jail." Do you love it when children swear? Truth be told, I do, it is hilarious, but I don't really want my son to swear and thus do not want the characters in his books to swear, either. In chapter 7, "Lotta Almost Curses," Lotta says "damn" repeatedly, whi Do you love it when you're reading a book to your son and all of a sudden a child in the book is in black face and pretending to be a scary escaped African slave? Then you'll want to pay special attention to chapter 9 of this book, "Lotta In Jail." Do you love it when children swear? Truth be told, I do, it is hilarious, but I don't really want my son to swear and thus do not want the characters in his books to swear, either. In chapter 7, "Lotta Almost Curses," Lotta says "damn" repeatedly, which the book describes as "almost a swearword." Lotta says, for example, "Fish on Sunday! Damn it!" (Lotta does not like fish). I changed it to "darn" while I was reading it aloud to my son. Aside from a funny scene in which the children are playing pirates which made my son and I laugh very hard, this book was mostly a let-down after reading Lotta on Troublemaker Street, which we liked very much.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    I read this almost immediately after reading Lotta on Troublemaker Street and I was a bit disappointed with this one. It’s not a sequel, as I’d thought, but a companion book. It seems to take place about a year before the Lotta book. (In the Lotta book she is 5; in this book she is 4 years old.) The Lotta book was told by the author but much was from Lotta’s viewpoint. This book is told by Lotta’s older sister, who’s almost 6 and the middle child in the family. This is a series of days in the li I read this almost immediately after reading Lotta on Troublemaker Street and I was a bit disappointed with this one. It’s not a sequel, as I’d thought, but a companion book. It seems to take place about a year before the Lotta book. (In the Lotta book she is 5; in this book she is 4 years old.) The Lotta book was told by the author but much was from Lotta’s viewpoint. This book is told by Lotta’s older sister, who’s almost 6 and the middle child in the family. This is a series of days in the life of this family, particularly the children in the family. I suspect I would have loved it when I was 5 to 7 years old, and that I would have enjoyed it more if I hadn’t just finished the Lotta book. This one did not seem as charming to me, or quite as good natured/good hearted. It was sure jam packed full of events. It has only 92 pages but 10 chapters. It reminded me slightly of one of my favorite all time books Meet the Austins by Madeleine L’Engle, but designed for a slightly younger audience, and I didn’t like it nearly as much. It’s still a worthwhile read, especially for girls 5-7 years old. Young readers should be able to read the Troublemaker Street books on their own, although they would be fun as read aloud books. The illustrations are lovely and fit the story well.

  7. 4 out of 5

    SwedishGeekGirl

    This one was also alot of fun but I did not love it as mutch as some other works I read this week by Astrid Lindgren. For me I feel the movies about Lotta are m0re fun and even more charming. The children on Troublemaker street by Astrid Lindgren get 7.7/10 stars.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jelka

    2.75* This is definitely not one of my favourites by Astrid Lindgren, it's just alright. Exept for the chapter in which Lotta pretends to be a slave and is in blackface (including the N-slur in the unrevised version)! That whole chapter inappropriate and totally uncalled for. 2.75* This is definitely not one of my favourites by Astrid Lindgren, it's just alright. Exept for the chapter in which Lotta pretends to be a slave and is in blackface (including the N-slur in the unrevised version)! That whole chapter inappropriate and totally uncalled for.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kerstin Macdonald

    I really enjoyed reading this book and found it quite relatable with being an older sibling myself. It was very easy to read which is good and bad in its own ways, as you could easily skip through the pages enjoying the story, but it didn't make you think too much about the story or the characters. I really enjoyed reading this book and found it quite relatable with being an older sibling myself. It was very easy to read which is good and bad in its own ways, as you could easily skip through the pages enjoying the story, but it didn't make you think too much about the story or the characters.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    I really enjoyed it! I actually did not know this book existed and when I found it in a charity shop I was so excited! The only thing I did not like was how Lotta's brother turns to her by saying "you idiot". I really enjoyed it! I actually did not know this book existed and when I found it in a charity shop I was so excited! The only thing I did not like was how Lotta's brother turns to her by saying "you idiot".

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hildegunn

    Sugar sweet and completely innocent. Cute and naughty and quick witted characters.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sakos me Biftekia

    This was a hard pass for me, I generally prefer my kids' lit without awful racist surprises inside. This was an edition from 1992 in Swedish, we've got to do better. This was a hard pass for me, I generally prefer my kids' lit without awful racist surprises inside. This was an edition from 1992 in Swedish, we've got to do better.

  13. 4 out of 5

    BetweenLinesAndLife

    3.5 Stars I read this for class in preparation to analyze Lotta and you can definitely do that well. I enjoyed it, there were some sweet scenes, especially the last episode when they celebrated Christmas and I really like Lotta It's definitely more episodic than an ongoing narrative, which I find interesting for kids to read maybe even on their own. It bothered me a little bit how the parents and siblings talked about Lotta (since it's from the perspective of the oldest sibling) and there was one sl 3.5 Stars I read this for class in preparation to analyze Lotta and you can definitely do that well. I enjoyed it, there were some sweet scenes, especially the last episode when they celebrated Christmas and I really like Lotta It's definitely more episodic than an ongoing narrative, which I find interesting for kids to read maybe even on their own. It bothered me a little bit how the parents and siblings talked about Lotta (since it's from the perspective of the oldest sibling) and there was one slightly questionable scene that definitely feels out of date nowadays. But otherwise, children's fiction is always cute overall!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anne Oftedahl

    My mum and I are doing a thing of reading lots of Astrid Lindgren books because we didn't really do that when I was a kid (although she apparently read them for my older brother, which, rude, and so we've been getting them from the library. I mostly wanted to read the longer ones, like Ronja and Pippi and Mio, but mum picked up this one, too. Look, this is very much a children's book. There's not much plot going on. But man, it is funny. Seriously, these kids get up to so many shenanigans and it i My mum and I are doing a thing of reading lots of Astrid Lindgren books because we didn't really do that when I was a kid (although she apparently read them for my older brother, which, rude, and so we've been getting them from the library. I mostly wanted to read the longer ones, like Ronja and Pippi and Mio, but mum picked up this one, too. Look, this is very much a children's book. There's not much plot going on. But man, it is funny. Seriously, these kids get up to so many shenanigans and it is a joy to read. Still only 3/5 stars though, because as I said, there is very little plot. I imagine this would be really good to read to younger kids, maybe 3-6 or something?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Teodora

    Definitely 5 stars. So this book is by the author of the famous ‘Pipi longstocking’, a story of an adventurous, young tomboy-like girl who gets up to mischief. And yes, before anyone goes on saying that Astrid Lingren’s books are for little children, I know. It’s just I have a collection of her books to read and I will say that reading a few of them was definitely worth it! These books have a nice comical and childish feel to them and they really make you understand how children think. It quite Definitely 5 stars. So this book is by the author of the famous ‘Pipi longstocking’, a story of an adventurous, young tomboy-like girl who gets up to mischief. And yes, before anyone goes on saying that Astrid Lingren’s books are for little children, I know. It’s just I have a collection of her books to read and I will say that reading a few of them was definitely worth it! These books have a nice comical and childish feel to them and they really make you understand how children think. It quite nice that the book is written from the perspective of Lotta’s sister rather than third person. It’s a good book to read in one sitting 😁👍

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This was a horrible book. I thought I would love it, but I struggled to finish it and couldn't wait until I was done. There are some black and white illustrations throughout the book and they were quite nice. Story wise, I felt like it was all over the place. I felt like there was no real plot and I found Lotta to be SUPER annoying. Maybe the book lost it's awesomeness through translation because I love Pippi and her friends, but I could not get into this book and will not continue with this ser This was a horrible book. I thought I would love it, but I struggled to finish it and couldn't wait until I was done. There are some black and white illustrations throughout the book and they were quite nice. Story wise, I felt like it was all over the place. I felt like there was no real plot and I found Lotta to be SUPER annoying. Maybe the book lost it's awesomeness through translation because I love Pippi and her friends, but I could not get into this book and will not continue with this series. How this book became a series I have no idea. I am not a fan.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Racheblue Love

    Another great mini series of stories by the enchanting Astrid Lindgren. Lotta is a wonderful 4 year old child full of clever comebacks and witty ideas. A great character who learns life lessons the hard way - the way they ought to be learned in my opinion, with experience and fortitude despite any (many) adverse circumstances! My 7 year old and I raced through this after finishing the Pippi series, and we loved every precious moment of this and the shorter follow up - Lotta Makes A Mess.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pip

    Adorable book. Read this in German. Reminded me of the Alfie and Annie Rose stories.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    This was a quick and easy book to read. This would be ideal for children who have started to read by themselves.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Erin Parris-Dallia

    This book is adorable. My preschooler loved listening to it. Nothing deep, but very sweet and fun.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lilli

    Lotta my poor little meow meow. You are my hero

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Buxton

    C. children's fiction, grade 3, Sweden, family life, Mom's stash, discard C. children's fiction, grade 3, Sweden, family life, Mom's stash, discard

  23. 5 out of 5

    Fred

    Easy to read, deeply disturbing. i chose not to read it verbatum to my 7yo. we don't use profanity around children, and she beat that dead horse for three or four chapters. also, i was very put off by the small child screaming and crying because he was terrified of black african slaves. that's seriously offensive by modern standards, perhaps in 1958 Sweden there were no black people and that joke came off better? maybe i'm guilty of censorship, but this struck me as worse than the cannibals in P Easy to read, deeply disturbing. i chose not to read it verbatum to my 7yo. we don't use profanity around children, and she beat that dead horse for three or four chapters. also, i was very put off by the small child screaming and crying because he was terrified of black african slaves. that's seriously offensive by modern standards, perhaps in 1958 Sweden there were no black people and that joke came off better? maybe i'm guilty of censorship, but this struck me as worse than the cannibals in Pippi and i edited heavily as i read aloud. i'm not planning to read the rest of this series, although i recognize that this particular humor-in-bad-taste may be isolated to this single book. nobody else commented on it, so maybe i'm over-reacting.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    We LOVED the beginning of this book and laughed out loud several times...but then we got to the chapter where the little sister swears (she says d***) and I had trouble editing things out as we read. (Maren follows along now and can read the words herself, so my editing skills no longer work!) I think M probably could've handled it okay...but honestly, she doesn't know that word and I didn't want to teach it to her through reading it in a book! We LOVED the beginning of this book and laughed out loud several times...but then we got to the chapter where the little sister swears (she says d***) and I had trouble editing things out as we read. (Maren follows along now and can read the words herself, so my editing skills no longer work!) I think M probably could've handled it okay...but honestly, she doesn't know that word and I didn't want to teach it to her through reading it in a book!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Penni Russon

    Lovely. Odd, interesting structure, little vignettes, often building up to a cute one-liner, but works beautifully overall. Quiet and domestic, populated by lively kids who are complex and naughty and quarrelsome and loved and loving. The dynamics of the sibling relationship rang really true and I enjoyed the dialogue. Had the whole family listening in the end.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

    Lots of deadpan humour and quirky situations in this loving, lovely set of stories about 3 siblings. All the usual off-the-wall antics (eg using pancakes as leaves on a tree, standing in cow muck and the rain in order to grow taller) you'd expect from Lindren. Not entirely convinced by anglicization of all the names, but that's very much my preference. Lots of deadpan humour and quirky situations in this loving, lovely set of stories about 3 siblings. All the usual off-the-wall antics (eg using pancakes as leaves on a tree, standing in cow muck and the rain in order to grow taller) you'd expect from Lindren. Not entirely convinced by anglicization of all the names, but that's very much my preference.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    My kids loved this book, especially Lotta's antics. They were falling about with laughter at times. Anyone who knows a very young child will appreciate her quirks and those who have had to put up with a little brother or sister messing up their games will find it all rings very true. My kids loved this book, especially Lotta's antics. They were falling about with laughter at times. Anyone who knows a very young child will appreciate her quirks and those who have had to put up with a little brother or sister messing up their games will find it all rings very true.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This book is SO funny! The antics of Jonas, Maria, and especially Lotta are impossible to stop reading about!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dev

    We loved reading about Lotta's antics -she is quite the scene stealer! We loved reading about Lotta's antics -she is quite the scene stealer!

  30. 5 out of 5

    WSL Library

    x2

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