Hot Best Seller

Fika: The Art of The Swedish Coffee Break, with Recipes for Pastries, Breads, and Other Treats

Availability: Ready to download

An illustrated lifestyle cookbook on the Swedish tradition of fika--a twice-daily coffee break--including recipes for traditional baked goods, information and anecdotes about Swedish coffee culture, and the roots and modern incarnations of this cherished custom. Sweden is one of the world’s top coffee consuming nations, and the twice-daily social coffee break known as fika An illustrated lifestyle cookbook on the Swedish tradition of fika--a twice-daily coffee break--including recipes for traditional baked goods, information and anecdotes about Swedish coffee culture, and the roots and modern incarnations of this cherished custom. Sweden is one of the world’s top coffee consuming nations, and the twice-daily social coffee break known as fika is a cherished custom. Fika can be had alone or in groups, indoors or outdoors, while traveling or at home. A time to take a rest from work and chat with friends or colleagues over a cup and a sweet treat, fika reflects the Swedish ideal of slowing down to appreciate life’s small joys. In this adorable illustrated cookbook, Anna Brones and Johanna Kindvall share nearly fifty classic recipes from their motherland—from cinnamon buns and ginger snaps to rhubarb cordial and rye bread—allowing all of us to enjoy this charming tradition regardless of where we live.


Compare

An illustrated lifestyle cookbook on the Swedish tradition of fika--a twice-daily coffee break--including recipes for traditional baked goods, information and anecdotes about Swedish coffee culture, and the roots and modern incarnations of this cherished custom. Sweden is one of the world’s top coffee consuming nations, and the twice-daily social coffee break known as fika An illustrated lifestyle cookbook on the Swedish tradition of fika--a twice-daily coffee break--including recipes for traditional baked goods, information and anecdotes about Swedish coffee culture, and the roots and modern incarnations of this cherished custom. Sweden is one of the world’s top coffee consuming nations, and the twice-daily social coffee break known as fika is a cherished custom. Fika can be had alone or in groups, indoors or outdoors, while traveling or at home. A time to take a rest from work and chat with friends or colleagues over a cup and a sweet treat, fika reflects the Swedish ideal of slowing down to appreciate life’s small joys. In this adorable illustrated cookbook, Anna Brones and Johanna Kindvall share nearly fifty classic recipes from their motherland—from cinnamon buns and ginger snaps to rhubarb cordial and rye bread—allowing all of us to enjoy this charming tradition regardless of where we live.

30 review for Fika: The Art of The Swedish Coffee Break, with Recipes for Pastries, Breads, and Other Treats

  1. 4 out of 5

    Yodamom

    Do not read this while you are hungry. This book is filled with deviously delicious baked goods, beverages, compotes, pancakes, crackers, pies, breads, cookies, sandwiches, holiday treats and more. They will tempt you to take on this wonderful Swedish traditional coffee break as your own. Who wouldn't? In Sweden they take a break slow down, drink their coffee, eat snacks and enjoy life. Sounds wonderful right ? I am signing up for this program. Wonderfully illustrated, easy to follow recipes. Pan Do not read this while you are hungry. This book is filled with deviously delicious baked goods, beverages, compotes, pancakes, crackers, pies, breads, cookies, sandwiches, holiday treats and more. They will tempt you to take on this wonderful Swedish traditional coffee break as your own. Who wouldn't? In Sweden they take a break slow down, drink their coffee, eat snacks and enjoy life. Sounds wonderful right ? I am signing up for this program. Wonderfully illustrated, easy to follow recipes. Pantry requirements, equipment usage and steps all well drawn out with a retro feel.. There are a lot of recipes with brief stores and a few suggestions. I love this book, it is my favorite cook book so far this year . I am planning on gifting some of my coffee addicted friends with this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Autumn

    I love coffee. I love baked goods. I love baking. I am 1/4 Swedish. This cookbook was written for me! I also need to go to Sweden now.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cecelia

    Judge this book by its cover (go ahead, it’s safe!). The cover illustration tells you everything to know: Anna Brones and Johanna Kindvall’s Fika: The Art of The Swedish Coffee Break, with Recipes for Pastries, Breads, and Other Treats is a book about coffee breaks done right (in the Swedish tradition). It's 25% lifestyle and history, 75% a cookbook, and 100% interesting. Of course, I would say that – baking is my jam. My dad’s family is Danish-American, but his mother died young, so no recipes t Judge this book by its cover (go ahead, it’s safe!). The cover illustration tells you everything to know: Anna Brones and Johanna Kindvall’s Fika: The Art of The Swedish Coffee Break, with Recipes for Pastries, Breads, and Other Treats is a book about coffee breaks done right (in the Swedish tradition). It's 25% lifestyle and history, 75% a cookbook, and 100% interesting. Of course, I would say that – baking is my jam. My dad’s family is Danish-American, but his mother died young, so no recipes traveled down that side of the family tree to me. I’ve always been curious about Scandinavia and its food, though. With the last name Larsen and as the shortest (at 5’10”) of a bunch of giants, it makes sense. When a Swedish cookbook popped up on my radar, I took note. I asked my library to order a copy. I then read it cover-to-cover and baked out of it and racked up $7.50 in library fines and put it on my wishlist so that one of my freakishly tall brothers can give it to me as a gift. Fika is arranged seasonally and traditionally (by traditionally I mean there are sections of the homemade favorites, the items you’d find mostly in a bakery, and then heartier items like breads at the end). While the focus is on baked goods that go with coffee, there’s also a fair bit about the slow, handmade, homemade traditions of day-to-day life in Sweden. I enjoyed the bits about history – where and how certain dishes originated, the proper way to enjoy them, suggested flavor combinations, and so on. But the star, of course, is the food. The authors included recipes that run the gamut from easy (a spiced shortbread cookie) to complex (holiday fare), with easy-to-follow instructions. Johanna Kindvall’s art brings each recipe to life. That’s a distinctive thing about this cookbook – there aren’t any photographs. Instead, Kindvall’s illustrations of the steps and finished product are the guide. And her art is both charming and informative. To “test” the cookbook I made 4 recipes: Nutmeg slice cookies, almond potato cake, toasted rye buns and soft ginger cookies. Since the focus is on “homemade” and slow living, the instructions don’t call for any intensive appliances (though there were some tools I didn’t have, but I got by with substitutes), but I used my mixer with no ill effects. Reading the recipes all the way through is a must – some of them take a day or two to complete! The nutmeg cookies turned out well and my book club devoured them: A-. The almond potato cake was a solid B – good when it came out of the oven, but not something I’d make again unless I have gluten-intolerant guests. The rye buns (I’ve never baked with rye flour before!) were fantastic: A. And the soft ginger cookies were GREAT, A+. Note: These recipes called for less sugar than American favorites across the board. I don’t have much of a sweet tooth, but it’s something to be aware of. The stars of Swedish baking seem to be nuts, cardamom and other “Christmas-y” spices – I don’t know if I’ve ever baked out of a cookbook with fewer chocolate recipes! It was kind of liberating. I look forward to making even more of these recipes in the future. Is it clear that I like this cookbook? I hope so. If there’s one thing I can point to as a “con” I’d say that the authors didn’t need to devote quite so many words to urging readers to slow down and savor their coffee breaks. That’s preaching to the choir. In the end I didn’t mind it, though, and I don’t think many will. In all, Fika is a beautifully illustrated homage to Swedish baking, with tasty recipes and tidbits about history and culture sprinkled throughout. I can’t wait to have a copy for my own bookshelf. Recommended for: anyone who likes to experiment with baking, those interested in international food traditions, and for the perfect treats to go along with a cozy cup of coffee.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tonstant Weader

    Fika: the Art of the Swedish Coffee Break with Recipes for Pastries, Breads, and Other Treats is an irresistible cookbook for this Swedish-American with a life-long love of coffee. Even many of us attenuated Scandinavians born in America maintain that love of coffee and all the ritual of a coffee break, making this just the perfect book for me. Fika is a Swedish neologism that reverses the syllables for kaffe, the Swedish word for coffee to indicate a coffee break. The immigrants who came to Minn Fika: the Art of the Swedish Coffee Break with Recipes for Pastries, Breads, and Other Treats is an irresistible cookbook for this Swedish-American with a life-long love of coffee. Even many of us attenuated Scandinavians born in America maintain that love of coffee and all the ritual of a coffee break, making this just the perfect book for me. Fika is a Swedish neologism that reverses the syllables for kaffe, the Swedish word for coffee to indicate a coffee break. The immigrants who came to Minnesota left Sweden before the word was coined, but long after the tradition of taking a coffee break, a real coffee break, began. Having coffee is social, not like running to Starbucks and walking out with a paper cup to drink at your desk. It was sitting together, drinking coffee, eating coffeecake, rusks, or cookies. In my family, mom would make a pot of coffee, and put out a plate with snacks, some rye crisps, knäckebröd perhaps, molasses cake or oatmeal cookies, maybe a pie. Everyone had coffee together, even the kids. I do not remember when I first began to drink coffee. It was well before kindergarten, though it was probably two-thirds milk to one-third coffee. So this book reminds me of childhood, of the social communion that coffee represents. Reading Fika, I was reminded of Halldor Laxness’ Independent People, the book that probably garnered him the 1855 Nobel Prize for Literature. Coffee is ever present, mentioned more than a hundred times at least. There are several times when Laxness gets to the heart of coffee’s special place in Scandinavian culture, during a wedding, a funeral, and this amazing scene when a young boy is waking up, listening to the coffee being made. “But his grandmother’s ritual grumbling was never so protracted that it did not carry with it the promise of coffee. Never was the smoke so thick or so blue, never did it penetrate the eyes, the nose, the throat, the lungs so deeply that it could be forgotten as the precursor of that fragrance which fills the soul with optimism and faith, the fragrance of the crushed beans beneath the jet of boiling water curving from the kettle, the smell of coffee…This was morning’s hallowed moment. In such a fragrance the perversity of the world is forgotten and the soul is inspired with faith in the future; when all was said and done, it was probably true that there really were far-off places, even foreign countries.” This book brings me back to my childhood, to my family, and recalls so many rich and treasured memories that I can’t be trusted. I love it unreservedly. It also reminds me of the many cooking utensils my mom had, like her notched rolling pin, kruskavel, that was so perfect for rolling crackers and some cookies. I love it, but it is not without flaws The recipes are familiar, rich in the spices that make Swedish baking so distinct, with lots of nutmeg, ginger, and cardamom. There are many of the delicate cookies and crisps, the ones that make a hundred cookies out of the same amount of flour, butter and eggs that might make a couple dozen American cookies. However, some of the most familiar recipes of my childhood are missing. There are no recipes for krumkake, rosettes, or fattigmand. I imagine this is because three of them require special baking equipment though there is a recipe for the mandelmussor that require special tins. This is a book of recipes for things to eat with coffee, not for making coffee, but I was also surprised to see no mention of Swedish Egg Coffee. Egg coffee is so smooth and delicious that it would be great to introduce it to American coffee lovers. Nonetheless, the book is full of delicious recipes from crackers to cakes to cookies, from the more everyday to the holiday-oriented special items. It is illustrated with drawings rather than photos which makes it feel very quaint and homey, which is exactly what fika should do. ★★★★★ http://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpres...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Berry

    A short overview of the history of fika, the Scandinavian tradition of breaking up the day with coffee, and a pastry or snack of some sort. The "book" itself is brief but fun, but the gold mine is the collection of traditional and modernized Swedish recipes within to create your own coffee accompaniments. So far I've only produced the Kardemummabullar (Cardamom buns) but based on their deliciousness I suspect I'll tackle many more of the recipes in the days to come. A short overview of the history of fika, the Scandinavian tradition of breaking up the day with coffee, and a pastry or snack of some sort. The "book" itself is brief but fun, but the gold mine is the collection of traditional and modernized Swedish recipes within to create your own coffee accompaniments. So far I've only produced the Kardemummabullar (Cardamom buns) but based on their deliciousness I suspect I'll tackle many more of the recipes in the days to come.

  6. 4 out of 5

    RH Walters

    A charming book that incites and validates the fetishization of coffee, snacks and conversation. I messed up the easiest recipe in the book, but I'm devoted to the principles of fika and started a regular habit with my neighbor down the road. A charming book that incites and validates the fetishization of coffee, snacks and conversation. I messed up the easiest recipe in the book, but I'm devoted to the principles of fika and started a regular habit with my neighbor down the road.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jacqui

    This little book has it all! Beautiful illustrations, interesting reading and delicious recipes. I read it cover to cover and am looking forward to creating more fika moments in my home with some of these recipes!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Delightful. Wasn’t sure about adding cookbooks to my year challenge, since I haven’t yet read every ingredient and every instruction of every recipe...but definitely an in-depth skim with the intent to dive deeper baking session by baking session. Can’t wait to make some of these.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE!!! I need to get into a fika habit asap and take time to relax more :) I already bought two copies of this book- one for me and one as a gift!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Yum! So many delicious looking recipes and short chapters to go along with them. Can’t wait to try a few!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jenny's Book Life

    Final Review for "Fika" by Anna Brones & Johanna Kindvall (**** 4 Stars) "In the Swedish kitchen you can never be afraid of butter." (p. 67) I ADORE this little cookbook. In case you don't know, Fika is an all-purpose word for a coffee break experience which is taken very seriously in Sweden. It's time to commune with friends and family and pretty much requires a fresh and delicious home-baked treat. I grew up with a Swedish Grandma who taught me how to make many of the famous Scandinavian cookies Final Review for "Fika" by Anna Brones & Johanna Kindvall (**** 4 Stars) "In the Swedish kitchen you can never be afraid of butter." (p. 67) I ADORE this little cookbook. In case you don't know, Fika is an all-purpose word for a coffee break experience which is taken very seriously in Sweden. It's time to commune with friends and family and pretty much requires a fresh and delicious home-baked treat. I grew up with a Swedish Grandma who taught me how to make many of the famous Scandinavian cookies and coffee breads, so I had a head start. This very classy cookbook devoted to sharing both the concept and the recipes for having a charming and reviving Fika is a gem. I've tried almost a dozen of the recipes and they are great. The inspirational bits in between have encouraged me to take Fika more earnestly. Fika is along the design of English tea time -- it could certainly be done with a good tea, but is more usually coffee in Sweden -- and is a really mentally-healthy ritual IMO. Lately, a sit-down coffee break with a friend, co-worker, neighbor, or the spouse including one of the treats from this book has been a lovely way to collect myself and connect with someone I love. I absolutely plan to give every single recipe a try in the coming months. *** 5 Stars = An enduring classic to be read by all; 4 Stars = I LOVE IT! You gotta read it!; 3 Stars = A great book for a specific interest/type of reader/very casual read; 1 or 2 Stars = no comment***

  12. 5 out of 5

    Juli Anna

    This book fills quite a gap in the Scandinavian cookbook world, and I would wholeheartedly recommend it to anyone interested in Scandi baking. The recipes presented here are classics, updated just enough for them to feel timeless, and they represent a wide range of techniques and difficulty levels. There is quite a bit of text here about the history of coffee culture in Sweden, which is a welcome backdrop to the recipes. The biggest advantage that this cookbook has over other Scandi baking books This book fills quite a gap in the Scandinavian cookbook world, and I would wholeheartedly recommend it to anyone interested in Scandi baking. The recipes presented here are classics, updated just enough for them to feel timeless, and they represent a wide range of techniques and difficulty levels. There is quite a bit of text here about the history of coffee culture in Sweden, which is a welcome backdrop to the recipes. The biggest advantage that this cookbook has over other Scandi baking books I've seen is how thoroughly it's adapted to a non-European audience. Not only are the measurements translated for US bakers, but the authors do a wonderful job of explaining replacements for hard-to-find European ingredients and unusual techniques. This cookbook is probably a little too specific to warrant my adding it to my collection, but it's a really A+ volume that could be indispensable for the right person.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nick Klagge

    Fun book. Elise and I have enjoyed having a little "fika" tradition of our own lately, as people whose days are often otherwise fairly unstructured. I'm not much of a baker normally, but I set myself a challenge to make something out of this book (not that the recipes are particularly complicated). I made "muskotsnittar," or nutmeg cookies, with a fresh nutmeg nut we have had sitting around forever. ("Fresh.") They are super easy and came out well, although surprisingly not all that nutmeggy giv Fun book. Elise and I have enjoyed having a little "fika" tradition of our own lately, as people whose days are often otherwise fairly unstructured. I'm not much of a baker normally, but I set myself a challenge to make something out of this book (not that the recipes are particularly complicated). I made "muskotsnittar," or nutmeg cookies, with a fresh nutmeg nut we have had sitting around forever. ("Fresh.") They are super easy and came out well, although surprisingly not all that nutmeggy given the smell when I was grating. Kept two rolls in the freezer as Anna recommends so we can have fresh cookies again later!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    I liked this cookbook quite a bit, and plan to try a bunch of the recipes in it. There are some cookbooks that are nice aesthetically, but you know you'd never try most of the recipes. That's not the case with this one. While it might not be the prettiest cookbook I own, it was fun to read, and the recipes are accessible with common ingredients. It also made me want to live in Sweden where I could have a nice fika break every day. I had no idea the Swedes were so fond of their coffee. I liked this cookbook quite a bit, and plan to try a bunch of the recipes in it. There are some cookbooks that are nice aesthetically, but you know you'd never try most of the recipes. That's not the case with this one. While it might not be the prettiest cookbook I own, it was fun to read, and the recipes are accessible with common ingredients. It also made me want to live in Sweden where I could have a nice fika break every day. I had no idea the Swedes were so fond of their coffee.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    Fika is the art of taking a cozy break with coffee or a comfortable drink and a quality bread or sweet. It is the art of taking time to appreciate the day. I love reading about traditions of other cultures and this is such a nice explanation of this lovely Swedish daily event. It's much like an English afternoon tea. This is a cookbook of the Swedish bread and pastries, but also an easy history and explanation of the fika event. It makes me want to start this tradition in my own life. Fika is the art of taking a cozy break with coffee or a comfortable drink and a quality bread or sweet. It is the art of taking time to appreciate the day. I love reading about traditions of other cultures and this is such a nice explanation of this lovely Swedish daily event. It's much like an English afternoon tea. This is a cookbook of the Swedish bread and pastries, but also an easy history and explanation of the fika event. It makes me want to start this tradition in my own life.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Xaheen Qaiser

    This is a beautiful book that shuns stylish food photographs in favour of adorable vintage style illustrations which for me, add to it's charm. Recipes are set out clearly with the lists of ingredients and methods but with the added bonus of practical advice, some of which is very useful. What I enjoyed the most about the book is how it encourages you to enjoy baking many different cakes, breads, biscuits and cakes often, with the view of sharing them over coffee with friends and family. This is a beautiful book that shuns stylish food photographs in favour of adorable vintage style illustrations which for me, add to it's charm. Recipes are set out clearly with the lists of ingredients and methods but with the added bonus of practical advice, some of which is very useful. What I enjoyed the most about the book is how it encourages you to enjoy baking many different cakes, breads, biscuits and cakes often, with the view of sharing them over coffee with friends and family.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Beddard

    This book is both a great baking book and an insight into the Swedish tradition of fika. Author Anna Brones ties in so much history and cultural information about Fika and with the whimsical illustrations, it deserves a place on coffee tables too (no pun intended). I'm not an avid baker but Brones recipes are clear and concise and you will crave a cup of good coffee and sweet in no time! This book is both a great baking book and an insight into the Swedish tradition of fika. Author Anna Brones ties in so much history and cultural information about Fika and with the whimsical illustrations, it deserves a place on coffee tables too (no pun intended). I'm not an avid baker but Brones recipes are clear and concise and you will crave a cup of good coffee and sweet in no time!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Do you read cookbooks from cover to cover? Then you’ll love this introduction to Swedish customs and their love of baking. It even includes a recipe for flädersaft, an elderflower cordial made with flowers and lemons. The recipes are easy to follow and always start with a lovely intro. I am lucky enough to have a Swedish friend to share Fika with, which makes it all the more special.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    Fun Swedish cookbook that give you cultural bits, as well as, tasty recipes.

  20. 5 out of 5

    SA

    I wanted to eat every single sweet in this book. With a vat of coffee.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kyra Dagny-Heath

    If you are not familiar with fika or the recipes that go along with it, this is a good starting point. I found it a little lackluster after some of the books on fika that I’ve read. Enjoyable read but I won’t be adding it to my cookbook collection.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rissie

    Loved it so much that I started Fika Friday at work so I can try out all the recipes.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Gregg

    This is one of my go-to cookbooks for Swedish baked goods. Not only does it contain wonderful recipes, the authors also share the history of Fika and tidbits of Swedish culture.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Fika: The Art of The Swedish Coffee Break is an absolutely delicious cookbook! It explains that in Sweden having coffee is more than just grabbing a cup of java to go–it involves a bit of relaxation, sociability, and delightful foods. Each recipe we tried from this book came out perfectly. They were all delightful and very, very difficult to stop eating! I suspect the social aspect of fika is there to keep people from eating too many cookies themselves. The oat sandwich cookies went over wonderful Fika: The Art of The Swedish Coffee Break is an absolutely delicious cookbook! It explains that in Sweden having coffee is more than just grabbing a cup of java to go–it involves a bit of relaxation, sociability, and delightful foods. Each recipe we tried from this book came out perfectly. They were all delightful and very, very difficult to stop eating! I suspect the social aspect of fika is there to keep people from eating too many cookies themselves. The oat sandwich cookies went over wonderfully when we brought them to a gathering of friends, and that’s despite the fact that we made them in advance and froze them. They were just as good after thawing as the ones we tried fresh. Many of these recipes are short and easy, and the instructions are quite clear. One afternoon I got it in my head at the last minute to make coconut peaks; the only ingredient in it that one might not already have in the house is the unsweetened coconut. They were easy to throw together in minutes, and so delicious we didn’t end up saving any for friends (oops). The ones in the picture are a little pale; while I think I probably should have baked them for a couple of extra minutes, they were still to-die-for. Despite how good those two cookie recipes were, the blackberry almond cake is my favorite of the things we made. It’s a bit like clafoutis, just less eggy. It includes almond extract and fresh blackberries, and the combination is fantastic. Once again, the cake is disappearing way too quickly. Pretty much the only people I wouldn’t recommend this cookbook to would be those trying to watch their weight and/or sugar intake, unless they have awfully good willpower! Recipes include caramel cake(!), chocolate buttercream almond rounds, cinnamon and cardamom buns, fig squares, anise and hazelnut biscotti, ginger meringues, rhubarb cordial, sticky chocolate cake, and lots more. I’ll have to limit myself to making these right before we visit friends. It’s just extra incentive to share! NOTE: I received this book for free from Blogging for Books for this review. For a longer review including photos from our cooking, visit Errant Dreams: http://www.errantdreams.com/2015/05/r...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Conny

    I saw this book on NetGalley and it brought back so many wonderful memories for me growing up in Germany, that I jumped at the chance to review this book. Even though this is the Swedish Art of Coffee Break, I was very familiar with it, especially some of the pastries, and the only reason I did not give it 5 Stars is that it only contained illustrations and not actual color photographs. Now the illustrations are just fine and the book is filled with wonderful recipes and suggestions for your pan I saw this book on NetGalley and it brought back so many wonderful memories for me growing up in Germany, that I jumped at the chance to review this book. Even though this is the Swedish Art of Coffee Break, I was very familiar with it, especially some of the pastries, and the only reason I did not give it 5 Stars is that it only contained illustrations and not actual color photographs. Now the illustrations are just fine and the book is filled with wonderful recipes and suggestions for your pantry, and so much more, I just respond better to color pictures. I for one plan to take more actual "Fika" Break's in the future and this book reminded me of how much I actually missed that. This would make a great gift for any coffee lover.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    What a fun book about the Swedish tradition of Fika. Very similar to the Danish hygge, but more focused on the actual act of a coffee break vs a feeling of hominess. I found it interesting that the tradition used to call for at least 7 types of cookies, as well as cakes, scones, buns, etc were "required" to be served at a Fika. They didn't need to be elaborate though, which is a nice change. And they were homemade, as is the Swedish tradition. I often wonder though, when I read books as this, if What a fun book about the Swedish tradition of Fika. Very similar to the Danish hygge, but more focused on the actual act of a coffee break vs a feeling of hominess. I found it interesting that the tradition used to call for at least 7 types of cookies, as well as cakes, scones, buns, etc were "required" to be served at a Fika. They didn't need to be elaborate though, which is a nice change. And they were homemade, as is the Swedish tradition. I often wonder though, when I read books as this, if this is the way it always was, and if those traditions are still in common practice. Included are the recipes for traditional cookies that would be served. Many of them sound supremely delicious. Sprinkled along are delicate and sweet basic drawings that are quite delightful.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Despina Panagakos Yeargin

    The fika tradition reminds me of the Greek tradition of taking a break with a coffee and something sweet. In the United States we take a coffee break and that means we drink coffee (or tea or soda). In Greece, and in Sweden, we take a coffee break (or fika) and relax or join someone in conversation with a coffee and a biscuit (what the entire English-speaking world calls cookies except in the U.S.) or a small pastry or sweet bread. It's a real break to clear the mind and catch up. And, according The fika tradition reminds me of the Greek tradition of taking a break with a coffee and something sweet. In the United States we take a coffee break and that means we drink coffee (or tea or soda). In Greece, and in Sweden, we take a coffee break (or fika) and relax or join someone in conversation with a coffee and a biscuit (what the entire English-speaking world calls cookies except in the U.S.) or a small pastry or sweet bread. It's a real break to clear the mind and catch up. And, according to Anna Brones who is an avid cyclist, you can Fika just about anywhere: camping, hiking, cycling, working... Fika, a great tradition worth copying in any country and at any time.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This book is super cute, with incredible illustrations for the pages as well as the recipes (and they're helpful in creating the recipes!). Part of it is a lifestyle book, explaining the Swedish tradition of coffee and pastry. But most of the book is a cookbook, with these incredible and different pastry recipes! Most of them are for more experienced bakers, but the illustrations help with some of the explaining and they are very clearly written. Great book for anyone who likes Swedish culture. . This book is super cute, with incredible illustrations for the pages as well as the recipes (and they're helpful in creating the recipes!). Part of it is a lifestyle book, explaining the Swedish tradition of coffee and pastry. But most of the book is a cookbook, with these incredible and different pastry recipes! Most of them are for more experienced bakers, but the illustrations help with some of the explaining and they are very clearly written. Great book for anyone who likes Swedish culture. . . or pastry and coffee.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Gorgeously designed book with interesting cultural and historical tidbits and mouth-watering recipes! The recipes have been adapted for the non-Swedish baker so there is no need to hunt down expensive, exotic ingredients you might only use a few times (e.g. none of them call for hjorthornssalt, and substitutes for lingonberries are suggested). This is a delightful book and I hope it will lead to a wider appreciation of Swedish baked goods.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    I picked up this book at the American Swedish Institute. A fun read if your heritage is Swedish and you were exposed to all that wonderful coffee and delightful homemade Swedish pastries growing up, as I was. It explains the significance of fika and the varied meanings along with some great recipes to accompany your fika! Cinnamon and cardamom buns, thumbprint jam cookies, chocolate coffee squares, almond tart, raspberry pie, rhubarb cordial, apple cake and more.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...