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Folk City: New York and the American Folk Music Revival

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From Washington Square Park and the Gaslight Caf� to WNYC Radio and Folkways Records, New York City's cultural, artistic, and commercial assets helped to shape a distinctively urban breeding ground for the folk music revival of the 1950s and 60s. Folk City explores New York's central role in fueling the nationwide craze for folk music in postwar America. It involves the eff From Washington Square Park and the Gaslight Caf� to WNYC Radio and Folkways Records, New York City's cultural, artistic, and commercial assets helped to shape a distinctively urban breeding ground for the folk music revival of the 1950s and 60s. Folk City explores New York's central role in fueling the nationwide craze for folk music in postwar America. It involves the efforts of record company producers and executives, club owners, concert promoters, festival organizers, musicologists, agents and managers, editors and writers - and, of course, musicians and audiences. In Folk City, authors Stephen Petrus and Ron Cohen capture the exuberance of the times and introduce readers to a host of characters who brought a new style to the biggest audience in the history of popular music. Among the savvy New York entrepreneurs committed to promoting folk music were Izzy Young of the Folklore Center, Mike Porco of Gerde's Folk City, and John Hammond of Columbia Records. While these and other businessmen developed commercial networks for musicians, the performance venues provided the artists space to test their mettle. The authors portray Village coffee houses not simply as lively venues but as incubators of a burgeoning counterculture, where artists from diverse backgrounds honed their performance techniques and challenged social conventions. Accessible and engaging, fresh and provocative, rich in anecdotes and primary sources, Folk City is lavishly illustrated with images collected for the accompanying major exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York in 2015.


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From Washington Square Park and the Gaslight Caf� to WNYC Radio and Folkways Records, New York City's cultural, artistic, and commercial assets helped to shape a distinctively urban breeding ground for the folk music revival of the 1950s and 60s. Folk City explores New York's central role in fueling the nationwide craze for folk music in postwar America. It involves the eff From Washington Square Park and the Gaslight Caf� to WNYC Radio and Folkways Records, New York City's cultural, artistic, and commercial assets helped to shape a distinctively urban breeding ground for the folk music revival of the 1950s and 60s. Folk City explores New York's central role in fueling the nationwide craze for folk music in postwar America. It involves the efforts of record company producers and executives, club owners, concert promoters, festival organizers, musicologists, agents and managers, editors and writers - and, of course, musicians and audiences. In Folk City, authors Stephen Petrus and Ron Cohen capture the exuberance of the times and introduce readers to a host of characters who brought a new style to the biggest audience in the history of popular music. Among the savvy New York entrepreneurs committed to promoting folk music were Izzy Young of the Folklore Center, Mike Porco of Gerde's Folk City, and John Hammond of Columbia Records. While these and other businessmen developed commercial networks for musicians, the performance venues provided the artists space to test their mettle. The authors portray Village coffee houses not simply as lively venues but as incubators of a burgeoning counterculture, where artists from diverse backgrounds honed their performance techniques and challenged social conventions. Accessible and engaging, fresh and provocative, rich in anecdotes and primary sources, Folk City is lavishly illustrated with images collected for the accompanying major exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York in 2015.

30 review for Folk City: New York and the American Folk Music Revival

  1. 5 out of 5

    Susan Anderson

    A comprehensive and thorough examination of the folk music scene and how it got ramped up in the 50s and 60s in New York. It explains the rise of all of the major players, along with the record companies, record shops and producers who helped feature and promote it. I enjoyed it. Though it reads rather like a textbook, it gives you a good overview of the folk music scene, and everything connected with it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Don Pollock

    A great overview of the New York folk scene in the 1960's. Easy read A great overview of the New York folk scene in the 1960's. Easy read

  3. 5 out of 5

    False

    Interesting text and photographs of the folk boom in New York City. Many rarely seen, which was a relief.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    781.6213 P498 2015

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  6. 4 out of 5

    Desmond Brown

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ed

  8. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

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    Dino

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  11. 4 out of 5

    RICHARD WILLITS

  12. 4 out of 5

    John Dimoia

  13. 5 out of 5

    Celebrating Phil Ochs

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jan Voya

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emily Chiarvesio

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    John

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    Jack

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    Katie

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    Evan

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    Irina

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    Kheir

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    Aysel

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen Jacoby

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    David Pinter

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    Biff D

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paul Chiarvesio

  28. 5 out of 5

    mark…

  29. 4 out of 5

    Aunt

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

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