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Computers, Pattern, Chaos, and Beauty

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Combining fractal theory with computer art, this book introduces a creative use of computers. It describes graphic methods for detecting patterns in complicated data and illustrates simple techniques for visualizing chaotic behavior. "Beautiful." — Martin Gardner, Scientific American. Over 275 illustrations, 29 in color. Combining fractal theory with computer art, this book introduces a creative use of computers. It describes graphic methods for detecting patterns in complicated data and illustrates simple techniques for visualizing chaotic behavior. "Beautiful." — Martin Gardner, Scientific American. Over 275 illustrations, 29 in color.


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Combining fractal theory with computer art, this book introduces a creative use of computers. It describes graphic methods for detecting patterns in complicated data and illustrates simple techniques for visualizing chaotic behavior. "Beautiful." — Martin Gardner, Scientific American. Over 275 illustrations, 29 in color. Combining fractal theory with computer art, this book introduces a creative use of computers. It describes graphic methods for detecting patterns in complicated data and illustrates simple techniques for visualizing chaotic behavior. "Beautiful." — Martin Gardner, Scientific American. Over 275 illustrations, 29 in color.

30 review for Computers, Pattern, Chaos, and Beauty

  1. 4 out of 5

    Barnaby Sheeran

    This book blew my mind when I was young, and is fairly responsible for much of what occupies my brain most days.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    This had some good recipes for creating fractal and other chaos-based images. It got a little deep at times (at least for what I was looking for). If you aren't looking for detailed theory and explanations, you could probably read the first quarter of the book and get the idea of how some of these patterns can be generated (and give you ideas to try on your own. This had some good recipes for creating fractal and other chaos-based images. It got a little deep at times (at least for what I was looking for). If you aren't looking for detailed theory and explanations, you could probably read the first quarter of the book and get the idea of how some of these patterns can be generated (and give you ideas to try on your own.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jay Reynolds

    Filled with fun stuff for the programmer-artist-experimenter. Pickover is great - I love his enthusiastic pursuit of diverse interests (his fascination with life and everything in general) and his ability to make clear, eye-opening connections between so many different disciplines and ideas. Read Pickover and have an ah-ha moment for yourself.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Phil Watson

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mo Riza

  6. 4 out of 5

    Opal Trelore

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bill White

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ray

  9. 4 out of 5

    John

  10. 4 out of 5

    Misercord

  11. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nadim Ahmad Al-Hasani

  13. 5 out of 5

    Diana

  14. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mei Dean Francis

  16. 5 out of 5

    James Marland

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bill Swavely

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Gray

  20. 4 out of 5

    J

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  22. 4 out of 5

    Purnima Kamath

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joelle

  25. 4 out of 5

    Guru Truth

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ronen

  27. 5 out of 5

    BCS

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mark Lacy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mister

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hector

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