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Load Poems Like Guns: Women's Poetry from Herat, Afghanistan

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"This unique contribution fills a gap in our understanding of the Afghan people, their history and society. It is a must read."—Nancy Hatch Dupree, Afghanistan Centre at Kabul University A groundbreaking collection of poetry by eight contemporary Afghan women poets in English translation en face with the original Persian Dari text. These poets live in Herat, the ancient epi "This unique contribution fills a gap in our understanding of the Afghan people, their history and society. It is a must read."—Nancy Hatch Dupree, Afghanistan Centre at Kabul University A groundbreaking collection of poetry by eight contemporary Afghan women poets in English translation en face with the original Persian Dari text. These poets live in Herat, the ancient epicenter of literature and the arts. Frazana Marie is a Ph.D. candidate in Middle Eastern literature at the University of Arizona. She served as an active duty officer for over six years including two years of deployed service in Afghanistan. She is president of Civil Vision International, a nonprofit focusing on influencing international relationships.


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"This unique contribution fills a gap in our understanding of the Afghan people, their history and society. It is a must read."—Nancy Hatch Dupree, Afghanistan Centre at Kabul University A groundbreaking collection of poetry by eight contemporary Afghan women poets in English translation en face with the original Persian Dari text. These poets live in Herat, the ancient epi "This unique contribution fills a gap in our understanding of the Afghan people, their history and society. It is a must read."—Nancy Hatch Dupree, Afghanistan Centre at Kabul University A groundbreaking collection of poetry by eight contemporary Afghan women poets in English translation en face with the original Persian Dari text. These poets live in Herat, the ancient epicenter of literature and the arts. Frazana Marie is a Ph.D. candidate in Middle Eastern literature at the University of Arizona. She served as an active duty officer for over six years including two years of deployed service in Afghanistan. She is president of Civil Vision International, a nonprofit focusing on influencing international relationships.

30 review for Load Poems Like Guns: Women's Poetry from Herat, Afghanistan

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This is a wonderful and powerful collection of poems by Afghan women translated by Farzana Marie. The introduction is excellently done and gives readers a better understanding of Afghanistan history, specifically Herat. For those who are multilingual, the poems in their original state are also included with notes on their translation.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    Having read this after foreign troops have left Afghanistan in August 2021, I wonder are these women safe? Will they be able to continue their work? Will they be repressed again under Taliban rule? But that’s not a book review, is it? I don’t know enough about poetry to comment on formats and styles, but I do know these women’s words are powerful.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    It was interesting to read this book in contrast to "I am the beggar of the world: Obviously these women were educated enough to write poetry whereas in "I am the beggar..." the women depended on more of an oral tradition. It was interesting to read this book in contrast to "I am the beggar of the world: Obviously these women were educated enough to write poetry whereas in "I am the beggar..." the women depended on more of an oral tradition.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kennedy

    wish i could know more about the translations and choices made to do so

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tonymess

    …poetry, with its symbolic language, is being explored and effectively used as a powerful means of protest against gender discrimination and injustice… (taken from the Foreword) From the mid 1990’s through to 2001, during the Taliban rule in Afghanistan, the regime restricted reading, writing and all forms of education for women in the country. Herat, with a lively arts culture, and a stronghold of literature and poetry, whilst underground, managed to continue female involvement in education, rea …poetry, with its symbolic language, is being explored and effectively used as a powerful means of protest against gender discrimination and injustice… (taken from the Foreword) From the mid 1990’s through to 2001, during the Taliban rule in Afghanistan, the regime restricted reading, writing and all forms of education for women in the country. Herat, with a lively arts culture, and a stronghold of literature and poetry, whilst underground, managed to continue female involvement in education, reading and writing and after 2001 a new movement of women’s poetry became visible. Dwindling international military support accompanied by reduced development funding, recovering from the debacle of the 2014 presidential election, and potential negotiations with insurgents all bear serious implications for the situation of women in Afghan society. The broad spectrum of emotions, images and ideas represented in the post-Taliban poetry of Herati women is important for grasping layers of nuance in contemporary societal and gender issues that are often simplified for public consumption. Besides a Foreword and a substantial Introduction by the editor and translator of the collection, Farzana Marie, the collection opens with the poems of Nadia Anjuman, allegedly the most prominent of the post-Taliban female poets, a published writer who, at age 24, was killed by her husband. Interestingly the poems in this collection by Nadia Anjuman only cover the period 1999-2002, when the introduction speaks of her marriage in 2004, her poetry subsequently becoming darker and her first book being released in 2005 (interestingly the first published work by a female poet after the Taliban rule). Her husband spent a mere four months in jail for the murder and not having any works from the period after her marriage it is impossible to judge if there are any changes in her work post marriage. For my full review go to http://messybooker.blogspot.com.au/20...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Jackson

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    Casey

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    Ken LeBlond

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    Katie Mullaney

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    Marina Mogli

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    Patrick

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

  13. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

  14. 5 out of 5

    CBSD Library

  15. 4 out of 5

    Zoé

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  17. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Simmons

  18. 5 out of 5

    Abhinav Singh

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    E. Dyer

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jennvw

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karin karinto

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Ross

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    Katie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dipanwita

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Renée Oźlański

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    Rachel

  27. 5 out of 5

    Svante Sahle

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brianna

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

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