Hot Best Seller

Somebody Scream!: Rap Music's Rise to Prominence in the Aftershock of Black Power

Availability: Ready to download

For many African Americans of a certain demographic the sixties and seventies were the golden age of political movements. The Civil Rights movement segued into the Black Power movement which begat the Black Arts movement. Fast forward to 1979 and the release of Sugarhill Gang's Rapper's Delight. With the onset of the Reagan years, we begin to see the unraveling of many of For many African Americans of a certain demographic the sixties and seventies were the golden age of political movements. The Civil Rights movement segued into the Black Power movement which begat the Black Arts movement. Fast forward to 1979 and the release of Sugarhill Gang's Rapper's Delight. With the onset of the Reagan years, we begin to see the unraveling of many of the advances fought for in the previous decades. Much of this occurred in the absence of credible, long-term leadership in the black community. Young blacks disillusioned with politics and feeling society no longer cared or looked out for their concerns started rapping with each other about their plight, becoming their own leaders on the battlefield of culture and birthing Hip-Hop in the process. In Somebody Scream, Marcus Reeves explores hip-hop music and its politics. Looking at ten artists that have impacted rap--from Run-DMC (Black Pop in a B-Boy Stance) to Eminem (Vanilla Nice)--and puts their music and celebrity in a larger socio-political context. In doing so, he tells the story of hip hop's rise from New York-based musical form to commercial music revolution to unifying expression for a post-black power generation.


Compare

For many African Americans of a certain demographic the sixties and seventies were the golden age of political movements. The Civil Rights movement segued into the Black Power movement which begat the Black Arts movement. Fast forward to 1979 and the release of Sugarhill Gang's Rapper's Delight. With the onset of the Reagan years, we begin to see the unraveling of many of For many African Americans of a certain demographic the sixties and seventies were the golden age of political movements. The Civil Rights movement segued into the Black Power movement which begat the Black Arts movement. Fast forward to 1979 and the release of Sugarhill Gang's Rapper's Delight. With the onset of the Reagan years, we begin to see the unraveling of many of the advances fought for in the previous decades. Much of this occurred in the absence of credible, long-term leadership in the black community. Young blacks disillusioned with politics and feeling society no longer cared or looked out for their concerns started rapping with each other about their plight, becoming their own leaders on the battlefield of culture and birthing Hip-Hop in the process. In Somebody Scream, Marcus Reeves explores hip-hop music and its politics. Looking at ten artists that have impacted rap--from Run-DMC (Black Pop in a B-Boy Stance) to Eminem (Vanilla Nice)--and puts their music and celebrity in a larger socio-political context. In doing so, he tells the story of hip hop's rise from New York-based musical form to commercial music revolution to unifying expression for a post-black power generation.

30 review for Somebody Scream!: Rap Music's Rise to Prominence in the Aftershock of Black Power

  1. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Enjoyable and informative book about the history of rap music in the context of the day's politics. Somebody Scream! focuses on how messages about poverty, black nationalism, political power, and racism are transmitted by, and through, rap. Reeves has a way with words reminiscent of the elaborate wordplay in rap itself; the book is plenty humorous although the subject is always taken seriously. Through the extensive use of well-chosen lyrical quotes, he allows rappers to speak for themselves, wh Enjoyable and informative book about the history of rap music in the context of the day's politics. Somebody Scream! focuses on how messages about poverty, black nationalism, political power, and racism are transmitted by, and through, rap. Reeves has a way with words reminiscent of the elaborate wordplay in rap itself; the book is plenty humorous although the subject is always taken seriously. Through the extensive use of well-chosen lyrical quotes, he allows rappers to speak for themselves, while always providing robust context. I think that this would be a really enjoyable read for hiphop fans, as nothing is dumbed down (no "making cheddar does not, in fact, refer to a cheese factory!" jokes here). It is, however, an accessible pop culture read for a general audience. The book's flaws include a a disproportionate emphasis on the 80s and 90s--although the book was published in 2008, the 00s seem like an afterthought--as well as an occasional tendency to run a particular line of thought into the ground. [Disclaimer: my copy is an uncorrected proof from the publisher and may not accurately reflect the final book.]

  2. 5 out of 5

    R.K. Byers

    this book went the way Hunter S. Thompson describes good mescaline; “comes on slow... then ZANG!”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Finnell

    Library Journal Review: Drawing upon his fifteen years of experience writing on youth culture and politics in publications such as The New York Times and The Source, Reeves traces the political history and influence of rap since the decline of the black power movement in the 1970s. His thesis, succinctly stated, is that rap music is a “hardrock vessel carrying the hopes, anger, disappointments, attitude, and history of post-black power America.” Chronologically focusing on ten artists that have i Library Journal Review: Drawing upon his fifteen years of experience writing on youth culture and politics in publications such as The New York Times and The Source, Reeves traces the political history and influence of rap since the decline of the black power movement in the 1970s. His thesis, succinctly stated, is that rap music is a “hardrock vessel carrying the hopes, anger, disappointments, attitude, and history of post-black power America.” Chronologically focusing on ten artists that have impacted rap over the last three decades (from Run-DMC and Public Enemy to Eminem and Jay-Z), Reeves places each musician within the sociopolitical context of the times that produced them. Extending the historical analysis found in other works on the genre, such as Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation (Jeff Chang and D.J. Kool Herc. Picador. 2005), Reeves underscores the importance of rap as an art form that continues to evolve while remaining a viable means in which to channel future discourse of post-black power America.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kraig Spaven

    If you are looking for an easy read on the history of hip hop,this might be for you. It barely scratched the surface of such a deep history,& I was already familiar with most included anecdotes,so it didnt offer anything new for me. A history of hip hop that is going to give pages over to the (much deserved) importance of Rappers Delight to the developement of hip hop,yet barely mention Grandmaster Caz(and not go into the backstory of Rappers Delight's creation),is a much too simple view for mos If you are looking for an easy read on the history of hip hop,this might be for you. It barely scratched the surface of such a deep history,& I was already familiar with most included anecdotes,so it didnt offer anything new for me. A history of hip hop that is going to give pages over to the (much deserved) importance of Rappers Delight to the developement of hip hop,yet barely mention Grandmaster Caz(and not go into the backstory of Rappers Delight's creation),is a much too simple view for most people with a more than passing knowledge of the artform. I guess for a complete newcomer to the history of hip hop,its a good jumping off point. I just feel strange seeing an artform with so much depth simplified so much.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Sellers

    Really the tale of two halves of a book. The first half is an interesting retelling of the failing of the black power music and how rap music rose from its ashes. The second a bland set of biographical chapters about famous rappers

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chi Chi

    Pretty decent overview of the history of hip hop. Not any particular stance that makes it stand out, but he does a decent job of placing the popular artists amongst society at the time.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brother

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dan Coleman

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katy

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Boscardin

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Etters

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Black

  14. 5 out of 5

    M Solomon

  15. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

  16. 5 out of 5

    Arman

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tara Walker

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Hernandez

  19. 4 out of 5

    Agymah

  20. 4 out of 5

    Reavis Castle

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gfortin21

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Samuelson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ringo P

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stan Staton

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melanie CJ

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mare

  30. 5 out of 5

    Daryl Grigsby

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...