Hot Best Seller

Some Thoughts Concerning Education

Availability: Ready to download

TO EDWARD CLARKE, of Chipley, Esq. SIR: THESE thoughts concerning education, which now come abroad into the world, do of right belong to you, being written several years since for your sake, and are no other than what you have already by you in my letters. I have so little vary'd any thing, but only the order of what was sent you at different times, and on several occasion TO EDWARD CLARKE, of Chipley, Esq. SIR: THESE thoughts concerning education, which now come abroad into the world, do of right belong to you, being written several years since for your sake, and are no other than what you have already by you in my letters. I have so little vary'd any thing, but only the order of what was sent you at different times, and on several occasions, that the reader will easily find, in the familiarity and fashion of the stile, that they were rather the private conversation of two friends, than a discourse design'd for publick view.


Compare

TO EDWARD CLARKE, of Chipley, Esq. SIR: THESE thoughts concerning education, which now come abroad into the world, do of right belong to you, being written several years since for your sake, and are no other than what you have already by you in my letters. I have so little vary'd any thing, but only the order of what was sent you at different times, and on several occasion TO EDWARD CLARKE, of Chipley, Esq. SIR: THESE thoughts concerning education, which now come abroad into the world, do of right belong to you, being written several years since for your sake, and are no other than what you have already by you in my letters. I have so little vary'd any thing, but only the order of what was sent you at different times, and on several occasions, that the reader will easily find, in the familiarity and fashion of the stile, that they were rather the private conversation of two friends, than a discourse design'd for publick view.

30 review for Some Thoughts Concerning Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    I read this as part of my "Western canon books on raising children" thing (previously read Emile and of course that is in significant part a reaction to this). Interesting stuff. Locke promotes something along the lines of authoritative parenting. He views willfully defiant behavior as deserving fairly severe discipline, but that in the absence of this, he says parents should work to influence their children via reputation and related mechanisms--praise, measured condemnation, a (dis)approving l I read this as part of my "Western canon books on raising children" thing (previously read Emile and of course that is in significant part a reaction to this). Interesting stuff. Locke promotes something along the lines of authoritative parenting. He views willfully defiant behavior as deserving fairly severe discipline, but that in the absence of this, he says parents should work to influence their children via reputation and related mechanisms--praise, measured condemnation, a (dis)approving look, etc.--while avoiding corporal punishment or nagging criticism. He has an interesting bit on how parents often get things backwards--they dote on their small children (tolerating all sorts of nonsense) and then give them a hard time as teenagers. Instead they ought to create a very high standard of discipline when their children are small, and then progressively allow them greater freedom and treat them with more respect as they grow older and more responsible. He gives great attention to "good breeding," meaning something along the lines of "general soft & social skills becoming an English gentleman," as a quality to be cultivated in the child and specifically sought out in a tutor (and harder to find in a tutor than academic skills). He figures a child with solid general skills ("good breeding," reading, math) and a bit of general exposure to specific areas (e.g. put a little bit of science in front of him) will be able to go much deeper in any areas of particular interest if he wants to, and that the child will not benefit in the long run from being forced deeper into a sub-field without particular interest. Thus children should not be put through lots of rote learning in subjects like science or Greek. He suggests that lots of traditional educational practices are misguided. For example, having kids write essays conflates the two distinct skills of writing grammatically and inventing ideas, and studying rhetorical devices would be more appropriate for a master class in public speaking than for a kid who just needs practice stringing together coherent arguments. He is skeptical of kids writing set speeches, as life is usually ex tempore. He spends a fair amount of time discussing language learning and promoting a model where children learn by exposure, reading, etc. rather than by formal grammar study (again an activity best suited to those who already have a fair degree of language mastery). He has an interesting perspective on recreation. Rather than leisure, where productive activity stops, he is in favor of alternating between activities that use different capabilities. Thus physical exercise is a break from reading, while reading is a break from physical exercise, and you can enjoy each for what it is and have a happy, balanced life without ever needing to stop and vegetate. And Locke figures whether children (or adults) view something as work or pleasure has a lot to do with framing rather than inherent qualities of the activity. Corollary: you ought to manipulate children accordingly, to the point of assigning them to play so that they'll get tired of it and be willing to take a break and study. He dismisses the teaching of poetry (worst case, kid becomes a stereotypical angsty dissolute poet; best case ???), painting (bad painting is awful and good painting is only likely to be achieved with an excessive investment of time), and music (similar). Also skeptical of much memorization, on the grounds that it is not a skill that generalizes. Some of it, inevitably, has not aged well...there is a discussion of peaches being "unwholesome" that is just amusing. I got the Grant/Tarcov version on Amazon and it seemed be good quality.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ZaRi

    "One thing I have frequently observed in children, that when they have got possession of any poor creature, they are apt to use it ill: they often torment, and treat it very roughly, young birds, butterflies, and such other poor animals which fall into their hands, and that with a seeming kind of pleasure. This I think should be watched in them, and if they incline to any such cruelty, they should be taught the contrary usage. For the custom of tormenting and killing of beasts, will, by degrees, "One thing I have frequently observed in children, that when they have got possession of any poor creature, they are apt to use it ill: they often torment, and treat it very roughly, young birds, butterflies, and such other poor animals which fall into their hands, and that with a seeming kind of pleasure. This I think should be watched in them, and if they incline to any such cruelty, they should be taught the contrary usage. For the custom of tormenting and killing of beasts, will, by degrees, harden their minds even towards men; and they will delight in the suffering and destruction of inferior creatures, will not be apt to be very compassionate or benign to those of their own kind. Our practice takes notice of this in the exclusion of butchers from juries of life and death. " "Children should not be suffer'd to lose the consideration of human nature in the shufflings of outward conditions. The more they have, the better humor'd they should be taught to be, and the more compassionate and gentle to those of their brethren who are placed lower, and have scantier portions. If they are suffer'd from their cradles to treat men ill and rudely, because, by their father's title, they think they have a little power over them, at best it is ill-bred; and if care be not taken, will by degrees nurse up their natural pride into an habitual contempt of those beneath them. And where will that probably end but in oppression and cruelty? "

  3. 5 out of 5

    Trần Hải Đăng

    #3 "Thật vậy nếu sau này chúng tốt hay xấu, người ta sẽ căn cứ trên giáo dục mà khen hay chê chúng; và khi chúng phạm lỗi, người ta sẽ không khỏi phán xét bằng câu nói thường tình: "Đó là lỗi do nền giáo dục mà chúng đã nhận được." - John Locke #3 "Thật vậy nếu sau này chúng tốt hay xấu, người ta sẽ căn cứ trên giáo dục mà khen hay chê chúng; và khi chúng phạm lỗi, người ta sẽ không khỏi phán xét bằng câu nói thường tình: "Đó là lỗi do nền giáo dục mà chúng đã nhận được." - John Locke

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I read an abridged version of this for my Educational Philosophy class. Most of the book seems like common sense on how to raise and educate children according to today's standards but I can see how it was a shift from how children were previously educated. I read an abridged version of this for my Educational Philosophy class. Most of the book seems like common sense on how to raise and educate children according to today's standards but I can see how it was a shift from how children were previously educated.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rowland Pasaribu

    Locke was very much a man of his times, partly because he did so much to shape them. He was born into an England that was teetering on the brink of enlightenment, and he helped to push the country over the edge. By the late 17th century, the beliefs in reasonable religion and secular values were overtaking a blind confidence in authority. Individual freedoms were taking central stage in political debates. Excitement over modern technologies and abilities were beginning to replace a worshipful fo Locke was very much a man of his times, partly because he did so much to shape them. He was born into an England that was teetering on the brink of enlightenment, and he helped to push the country over the edge. By the late 17th century, the beliefs in reasonable religion and secular values were overtaking a blind confidence in authority. Individual freedoms were taking central stage in political debates. Excitement over modern technologies and abilities were beginning to replace a worshipful focus on the ancient world. Locke embraced all of these trends and became their most influential spokesman. The political scene during Locke's time was unstable. In the wake of civil war, “Oliver Cromwell’ had brought temporary peace. With Cromwell gone by the mid-17th century, however, Parliament and Crown reentered an ardent struggle for power. Because Lord Ashley, Locke's employer, was first the right hand man of King Charles II and then the leader of his opposition in Parliament, Locke found himself at the center of political maneuverings and intrigue. He helped to frame the constitution for the colony of Carolina, and wrote the treatises that justified the Glorious Revolution in which William of Orange seized the throne from King James, brother of Charles. Locke's two Treatises of Government, published anonymously, argued that the only justified government was one that ruled contractually rather than by the ruler's whimsy, thus laying the foundation for a limited kingship, heavily tethered by Parliament and the will of the people. Years later, the colonists in America would use Locke's arguments as the basis for their own “revolution”, claiming that King George had failed to abide by his contract, thereby forfeiting his right to rule over them. Locke was also extremely active in religious affairs. A heated Protestant/Catholic divide helped to make the stormy political scene of late 17th England that much more turbulent. Issues of religious intolerance and forced conversion were of paramount practical importance. Locke began his career on the side of authoritarian religious impositions, but quickly changed his mind. A 1675 visit to Cleves, which exposed him to a community where members of different churches lived together peacefully, might have helped sway his opinion toward religious toleration. Locke ended up writing several well-read and enormously controversial essays in favor of religious toleration. Locke's religious writings, as well his publication of the Essay landed him in a lengthy controversy with the Bishop of Worcester. Some material generated from their published debates, found its way into later editions of the Essay. Locke's participation in modern scientific advances was largely the result of his close ties with Robert Boyle. Throughout Europe, education's focus on the ancient world was being challenged by thinkers who preferred to focus on new technology and modern ideas. Locke's Essay gave one of the decisive blows to the already ailing Scholastic movement. Locke did not set out to write a book on education. In 1684, he was approached by his friend Edward Clarke, who asked for Locke's advice on how to best raise his newborn son. Locke responded with a series of letters, which he continued to send all the way up until 1691. During the course of these letter-writing years other friends, such as William Molyneux, asked to see the letters, and soon Locke's ideas on education were circulating among a small group of parents. According to the preface ofSome Thoughts, it was the members of this group of readers that ultimately persuaded Locke to publish his letters as a book. Because it started as a series of letters, Some Thoughts does not present a systematic theory of education. As the title indicates, it merely presents some thoughts on the topic. Nonetheless it shows a great deal of insight into child psychology. When Locke speaks about "education", what he means is primarily moral education. The aim of education, in his view, is to give a man rational control over his passions and desires. As Locke sees the world, there exist certain laws of nature, stemming from God, and we must only use our reason to discover these laws. The most basic law of nature states that we must defend all of God's creatures (both ourselves and others) because we are all children of God and beloved by him. Other laws state that we have a right to property and that we have a right to punish those who violate the laws of nature. By using our reason to discover these laws, and then by following the dictates of these laws, we not only create the ideal civil society (one governed by consensual contract) but we avoid almost all human evils. The ability for human society to function in this ideal way, however, depends on the capacity people have for subverting their own passing whimsies to the dictates of reason. If people do not have this capacity, then civil society cannot maintain itself because the laws of nature will not be heeded. Some Thoughts, then, can be seen as a training manual for the moral people Locke needs to populate his civil society. Although some of Locke's concerns may seem trivial, he believes that nothing could be more important than education. As human beings, it is human beings that we are concerned with — both on the individual and societal levels — and the single most important ingredient in the formation of a human being is his education. This is a very strong claim on Locke's part because many people might believe that education is not the single most important ingredient in the formation of a human being. Others might even find this to be a frightening prospect; does this mean that children of poorer parents who are not sent to good schools have no chance of becoming good people? However, when Locke talks about education he is not talking about what school a child attends. In fact, Locke does not think children should go to school at all. He thinks that a private tutor should teach them at home. Although this solution may seem elitist, Locke believes that parents are capable of performing the role of private tutor. Locke does not believe that an academic education has much to do with forming a sound mind. When Locke talks about the importance of education he is talking about the importance of moral education; that is, about training a child to be virtuous. When viewed in this light his claim seems a little less radical, but it is still far from an obvious truth. Locke addresses the comparative importance of environment and genetics. Locke puts a great deal of weight on the nurture side: he says that nine tenths of all men are the way they are because of the way in which they were nurtured. Others, though, might put more weight on the nature side; they might argue, for instance, that men are simply born with certain personalities and no matter how you try to educate them you will make very little headway in trying to change these personalities. Locke is not completely dismissive of the nature side of the debate. While he thinks that children's minds are malleable, he admits, as we will see later, that each child is born with a certain temperament, or character. He even admits that this temperament can never be radically altered, but only encouraged in the best direction. The question, then, really does just come down to relative weights: given that children are each born with their own personalities, how much can education really be expected to form them? Locke is confident that education can go a long way, but anyone is free to object to this appraisal, especially since he never provides any arguments or hard evidence for his claims. This is something to look out for as you read Some Thoughts: is Locke justified in making his strong claims for the power of education? Does he fairly assess the nature side of the debate with his discussion of temperaments, or is his understanding of nature somewhat shallow and question begging? These are questions we will return to later.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Danijel Brestovac

    Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 52-53 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 8:11:34 AM Mislim namreč, da je dolžnost vsakega človeka, da stori vse, kar more, v prid svoje dežele; ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 97-98 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 8:15:45 AM Zdrav duh v zdravem telesu1 je kratek, a popoln opis sreče na tem svetu. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 112-113 | Added on Wednesday, Au Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 52-53 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 8:11:34 AM Mislim namreč, da je dolžnost vsakega človeka, da stori vse, kar more, v prid svoje dežele; ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 97-98 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 8:15:45 AM Zdrav duh v zdravem telesu1 je kratek, a popoln opis sreče na tem svetu. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 112-113 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 8:17:21 AM Mislim, da je duha otrok mogoče prav tako zlahka speljati v to ali ono smer kakor vodo. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 134-135 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 8:19:20 AM »Naše telo vzdrži vse, na kar ga že zgodaj navadimo.« ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 351-351 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 1:53:13 PM Ne morete si zamisliti, kakšna je moč navade. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 368-368 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 1:54:30 PM Gentlemana bi morali vselej vzgajati tako, da bi bil zmožen nositi orožje in biti vojak. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 368-370 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 1:54:41 PM Kdor pa svojega sina vzgaja, kakor da mu je namenjeno prespati vse življenje v obilju in udobju bogastva, ki mu ga namerava zapustiti, prav nič ne misli na dogajanje okrog sebe ali na čas, v katerem živi. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 390-391 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 1:55:28 PM Pri vzgoji je treba premisliti predvsem o tem, kakšne navade boste vcepili otroku, ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 569-572 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 2:00:29 PM da namreč razlike v značajih in zmožnostih ljudi izvirajo iz njihove vzgoje bolj kot iz česar koli drugega, potem smemo upravičeno sklepati, da je treba oblikovanju otrokovega duha posvetiti veliko skrb in mladega gospodiča pravočasno naučiti tistega vedenja, ki bo vplivalo na vse njegovo poznejše življenje. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 579-581 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 2:01:18 PM Opazil sem, da ljudje navadno zagrešijo tole veliko napako: ne poskrbijo dovolj, da bi se vzgoje otrok lotili pravočasno, da bi duha privadili na disciplino in poslušnost razumu tedaj, ko je najbolj nežen in ga je mogoče najbolj zlahka upogniti. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 593-594 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 2:02:39 PM pozneje, ko pijejo vodo slabega okusa, pa se čudijo, čeprav so sami zastrupili izvir. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 641-644 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:37:03 PM Oblačila imamo, ker smo sramežljivi, da nam je toplo in da zavarujemo svoja telesa, toda starši so tako neumni in bedasti, da jih priporočajo otrokom za povsem drugačne namene. Iz oblačil so naredili predmet nečimrnosti in zavisti. V otroku podpihujejo željo po novi obleki zgolj zaradi lišpa. Ko ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 746-749 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:41:28 PM Prišel bo namreč čas, ko bodo prerasli palico in kazni, in če zaradi ljubezni do vas ne bodo poslušni in ubogljivi, če jih ne bo ljubezen do kreposti in dobrega imena držala na pravi poti, kakšen vpliv boste uporabili, vas vprašam, da bi jih usmerili nanjo? ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 818-821 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:45:10 PM Taka suženjska disciplina oblikuje suženjski značaj. Otrok uboga in hlini poslušnost, dokler ga preganja strah pred palico, ko pa strah izgine in ko se izmakne vzgojiteljevemu nadzoru, si lahko dovoli ravnanje, zaradi katerega ga ne bo nihče kaznoval. Takrat dá duška svojim naravnim nagnjenjem, saj se s to metodo sploh ne spremenijo, ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 1231-1232 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:50:38 PM tole: le kdor opira srečo svojega sina na krepost in dobro vzgojo, hodi po edino varni in zanesljivi poti. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 1542-1543 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:52:32 PM resnici ni ničesar, kar bi se tako mehko in globoko vtisnilo v človekovega duha kakor zgled. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 1558-1560 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:54:07 PM Kot sem že dejal, je tepež najslabše in zato zadnje sredstvo, ki ga moramo uporabiti pri kaznovanju otrok, in še to le v skrajnih primerih, potem ko smo poskusili vse blažje načine in ko so se izkazali za neuspešne. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 1679-1681 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:55:19 PM In sprašujem vas, ali ne bi raje videli, da bi bil vaš sin podoben nekaterim od tistih, ki imajo le petsto funtov letnega dohodka, kot pa nekaterim drugim vašim znancem, ki imajo po pet tisoč funtov na leto? ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Bookmark Location 1681 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:57:24 PM ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 2003-2006 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 8:01:36 PM Predvsem pri vprašanjih morale, preudarnosti in spodobnosti mu je treba navesti primere in ga vprašati za sodbo. To spodbuja njegov razum bolj kakor vse maksime, naj so še tako jasno razložene, pravila kot opora pri vsakdanjem ravnanju pa se bolje vtisnejo v spomin. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 2003-2007 | Added on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 8:01:59 PM Predvsem pri vprašanjih morale, preudarnosti in spodobnosti mu je treba navesti primere in ga vprašati za sodbo. To spodbuja njegov razum bolj kakor vse maksime, naj so še tako jasno razložene, pravila kot opora pri vsakdanjem ravnanju pa se bolje vtisnejo v spomin. Tako njegov duh sprejme stvari same, da se trdno zasidrajo v njem in za vselej ohranijo jasno gotovost. ========== ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 2782-2784 | Added on Friday, August 15, 2014 7:13:18 PM Laganje tako pripravno in zlahka prikrije storjeno napako in je tako priljubljeno med ljudmi vseh vrst, da otrok skoraj ne more spregledati, kako se ob vsaki priložnosti zatekajo k njej. ========== Nekaj misli o vzgoji (John Locke) - Your Highlight Location 4558-4560 | Added on Friday, August 15, 2014 7:17:00 PM Vsak človek ima tako posebnega duha, kakor je poseben njegov obraz, po katerem se razlikuje od drugih ljudi. In morda niti dveh otrok ni mogoče vzgajati po natanko isti metodi.

  7. 4 out of 5

    sophia

    If you're studying educational philosophy, I'd say this is a must-read. There were many ideas Locke had that were great. Let's just give him a round of applause for the moral education thing, shall we? *claps* Thank you for believing in virtue. And yes, parents are important and should be respected, usually. And children should definitely be taught to love the truth. But, Mr. Locke, why did you want to take logic and rhetoric out of learning? They've done that a lot recently. To think, centuries If you're studying educational philosophy, I'd say this is a must-read. There were many ideas Locke had that were great. Let's just give him a round of applause for the moral education thing, shall we? *claps* Thank you for believing in virtue. And yes, parents are important and should be respected, usually. And children should definitely be taught to love the truth. But, Mr. Locke, why did you want to take logic and rhetoric out of learning? They've done that a lot recently. To think, centuries of great studies in logic and rhetoric, and then after philosophers such as Locke, the art began to fade within schools and educators. This is one of those books that is filled with great philosophies, but should also be read critically, and not be taken too literally. If you still want your kids to partake in fencing lessons, that's fine! Don't let Locke stop you. Take things out of it, such as the ideas of moral education and individualized education.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Quang Nguyen Dinh

    Một cuốn sách giáo khoa cho những người làm cha, mẹ cũng như những người có sự ảnh hưởng lớn trong việc giáo dục trẻ nhỏ. Tuy không đi sâu vào phương pháp cụ thể nhưng tác giả đã chỉ ra một đường hướng cơ bản trong việc giáo dục, mà dù hoàn cảnh có thay đổi thế nào thì những người có trách nhiệm cần nắm lấy. Cuốn sách được viết ra từ rất lâu nhưng tư tưởng lại không hề lạc hậu mà hiện nay người ta cũng đang cố gắng thực hiện để đạt được một nền giáo dục nhân văn.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Durant

    Locke, much like his Essay Concerning Human Understanding, in this text is primarily negative. In the Essay he was trying to tear down the Aristotelian order which had reigned over epistemology and metaphysics. Locke is in a similar mode here. His intention was to remove unnecessary pedantries from the curriculum, and therefore make education more practical. It's preferable to Rousseau, and most of his ideas are now accepted as common sense. Suggested reading for parents. Locke, much like his Essay Concerning Human Understanding, in this text is primarily negative. In the Essay he was trying to tear down the Aristotelian order which had reigned over epistemology and metaphysics. Locke is in a similar mode here. His intention was to remove unnecessary pedantries from the curriculum, and therefore make education more practical. It's preferable to Rousseau, and most of his ideas are now accepted as common sense. Suggested reading for parents.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joel Everett

    A highly interesting book where the English Philosopher John Locke shares his thoughts on the ideal education for a gentleman of his time. The Treatise begins the start, within educational philosophy, of a move towards concern with the utility of education; i.e. how does this apply to 'real life.' A highly interesting book where the English Philosopher John Locke shares his thoughts on the ideal education for a gentleman of his time. The Treatise begins the start, within educational philosophy, of a move towards concern with the utility of education; i.e. how does this apply to 'real life.'

  11. 4 out of 5

    Thuys

    Nhiều suy nghĩ hay lắm dù không phải mới, và thú thực mình cũng trăn trở bấy lâu, nhưng phương pháp cụ thể thì chưa rõ ràng. Những thiếu sót của hệ thống giáo dục đại trà (nguy ở chỗ không những hệ thống hổng (thậm chí sai lối) lại còn áp dụng trên diện rộng, hỏng là hỏng cả một thế hệ) nhiều khi khiến mình trông về hình thức thầy dạy tư ngày xưa mà tìm một lời chỉ dẫn. Trồng cây khó lắm.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chu Trầm

    Needless to say, I wish my parents had read this book... These thoughts of Locke are surely ahead of his time and still receive recognition these days. 9/10 and it’s easy to read (in VNam verse) (compared with other philosophy books)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Phuong Le

    Một quyển sách rất hay về cách bạn trưởng thành như một con người, và vì sao bạn nên nuôi một chú chó trước khi lập gia đình.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Linh Nguyen

    John Locke đưa cho mình những góc nhìn thật chân thực và thâm sâu về việc giáo dục một đứa trẻ. Mình sẽ đọc đi đọc lại nhiều lần để thấm nhuần tư tưởng của bác.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bich

    simple but meaningful. People always look for perfect things yet don't know they're so close and created by themselves day after day simple but meaningful. People always look for perfect things yet don't know they're so close and created by themselves day after day

  16. 4 out of 5

    Thevan Ho

    Dù có một vài điểm đã cũ, nhưng nhìn chung, các quan điểm của John Locke sau 300 năm vẫn rất đáng suy ngẫm.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Batuhan Can

    sağlık konusunda dedikleri çok saçma geldi ama kitap genel olarak güzeldi sonuçta Stuart mill gibi bir adam bu adamdan(locke) etkilenen bir babanın çocuğu

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ondřej Volf

    Even though it was written some-hundred years ago, it still holds up. Some things from the book are incredibly relevent in connection to today’s education and raising children.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Luka

    I am giving this a gift to each and every one of my friends or family members that has kids in the future

  20. 4 out of 5

    m00rdil

    Đọc lần đầu một lèo trên một chuyến xe. Giờ mình thử đọc lại lần hai, vừa đọc vừa ghi chép, xem có thay đổi gì trong suy nghĩ không.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Helvetica Standard

    Distribuiria nas maternidades se para tanto poder tivesse.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anh Thư

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. - Trước mặt trẻ con không được đề cao vật chất bằng việc khen hoặc chê món ăn, quần áo, ... - Đưa trẻ con vào tính kỉ luật để uốn nắn theo lẽ phải khi còn nhỏ - Ko truyền đat bạo lực, báo thù, độc ác - Không khoan dung nhân nhượng - Tập cho trẻ từ chối các thèm muốn và bỏ qua những đòi hỏi lúc còn nằm nôi: cho chúng biết ta cho chúng cái j đó ko phải để thoả mãn chúng mà vì điều ấy có ích cho chúng - Cho chúng thấy chính vì chúng nhõng nhẽo đòi hỏi để có bằng được thì việc có nó càng khó khăn hơn - Sự - Trước mặt trẻ con không được đề cao vật chất bằng việc khen hoặc chê món ăn, quần áo, ... - Đưa trẻ con vào tính kỉ luật để uốn nắn theo lẽ phải khi còn nhỏ - Ko truyền đat bạo lực, báo thù, độc ác - Không khoan dung nhân nhượng - Tập cho trẻ từ chối các thèm muốn và bỏ qua những đòi hỏi lúc còn nằm nôi: cho chúng biết ta cho chúng cái j đó ko phải để thoả mãn chúng mà vì điều ấy có ích cho chúng - Cho chúng thấy chính vì chúng nhõng nhẽo đòi hỏi để có bằng được thì việc có nó càng khó khăn hơn - Sự kỉ luật càng sớm càng tốt. Nhưng với một mức độ hợp lý vì khi bị kiềm chế qá chặt chẽ và cứng rắn, đứa trẻ đó sẽ mất lòng hăng hái, mất năng lực - Không nên sử dụng roi vọt, nó chỉ khiến trẻ con viện lý do để tránh né đau đớn - Nguyên tắc khen thưởng: không khuyến khích trẻ con quen thói tìm hạnh phúc nơi những phần thưởng, - Luôn xem trẻ con là những con người có lý trí - Danh dự và hổ thẹn là hai động cơ mạnh mẽ nhất đối với tâm trí. Nên vì vậy, dạy chúng yêu mến danh dự và sự hiểu biết thế nào là nhục nhã (thể hiện rõ cảm xúc buồn và thất vọng khi chúng làm sai thay vì dùng roi vọt ,vì trẻ con rất nhạy cảm với cảm xúc của người mà chúng đang nương tựa : cha, mẹ, ...) - Không nên nhồi nhét trí óc đứa trẻ trong mọi trường hợp. Thay vì thế, cho chúng quen dần thành nếp bằng việc lặp đi lặp lại việc đó nh lần. Khi chúng quên hoặc làm không đúng, khuyên bảo từ từ đến khi chúng thật sự hiểu và tiếp thu: dạy chúng làm và tập chúng làm! Thói quen của trẻ nên được bắt đầu bằng sự nhẹ nhàng, ân cần. Không nên tạo nh thói quen cùng một lúc - Cho chúng càng ít luật lệ hơn càng tốt vì những luật lệ đó chúng sẽ không hiểu mà chỉ làm vì bị ép buộc - Luôn tôn trọng chúng - Không nên làm gì mà ta không muốn chúng bắt chước làm theo. Vì khi ta làm sai mà chúng làm theo nhưng lại bị la rầy thì chúng sẽ nghĩ ta ngang ngươc và chuyên quyền - Nên lý luận rõ ràng với trẻ em vì chúng thích được cư xử như sinh vat có lí trí, làm điều đó như một cách giữ niềm kiêu hãnh giúp chúng . Nhưng phải là những lý luận ngắn gọn, rõ ràng và đơn giản với nhận thức của chúng (tránh dài dòng, kiểu mè nheo) - Dạy chúng biết xấu hổ trước những việc làm sai quấy - Sự nghiêm khắc nên được giảm dần theo thời gian khi chúng đã đủ trình để nhìn nhận mọi vấn đề. Lúc đấy, tâm sự chia sẻ là cách làm hiệu quả - Kích thích sự tò mò của trẻ một cách tích cực: không loại bỏ hay coi thường câu hỏi nào trẻ đặt ra; không để người khác chế nhạo những câu hỏi đó, giảng dạy để chúng hiểu theo tuổi của chúng; khuyến khích và gợi mở thêm để chúng tự tò mò; khen sau mỗi khi chúng thể hiện sự hiểu biết (giao cho chúng truyền lại kiến thức đó cho các em khác như một cách kích thích sự tìm hiểu vấn đề một cách chi tiết) - Tuyệt đối đừng bao h trả lời máy móc, hay trả lời bằng sự thiếu chính xác hoặc giả dối - 4 điều tối hậu được dạy trẻ con từ nhỏ: đức hạnh, sự khôn ngoan, phép lịch sự (đức dục) và học vấn (trí dục). Trong đó đức hạnh là tối quan trọng. Sự khôn ngoan là sự khéo léo và khả năng biết nhìn xa, điều mà không hợp để truyền dạy khi trẻ còn quá nhỏ, thay vì vậy, dạy để chúng ko mưu mẹo và mánh khoé, tập cho chúng có cái nhìn đúng đắn về mọi việc. Tiếp theo là phép lịch sự, bất lịch sự được hiểu theo 2 nghĩa: sự rụt rè và ngượng nghịu; sự vô ý tứ và thiếu tôn trọng người khác. Để tránh cả hai loại này ta chỉ cần tập cho chúng tuyệt đối thi hành hai điều luật: đừng nghĩ xấu về mình cũng như về người khác. Cuối cùng, học vấn là cần thiết nhưng lại không là thứ quan trọng. Ta cần đến học vấn nhưng chỉ nên đặt chúng ở hàng thứ yếu, vì học vấn lại phụ thuộc vào các đức tính cao cả hơn, và hãy xem học vấn là món quà được tặng thêm khi đã vẹn tròn đức dục. - Tránh xem học vấn như công việc và bổn phận đối với trẻ, mà biến nó thành trò chơi hoặc trò tiêu khiển. Cho chúng cảm nhận được việc học là đặc ân dành cho những con người đặc biệt - Trước khi nạp kiến thức cho trẻ, cần làm trống tâm trí trẻ để trẻ tiếp nhận vấn đề sâu hơn. Có nghĩa là ko làm cho trẻ cảm thấy sợ sệt hay dạy chúng lúc cảm xúc chúng đang còn tản mát ở chỗ khác , vì dù sao trẻ e là sinh vật còn mang hơi hướng bản năng động vật hơn là một sinh vật lý trí (chúng chỉ suy nghĩ được chỉ một vấn đề trong đầu, tâm lý mau thích và cũng mau chán, lúc thích thì phải có cho bằng được). Chính vì vậy, tài khéo léo của một người thầy là giữ được sự chú ý của học trò, được vậy trước tiên phải giúp chúng hiểu, và cho chúng biết lợi ích của việc hiểu nó và để chúng cảm nhận được ta yêu chúng và muốn mọi điều tốt dành cho chúng thay vì dùng uy quyền để bắt chúng tiếp thu - Chấp nhận được những tính trẻ con của trẻ (sơ suất, hay quên, nhẹ dạ, hay thay đổi ý kiến...), có nghĩa là khi chúng đôi ba lần thể hiện tính này, thay vì la mắng, ta nên nhỏ nhẹ nói chuyện và dẫn dắt chúng - Tóm lại, không thể dạy 2 đứa trẻ cùng một phương pháp vì mỗi trẻ mỗi khác. Nhưng khi dạy đứa con đầu tiên thành công, nó sẽ trở thành nền tảng để dễ dàng giáo huấn những đứa còn lại, nhất là đã có sẵn một hình mẫu lý tưởng trước đó cho chúng noi theo.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Yann

    Locke, un de mes philosophes favori, rassemble dans cet ouvrage un ensemble de propos issus de sa correspondance et relatifs à l'éducation des enfants, plus précisément des enfants de la petite noblesse anglaise. En effet, il ne s'agit pas ici d'un plan général d'éducation à la Coménius, ou d'un ouvrage philosophique comme l'Emile de Rousseau, mais simplement de conseils venus de la lecture et de l'observation, sans plan systématique. Ses principales sources sont Quintilien, mais surtout Montaig Locke, un de mes philosophes favori, rassemble dans cet ouvrage un ensemble de propos issus de sa correspondance et relatifs à l'éducation des enfants, plus précisément des enfants de la petite noblesse anglaise. En effet, il ne s'agit pas ici d'un plan général d'éducation à la Coménius, ou d'un ouvrage philosophique comme l'Emile de Rousseau, mais simplement de conseils venus de la lecture et de l'observation, sans plan systématique. Ses principales sources sont Quintilien, mais surtout Montaigne qu'il loue et dont il cite abondement les Essais. Pour l'éducation du corps, il conseille une vision un peu spartiate, consistant à endurcir le corps : je ne crois pas qu'il nous faille aller si loin de nos jours, vu les commodités qui nous entourent. Pour l'éducation de l'âme, Locke prône la sévérité pendant l'enfance, puis un relâchement progressif du joug, une fois que le respect du père est bien enraciné dans l'enfant. L'acquisition de valeurs morales est de loin ce qui lui semble le plus important, et pour les inculquer, il propose de s'appuyer sur l'honneur et la honte que doivent inspirer à l'enfant ses propres actions. Il rejette l'emploi des récompenses et des châtiments, les premiers ayant pour effet de substituer la recherche de profit au lieu de la conscience morale, et les derniers, il les réserve pour les cas extrêmes d'obstination et de rébellion. Pour l'instruction, il souhaite qu'elle soit faite par un précepteur, et non au sein d'un collège, et il rejette comme parfaitement inutile le fait de farcir la tête de grec, ou de faire peiner sur des dissertation latine l'enfant, mais plutôt le diriger vers l'apprentissage des langues vivantes - le français - , et surtout parfaire la connaissance de la grammaire anglaise. Il serait trop long de faire un exposé de toutes ces idées, mais la lecture de ce texte est agréable et intéressante, et permet de se faire une idée vivante et précise des question d'éducation au début du XVIIIème siècle. L'appareil critique est très bien.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Uyen Le

    1 cuốn sách mỏng, nhưng mà đọc lê la cả tháng. Có lẽ bởi cách dịch nên nhiều chỗ mình cứ phải đọc đi đọc lại, cố để hiểu tác giả muốn nói gì (và đôi khi vẫn không hiểu). Có khi đọc tiếng Anh sẽ thấm hơn. Dù sao đây cũng là lược dịch, bởi vậy nên đôi chỗ tuy mình có không đồng tình nhưng cũng không dựa vào đó mà đánh giá sách. Có thể trong bản gốc ngữ cảnh + lập luận đầy đủ hơn. Đa phần các luận điểm về cách giáo dục 1 đứa trẻ mà tác giả nêu ra mình đã biết qua. Có vài ý về việc áp đặt kỷ luật đã 1 cuốn sách mỏng, nhưng mà đọc lê la cả tháng. Có lẽ bởi cách dịch nên nhiều chỗ mình cứ phải đọc đi đọc lại, cố để hiểu tác giả muốn nói gì (và đôi khi vẫn không hiểu). Có khi đọc tiếng Anh sẽ thấm hơn. Dù sao đây cũng là lược dịch, bởi vậy nên đôi chỗ tuy mình có không đồng tình nhưng cũng không dựa vào đó mà đánh giá sách. Có thể trong bản gốc ngữ cảnh + lập luận đầy đủ hơn. Đa phần các luận điểm về cách giáo dục 1 đứa trẻ mà tác giả nêu ra mình đã biết qua. Có vài ý về việc áp đặt kỷ luật đã thông não cho mình, giúp mình bớt lăn tăn hơn. Sách cũng nói về nguyên tắc thưởng-phạt. Trước giờ mình cũng vài lần áp dụng (theo hướng sai nhưng bản thân có rất nhiều cớ để lờ đi chuyện đó). Đọc sách như đang tự soi lại hành động và mindset của bản thân, và tự thấy sống lỗi tương đối nhiều 🥺 Tư tưởng của John Lock ở vào cái thời của ông quả thực là rất tiến bộ. Mình nghĩ đây là 1 cuốn sách khá useful cho người làm cha mẹ, người quan tâm đến giáo dục (hoặc không quan tâm cũng nên đọc), vì nó tổng hợp, hệ thống lại những kiến thức mà (có thể là) ta đã gom nhặt được ở chỗ này chỗ kia. Trích ở đây 1 câu mình rất thích trong sách, đại ý: "Chúng không thể học được gì khi mà trí óc bị 1 xúc động mạnh làm xáo trộn, nhất là sự sợ hãi... Hãy giữ trí óc trẻ trong 1 trạng thái thoải mái, yên tĩnh nếu ta muốn nó học những gì mà ta dạy và thâu thập những kiến thức mới. Ta không thể viết những chữ đẹp và đều đặn lên 1 trí óc đang run sợ cũng như là viết trên 1 trang giấy đang rung động". Sẽ còn phải đọc lại và take note. 3.5*

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mr.

    Of course John Locke's tabula rasa has been more or less debunked by the cognitive revolution of the 20th century, but this work still remains one of the most important works of political education in all of political philosophy. Locke believes that "the minds of children" are turned as easily as the direction of water. His goal is to direct the minds of children in such a way as to lead England in the modern world. Locke's vision of education is one of obedience and control, which in turn, is f Of course John Locke's tabula rasa has been more or less debunked by the cognitive revolution of the 20th century, but this work still remains one of the most important works of political education in all of political philosophy. Locke believes that "the minds of children" are turned as easily as the direction of water. His goal is to direct the minds of children in such a way as to lead England in the modern world. Locke's vision of education is one of obedience and control, which in turn, is followed by trust and release. It is the modern form of parenting. He writes: "The first thing they should learn to know should be that they were not to have anything because it pleased them, but because it was fit for them" (29). Locke's educational philosophy echoes the instructions for living virtuously by Aristotle in his Nichomachean Ethics. The goal is to enable the child to strive as a reasonable creature, although it is the parent that instills this reason, not the individual itself that crafts his own mind and behavior. This is the dominant perspective on education in the west; it is rivaled only by Rousseau and Dewey.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cameron

    Even in the preface, the editor noted Locke's rejection of rhetorical theory and rhetorical training, but lo and behold, Locke advises teachers and parents to essentially have their children do preliminary rhetorical exercises at early ages (e.g., the progymnasmata of writing fables), read and practice rules from Cicero's De Inventione, learn to discern patterns in writing and produce daily imitations, and even to abstract and master a theory of letter writing from reading examples of Vincent Vo Even in the preface, the editor noted Locke's rejection of rhetorical theory and rhetorical training, but lo and behold, Locke advises teachers and parents to essentially have their children do preliminary rhetorical exercises at early ages (e.g., the progymnasmata of writing fables), read and practice rules from Cicero's De Inventione, learn to discern patterns in writing and produce daily imitations, and even to abstract and master a theory of letter writing from reading examples of Vincent Voitures' poetic letters to friends and Cicero's Epistles, a set of letters dealing with business and conversation. Maybe what Locke hated so much was the unnecessary rote memorization of figures and tropes. The rest of this book is as expected. It follows from a very Lockean tone: don't discipline, but don't spoil; education should not be deployed for the soul purpose of producing university scholars; avoid vices and lecture on practical virtues, etc. It should all sound familiar.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Upendra Singh

    Myself, UPENDRA SINGH from India, second the approach of Elizabeth in her comment but there is something more to appreciable in this classic. Whene we compare the philosophy of Education in writing of Plato we find that he was trying to built a pre-planned character sutable to the unity of the STATE but Locke shows that Skills and knowledge are acquired by example and practice instead of charging of children's memories with rules and principals. Again he underlined the importance of the Role of Myself, UPENDRA SINGH from India, second the approach of Elizabeth in her comment but there is something more to appreciable in this classic. Whene we compare the philosophy of Education in writing of Plato we find that he was trying to built a pre-planned character sutable to the unity of the STATE but Locke shows that Skills and knowledge are acquired by example and practice instead of charging of children's memories with rules and principals. Again he underlined the importance of the Role of teacher and parents.Accordind to him the goal of the gentlemen's education cannot be achieved by sending him to a school. Learning should be superintended by a tutor assisted by interested parents.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Schwarze

    Interested in morning swims in cold water? Looking for a solution to costiveness? Well, look no further.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    Didactic, pragmatic, perfect for Locke's "man of business." Didactic, pragmatic, perfect for Locke's "man of business."

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Incredibly illuminating. Amazing how formative this work obviously was for our current public education system.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...