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A Whole New Engineer: The Coming Revolution in Engineering Education

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This book tells the improbable stories of Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, a small startup in Needham, Massachusetts, with aspirations to be a beacon to engineering education everywhere, and the iFoundry incubator at the University of Illinois, an unfunded pilot program with aspirations to change engi- neering at a large public university that wasn’t particularly i This book tells the improbable stories of Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, a small startup in Needham, Massachusetts, with aspirations to be a beacon to engineering education everywhere, and the iFoundry incubator at the University of Illinois, an unfunded pilot program with aspirations to change engi- neering at a large public university that wasn’t particularly interested in changing. That either one survived is story enough, but what they found out together changes the course of education transformation forever: *How joy, trust, openness, and connec- tion are the keys to unleashing young, courageous engineers. *How engineers educated in narrow technical terms with a fixed mindset need an education that actively engages six minds—analytical, design, people, linguistic, body, and mindful— using a growth mindset. * How emotion and culture are the crucial elements of change, not content, curriculum, and pedagogy. *How four technologies of trust are well established and widely available to promote more rapid academic change. *How all stakeholders can join together in a movement of open innovation to accelerate collaborative disruption of the status quo. Read this book and get a glimpse inside the coming revolution in engineering. Feel the engaging stories in this book and understand the depth of change that is coming. Use this book to help select, shape, demand, and create educational experiences aligned with the creative imperative of the twenty-first century.


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This book tells the improbable stories of Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, a small startup in Needham, Massachusetts, with aspirations to be a beacon to engineering education everywhere, and the iFoundry incubator at the University of Illinois, an unfunded pilot program with aspirations to change engi- neering at a large public university that wasn’t particularly i This book tells the improbable stories of Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, a small startup in Needham, Massachusetts, with aspirations to be a beacon to engineering education everywhere, and the iFoundry incubator at the University of Illinois, an unfunded pilot program with aspirations to change engi- neering at a large public university that wasn’t particularly interested in changing. That either one survived is story enough, but what they found out together changes the course of education transformation forever: *How joy, trust, openness, and connec- tion are the keys to unleashing young, courageous engineers. *How engineers educated in narrow technical terms with a fixed mindset need an education that actively engages six minds—analytical, design, people, linguistic, body, and mindful— using a growth mindset. * How emotion and culture are the crucial elements of change, not content, curriculum, and pedagogy. *How four technologies of trust are well established and widely available to promote more rapid academic change. *How all stakeholders can join together in a movement of open innovation to accelerate collaborative disruption of the status quo. Read this book and get a glimpse inside the coming revolution in engineering. Feel the engaging stories in this book and understand the depth of change that is coming. Use this book to help select, shape, demand, and create educational experiences aligned with the creative imperative of the twenty-first century.

30 review for A Whole New Engineer: The Coming Revolution in Engineering Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Athena

    A Whole New Engineer identifies key emotional and cultural changes necessary to educate innovative engineers for the 21st century. As an engineering student, the ideas presented in the book truly resonated with me because I had always assumed educational reform was in the hands of administrators, professors, and policy makers and emphasized curriculum and pedagogy. This book presents the greater challenge of transforming the culture of engineering education and strategies for reform and offered A Whole New Engineer identifies key emotional and cultural changes necessary to educate innovative engineers for the 21st century. As an engineering student, the ideas presented in the book truly resonated with me because I had always assumed educational reform was in the hands of administrators, professors, and policy makers and emphasized curriculum and pedagogy. This book presents the greater challenge of transforming the culture of engineering education and strategies for reform and offered me an entirely new perspective on engineering education - one where the student voice demands to be heard. The stories chronicled in A Whole New Engineer demonstrate the power of student initiative and unleashing student potential, and they have encouraged me to reflect on my own experiences in engineering and what I hope to gain from my four years in college. I highly recommend this book to all engineering students, in particularly students who are unhappy in engineering or are frustrated with their education. This book offers a fresh perspective on engineering education and reads as a narrative, which is a welcome change from reading technical literature. A Whole New Engineer invites students to challenge the status quo and actively engage in the revolution to reform our education.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    A Whole New Engineer is a book for anyone who wants to join the movement in transforming engineering education. As an Canadian engineering graduate myself, I am passionate about engineering education, and the ideas and ideals in A Whole New Engineer are exactly what universities need to be listening to. There is so much to learn from the transformation stories Olin College and iFoundary at the University of Illinois. The success of iFoundary in an established engineering program gives hope for en A Whole New Engineer is a book for anyone who wants to join the movement in transforming engineering education. As an Canadian engineering graduate myself, I am passionate about engineering education, and the ideas and ideals in A Whole New Engineer are exactly what universities need to be listening to. There is so much to learn from the transformation stories Olin College and iFoundary at the University of Illinois. The success of iFoundary in an established engineering program gives hope for engineering education reform in universities all over the world. Having a well-rounded engineering education and engineers with all six minds (analytical, design, linguistic, people, body and mindful) is of the utmost importance. Reform is coming for engineering education and I am so excited to see a whole new engineer emerge!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ope Bukola

    Engineering a new edu model interesting look at the founding of Olin college and their partnership with ifoundry in Illinois. This is a great read for anyone interested transforming higher education and what it means to educate students for the 21st century.

  4. 5 out of 5

    John Kelley

    A very readable text. The beginning and the formation of Olin was the most interesting part of the book, but can certainly appreciate the points made about the desire for transformation of engineering education. No doubt that it is an uphill battle. Seems to me that it should start at the K-12 level. If students are brought up in these environments, they will help to transform even more rapidly their education at the next level. The authors talk about ownership by the students, so seems to me th A very readable text. The beginning and the formation of Olin was the most interesting part of the book, but can certainly appreciate the points made about the desire for transformation of engineering education. No doubt that it is an uphill battle. Seems to me that it should start at the K-12 level. If students are brought up in these environments, they will help to transform even more rapidly their education at the next level. The authors talk about ownership by the students, so seems to me that should be a big focus. As the next generation of educators they will bring that perspective to their own careers. If inroads are made, it seems logical that things can take off from there. The question is from how much of the indoctrination can they be weened? It's like institutional hazing, you've been a part of it, so you pass it own. What usually stops it? Some public catastrophe, so hopefully what the authors predict as could be worst-possible case outcome, fails to pass, but it seems there needs to be something splashier that grabs the attention and imagination of the public. Olin is great. IFoundry has its mark. WPI and Delft are other examples they cite. Until you can get the behemoths to change, it looks like a tough row to hoe. All of the items they mention about being transformative, courage, trust, collaboration, etc., are common-sense in terms of being good citizens of the teaching world and the world-at-large. Hopefully, there is a groundswell at some point of like-minded individuals (they do talk about the movement), but there will always be hold outs. Personalities will come into play. However, those who do hold to the fringes will marginalized by the public's choices. Students don't take a certain professor's classes, or rate him badly, and it is either change or move on. I'm not sure the authors really present the answers. Yes there is organizational, brain and social change research, but nothing prescriptive here. Instead, someone reading it can hopefully have a spark of an idea and say, "we can make that happen here."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    This is a fascinating book about the current state of engineering education, and specifically the experiment going on at Olin College of Engineering to revolutionize how we educate and motivate new engineers. As someone who has a master's degree in engineering, I found it interesting to read why engineering education is so structured for a field that values creativity and innovation. I definitely recommend this to anyone who is in the field of engineering education, or has a college bound studen This is a fascinating book about the current state of engineering education, and specifically the experiment going on at Olin College of Engineering to revolutionize how we educate and motivate new engineers. As someone who has a master's degree in engineering, I found it interesting to read why engineering education is so structured for a field that values creativity and innovation. I definitely recommend this to anyone who is in the field of engineering education, or has a college bound student who wants to study engineering. Hope this book instigates some much needed change!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Judebert

    While the book makes a convincing argument for changing engineering education, it often wanders into dry, uninspiring territory. Folks who are interested in the topic will find this an outstanding read; those who are looking for the excitement of "The Coming Revolution" will have to look elsewhere. While the book makes a convincing argument for changing engineering education, it often wanders into dry, uninspiring territory. Folks who are interested in the topic will find this an outstanding read; those who are looking for the excitement of "The Coming Revolution" will have to look elsewhere.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Allen Downey

    Excellent presentation of the history of Olin College and the iFoundry at UIUC, explaining in depth the motivation for the new schools and the impact they have had so far.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Chisa

    I'm biased, but I loved getting to read about Olin as an external observer. I'm biased, but I loved getting to read about Olin as an external observer.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dan Masterson

  10. 5 out of 5

    maharishi

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steve Kreh

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elide

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lina Rengifo

  14. 4 out of 5

    Big Beacon

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sean Munson

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gastón Mousqués

  18. 5 out of 5

    Biaz Surya

  19. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey Pleiss

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Thomas A.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nina

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pabloa

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jaime Hernandez

  25. 5 out of 5

    Douglas A Campbell

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jovany Agathe

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ratnakar Chowdary

  29. 5 out of 5

    Erhardt Graeff

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dena Burnett

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