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Mother Goose - Special Limited Edition

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The classic Volland edition of Mother Goose makes a beautiful addition to any home library. Features more than 100 traditional rhymes, each accompanied by a full-page, full color illustration by Fredrick Richardson.


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The classic Volland edition of Mother Goose makes a beautiful addition to any home library. Features more than 100 traditional rhymes, each accompanied by a full-page, full color illustration by Fredrick Richardson.

30 review for Mother Goose - Special Limited Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    Absolutely essential for any child's library. I was raised on this book since before I knew how to speak. Nursery rhymes are so incredibly powerful. You can walk up to almost any American and say, "Little Jack Horner sat in a corner," and they will immediately respond, "Eating a Christmas pie." It's automatic. It's a very universal thing in the U.S.A. (Can't make any comments about other countries re: Mother Goose.) I love it. And this collection (published in 1915) is the "real" version, in my m Absolutely essential for any child's library. I was raised on this book since before I knew how to speak. Nursery rhymes are so incredibly powerful. You can walk up to almost any American and say, "Little Jack Horner sat in a corner," and they will immediately respond, "Eating a Christmas pie." It's automatic. It's a very universal thing in the U.S.A. (Can't make any comments about other countries re: Mother Goose.) I love it. And this collection (published in 1915) is the "real" version, in my mind. I grew up listening to these over and over and over and over again. Some are not as well known as others, but all are fun and catchy. I think nursery rhymes help children learn and grow, and I think nursery rhymes (the repetition, rhyming, easy memorization, and nonsense) helps their brains develop - not to mention their imagination! Old women are a main feature in nursery rhymes, and I would almost say I like the poems about old women best. We have the old woman who lived in a shoe, the old woman who lived under the hill, the old woman tossed in a blanket (OMG one of my all-time favorites), Old Mother Hubbard, the old woman who sold puddings and pies, the deaf old woman, and the old woman who lived on victuals and drink. I have this entire book memorized. Say any opening line to me from any nursery rhyme in this collection, and I can complete it for you. And the great thing is, so can everyone else - at least the familiar ones like Hickory Dickory Dock, Little Bo Peep, Jack Sprat, Little Miss Muffet, Old King Cole, etc. etc. There's also the more obscure ones, but I love them just as much. Bat, bat Come under my hat, And I'll give you a slice of bacon; And when I bake I'll give you a cake, If I am not mistaken. Or Pretty John Watts, We are troubled with rats, Will you drive them out of the house? We have mice, too, in plenty, That feast in the pantry, But let them stay And nibble away, What harm in a little brown mouse? The old-fashioned illustrations in this volume are wonderful, but of course I'm biased. My copy of this is duct-taped together and many pages are scotch-taped because it is so old and so well-loved. Absolutely one of the best books ever "written" - really it's more of an oral tradition passed down from generation to generation, but I think it's something that binds English-speakers together in a wonderful way. And it's not religious, nor political - anyone and everyone can learn and enjoy these poems. P.S. Even now (as adults!) my friends and family will quote nursery rhymes to each other in daily life. Whether children are present or not. And I love meeting child and being able to create an instant bond with her (or him) by reciting nursery rhymes at each other! This has helped me create an instant rapport with children who might otherwise be shy or scared around a new adult. :) Everyone loves nursery rhymes!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    This may well be my favorite version of the nursery rhymes. If I'd had this book as a child, with its wonderful art, I probably would have liked the nursery rhymes better than I did. (As I remember, I thought they were silly, although some of them were intriguing because they were so odd.) The Foreword, by Eulalie Osgood Grover (1915) provides background that I appreciate. She writes, - We do not hesitate to place this venerable classic on the shelf beside our Shakespeare, and to send our childre This may well be my favorite version of the nursery rhymes. If I'd had this book as a child, with its wonderful art, I probably would have liked the nursery rhymes better than I did. (As I remember, I thought they were silly, although some of them were intriguing because they were so odd.) The Foreword, by Eulalie Osgood Grover (1915) provides background that I appreciate. She writes, - We do not hesitate to place this venerable classic on the shelf beside our Shakespeare, and to send our children there for delight and inspiration. They will understand Shakespeare the better for having known and loved Mother Goose. - This present edition preserves the best of the verses which became so popular in England and America as to first demand their publication. If these are only the best, I wonder about the others -- there are at least 5 verses here that make no sense and have no cadence. I would have eliminated those. The A-B-C song is a nursery rhyme! That was new to me. A favorite: The man in the wilderness asked me How many strawberries grew in the sea. I answered him as I thought good, As many red herrings as grew in the wood. There are no page numbers, which makes this awkward for reference.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie

    Reading these nursery rhymes to Rosalind from the same book that my mom read them to me was certainly fun. I remembered so many more of the rhymes than I expected to, though some turned out to be pretty dark.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matthew James

    Humpty Dumpty is a normal human-sized old man egg. In the 1990 North American hand-drawn animated musical Cinar and Little Golden Book video, The Real Story of Humpty Dumpty, he sat on a wall and had a great fall and all the King’s horses and all the King’s men could not put him together again. Before he was up on the wall, he saved Princess Allegra from Glitch the witch and her poison custard pie then became the hero for the King’s kingdom after he started his journey to the palace by running a Humpty Dumpty is a normal human-sized old man egg. In the 1990 North American hand-drawn animated musical Cinar and Little Golden Book video, The Real Story of Humpty Dumpty, he sat on a wall and had a great fall and all the King’s horses and all the King’s men could not put him together again. Before he was up on the wall, he saved Princess Allegra from Glitch the witch and her poison custard pie then became the hero for the King’s kingdom after he started his journey to the palace by running away to the palace that was so deeper from the farm that belonged to Farmer Dumpty the fair light white skin old man peasant farmer. There, he was called a freak by the hens and the chickens in Farmer Dumpty’s henhouse then Farmer Dumpty told him not to mind the hens and the chickens and that it was just that he was different because something meant he was like the Ugly Duckling. Everyone on the farm laughed at him, and he ran away, but when he came back, he had grown into a handsome swan admired by everyone around. The story began not too many moons ago. Glitch’s street-smart cat, Scratch was working for her because she turned out to be the well-known one poor excuse to have for a witch. She told Scratch that there was a blue moon in the night sky and that she can only get at Allegra when there was a blue moon. She then also said that Allegra would not be around much longer once she fed her the poison custard pie. She checked her recipe for the poison custard pie then saw that it needed three fresh eggs in a wicked spell. If Humpty was not around to save Princess Allegra from Glitch and her poison custard pie, she would die by the time she would eat the poison custard pie. The point was that Glitch decided to poison the princess with the help of the poison custard pie because she did not want the princess around no more. Then in the 1987 North American real live action Wee Sing movie, King Cole’s Party, Humpty got put back together again, and he greeted Mary the beautiful and loveliest cutie girl that owned the little lamb, and her buddies, Jack and Jill the children that fell down the hill while they were fetching a pail of water, and Little Boy Blue the child shepherd that loved sleeping under his haystack and blew his golden horn really loud to help him call his dairy cows and his sheep in whenever they wandered off and found the Farmer in the Dell (Samuel Alexander Mowrey) to watch over his dairy cows and his sheep while he was gone who were heading for Old King Cole’s party in Old King Cole’s castle located in London, England in order to join Old King Cole the royal merry old soul king and his very good wife, the queen and their trumpeter and their servants and their subjects and their guests and their fiddlers three for a big celebration in order to celebrate the well-known 100 years of peace within the King’s kingdom. Mary made the white wool mittens all by herself from her very own lamb’s wool, and Jill brought her top favorite kitten because her pet mother cat had kittens, and Jack brought his warm yellow blanket that turned out to be his top favorite thing in the planet Earth world on the planet, Earth that he thought he would not give up ever, and Little Boy Blue brought his golden horn that he used to help him call his dairy cows and his sheep in whenever they wandered off until he found the Farmer in the Dell to watch over his dairy cows and his sheep while he was gone so that he’d keep an uh, you have to watch them every minute, you know. And Tweedle the quacking duck that turned out to be the leader of the six little ducks sent the finest and soft and light feather that he ever grew on his back during the Six Little Ducks song, and the Crooked Man sent his crooked and shiny and bright sixpence coin that he found upon the crooked stile during the There Was A Crooked Man song, and Humpty got Mary and her friends to the party on time with a magic word called “Please.” Then after Mary and her friends gave their gifts to the king, the king thanked them all for the greatest of gifts that were given from the heart because they made him get to feel like the king, and then he told the guests and the servants and the subjects to let the big dance begin. Mary and her friends sang and danced at the party of their lives for there would not be another one like it for 100 years, then after the party, they went home because Humpty saw to that. The king kept their presents because he would have traded everything on the table for the gifts the children gave from their hearts. In the 1991 North American real-live action Good Housekeeping Kids Sing Along episode, Melody Magic in Toyland, the sequel to the 1990 North American real-live action Good Housekeeping Kids Sing Along episode, Melody Magic in Musicland, the movie with the Chopsticks song and the This Old Man song and the Little Miss Muffet song and the The Itsy Bitsy Spider song and the Row Row Row Your Boat song and the The More We Get Together song and the Little Bo Peep/Three Little Kittens/Oh Where Oh Where Has My Little Dog Gone? medley song and the Oh Where Oh Where Has My Little Song Gone? song and the You Gotta Sing When Your Spirit Says Sing song and the Melody Magic song, Humpty was Josh’s Mother Goose toy, and he was with his good friends, Old King Cole the royal merry old soul king and the Cat with the Fiddle. They felt surprised and shocked to see that Josh was too old to play with them and they explained this to Melody Magic (Dina James) and their brand-new friend, Josh’s computer (Liam Macintosh) that sang and danced and performed the I’m A Computer song in order to teach Melody and her friends everything about computer technology on computers. Then Melody introduced the computer to her friends. Old King Cole sang the Be True To Your Heart song in order to teach us how to be true to our hearts and be all-heart. Being all-heart is Old King Cole’s way of being a friend. The cat sang the I’m A Cool Cat song in order to teach us how to count and be cool cats. Being a cool cat is the cat’s great way of being a friend. Humpty sang the I’m A Good Egg song on his wall when he decided to teach everyone much about how to be good eggs. When he sat on the wall, he was the main singer, and the two flowers that grew by his wall were the back singers. They worked together to sing the I’m A Good Egg song in order to teach us how to be good eggs. Being a good egg is Humpty’s great way of being a friend. Then after the song, Humpty had a great fall with a very loud crash that woke Josh up. Josh was so surprised and very shocked to see Humpty in pieces and he wanted to know how Humpty and Melody and the cat and Old King Cole got to his bedroom. They had to find a way to save Humpty, and they found a way to save Humpty. It was Josh’s computer (Liam Macintosh). The five friends worked together to save Humpty, then when Humpty got right up again, he was all put together again, thanks to Josh and the computer. Humpty thanked the computer for saving his life then the computer said that it was nothing and Melody told the computer that saving Humpty’s life was important and she then also told the computer that he was really a good egg. Then Melody sang the Everybody Needs A Friend song to show Josh and her friends and the computer what it means to be put in need of a friend to tell their troubles to. That turned out to be Melody’s great way to have friends. Then after the song, Melody shook hands with Josh and she then Josh hugged each other and Humpty and the computer and the cat and Old King Cole felt grateful for Melody for saving Josh. Josh asked Melody if he was awake, then Melody told him that it was only a dream. She gave Josh a kiss because she loved him and then she then the computer and their friends were back to where they should be. Then in the next morning, Josh’s mom (Babe Hack) woke him up for breakfast time, then Josh told his mom that he wanted to keep Humpty and the cat and Old King Cole, then his mom was glad he wanted to keep his old friends and they hugged each other with happiness joy thanks to Melody saving Josh all the way from being too old for Humpty and the cat and Old King Cole with the help of Humpty and the cat and the computer and Old King Cole.

  5. 4 out of 5

    E

    This book has nearly every Mother Goose rhyme, from the blaringly familiar to the less known: "I met a little old man Who wouldn't say his prayers I took him by the left leg And threw him down the stairs..." *** "There was a man in our town And he was wondrous wise He jumped into a bramble bush And scratched out both his eyes..." *** "Ladybird, ladybird, Fly away home Your house is on fire Your children will burn" The art nouveau illustrations are equally mad - no chubby-cheeked Disney smiles here, but scream This book has nearly every Mother Goose rhyme, from the blaringly familiar to the less known: "I met a little old man Who wouldn't say his prayers I took him by the left leg And threw him down the stairs..." *** "There was a man in our town And he was wondrous wise He jumped into a bramble bush And scratched out both his eyes..." *** "Ladybird, ladybird, Fly away home Your house is on fire Your children will burn" The art nouveau illustrations are equally mad - no chubby-cheeked Disney smiles here, but screaming children, weapon-wielding thieves, and callous spirits toying with the terrestrial. (Arthur Rackham fans will especially enjoy the style.) That said, I had a profound (perhaps sick) fascination with it as a child and still do. I was usually upset easily by violence, but I would pore over the images for (what seemed like) hours, and I think that helped blunt the brutality of the texts once I was old enough to read them. It's Medieval and Victorian art and wit in all its glory. It makes you realize that Jack breaking his crown is also quite horrible when you think about it, but looking back on your childhood would you forego him and Jill?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jillian

    This is the version of Mother Goose I remember reading from as a very small child (aged 3-5). Although my copy was green... I'd been looking for this book for years because the images just stayed with me. I'd read other versions from the library to my children, but it just wasn't the same. I didn't know the illustrator's name or else I would have gone out and purchased it. But...imagine my surprise (and delight!!) when I found it at a thrift shop. Now, I can read these rhymes to my children feeli This is the version of Mother Goose I remember reading from as a very small child (aged 3-5). Although my copy was green... I'd been looking for this book for years because the images just stayed with me. I'd read other versions from the library to my children, but it just wasn't the same. I didn't know the illustrator's name or else I would have gone out and purchased it. But...imagine my surprise (and delight!!) when I found it at a thrift shop. Now, I can read these rhymes to my children feeling a little more complete.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Skylar Burris

    I have an older, worn, hardback version of this that, as a child, I read incessantly, memorizing many of the rhymes. My preschool daughter now enjoys the same book, which I have kept all these years. Many of the rhymes are older, slightly unfamiliar (to modern kids) forms, and none of them make much of any sense to moderns any longer, but the rhyme still tempts the ear and the pictures still delight my daughter.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elana

    This was my grandfather's book. It was published in 1915. Some of the stories are so gruesome but others are very funny. I am thoroughly enjoying it, but not sure I will read it to my kids. I think it would give kids nightmares! This was my grandfather's book. It was published in 1915. Some of the stories are so gruesome but others are very funny. I am thoroughly enjoying it, but not sure I will read it to my kids. I think it would give kids nightmares!

  9. 4 out of 5

    B.B.

    More good quality childhood nostalgic nursery rhymes. Yeah.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

    On the hardcover shelf.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rick Davis

    This is the Mother Goose that I grew up on. It's also the best Mother Goose ever and deserves a billion stars. There is no possibility for disagreement on this point. This is the Mother Goose that I grew up on. It's also the best Mother Goose ever and deserves a billion stars. There is no possibility for disagreement on this point.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary Daly

    What's not to love? Planning on using some of these traditional rhymes in my ESOL class to help with rhythm of speech and pronunciation. What's not to love? Planning on using some of these traditional rhymes in my ESOL class to help with rhythm of speech and pronunciation.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    There are some children's books from childhood that we girls find it really hard to give up. This is mine. There are some children's books from childhood that we girls find it really hard to give up. This is mine.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    used in class to explain rhyming and short stories tall tales

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    This is my Mother Goose. I had two sets in two sizes of these rhymes and pictures. My younger siblings had/have a different Mother Goose book because this one definitely didn't last through 25 years. But this one is the one I love. This art is my favorite kind. And it taught me a lot about history just by looking at the art. Thanks to Frederick Richardson, the artist! He was a more conscientious artist and one person on this earth is so glad he was. I am currently wanting to learn to draw like h This is my Mother Goose. I had two sets in two sizes of these rhymes and pictures. My younger siblings had/have a different Mother Goose book because this one definitely didn't last through 25 years. But this one is the one I love. This art is my favorite kind. And it taught me a lot about history just by looking at the art. Thanks to Frederick Richardson, the artist! He was a more conscientious artist and one person on this earth is so glad he was. I am currently wanting to learn to draw like him. We'll see how I can do it and how long it takes.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    My favorite thing about this book were the illustrations that went along with some of the poems. The illustrations are a full page with the one poem written on them. Some pages don't have illustrations, just several poems. A good many don't really make sense to the kids nowadays, but Gabe still loved the rhyming, alliterations, and the like. My favorite thing about this book were the illustrations that went along with some of the poems. The illustrations are a full page with the one poem written on them. Some pages don't have illustrations, just several poems. A good many don't really make sense to the kids nowadays, but Gabe still loved the rhyming, alliterations, and the like.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jonah

    Kids liked it. Some of the old poems were a bit strange, but they were enjoyable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jérémie Moenne Loccoz

    I have not been raised with these rhymes and lullabies so no nostalgic feeling for me here. If I recognize the quality of the artwork, I do not care much for these verses that failed to move me in any way.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Astudillo

    A wonderful addition to any home or school teachers' library, this book is incredibly powerful. It has nearly every Mother Goose rhyme from the familiar to unfamiliar. I grew up on these nursery rhymes and poems and used this book to teach English to many of my students to help with rhythm of speech and pronunciation. The full page illustrations by Fredrick Richardson that accompany the rhymes are beautiful and self explanatory. The target audience of this book is 3-8years olds, however adults o A wonderful addition to any home or school teachers' library, this book is incredibly powerful. It has nearly every Mother Goose rhyme from the familiar to unfamiliar. I grew up on these nursery rhymes and poems and used this book to teach English to many of my students to help with rhythm of speech and pronunciation. The full page illustrations by Fredrick Richardson that accompany the rhymes are beautiful and self explanatory. The target audience of this book is 3-8years olds, however adults of any age could enjoy this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michi

    I own a fairly old version of this inherited from my mum who inherited it from my grandmum and it basically contains all the most common nursery rhymes. While I wouldn't necessarily read some of them to a child, it would still be really fun to go through them again and research the historical significance. I own a fairly old version of this inherited from my mum who inherited it from my grandmum and it basically contains all the most common nursery rhymes. While I wouldn't necessarily read some of them to a child, it would still be really fun to go through them again and research the historical significance.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bron

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mariah

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paula

  25. 4 out of 5

    Megan Mcallister

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Shafer

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Benson

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alexis

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