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Free Will and Predestination in Islamic Thought: Theoretical Compromises in the Works of Avicenna, al-Ghazali and Ibn 'Arabi (Culture and Civilization in the Middle East Book 42)

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The subject of "human free-will" versus "divine predestination" is one of the most contentious topics in classical Islamic thought. By focusing on a theme of central importance to any philosophy of religion, and to Islam in particular, this book offers a critical study of the intellectual contributions offered to this discourse by three key medieval Islamic thinkers: Avice The subject of "human free-will" versus "divine predestination" is one of the most contentious topics in classical Islamic thought. By focusing on a theme of central importance to any philosophy of religion, and to Islam in particular, this book offers a critical study of the intellectual contributions offered to this discourse by three key medieval Islamic thinkers: Avicenna, al-Gh z l and Ibn Arab . Through investigation of primary sources, "Free Will and Predestination in Islamic Thought "establishes the historical, political and intellectual circumstances which prompted Avicenna, al-Gh z l and Ibn Arab s attempts at harmonization. By analysing the theoretical and linguistic techniques which were employed to convey these endeavours, this book demonstrates that the three individuals were committed to compromise between philosophical, theological and mystical outlooks. Arguing that the three scholars treatments of the so-called "qa wa l-qadar" (decree and destiny) and "ikhtiy r" (free-will) issues were innovative, influential and fundamentally more complex than hitherto recognized, this book contributes to a fuller understanding of Islamic intellectual history and culture and will be useful to researchers interested in Islamic Studies, Religion and Islamic Mysticism.


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The subject of "human free-will" versus "divine predestination" is one of the most contentious topics in classical Islamic thought. By focusing on a theme of central importance to any philosophy of religion, and to Islam in particular, this book offers a critical study of the intellectual contributions offered to this discourse by three key medieval Islamic thinkers: Avice The subject of "human free-will" versus "divine predestination" is one of the most contentious topics in classical Islamic thought. By focusing on a theme of central importance to any philosophy of religion, and to Islam in particular, this book offers a critical study of the intellectual contributions offered to this discourse by three key medieval Islamic thinkers: Avicenna, al-Gh z l and Ibn Arab . Through investigation of primary sources, "Free Will and Predestination in Islamic Thought "establishes the historical, political and intellectual circumstances which prompted Avicenna, al-Gh z l and Ibn Arab s attempts at harmonization. By analysing the theoretical and linguistic techniques which were employed to convey these endeavours, this book demonstrates that the three individuals were committed to compromise between philosophical, theological and mystical outlooks. Arguing that the three scholars treatments of the so-called "qa wa l-qadar" (decree and destiny) and "ikhtiy r" (free-will) issues were innovative, influential and fundamentally more complex than hitherto recognized, this book contributes to a fuller understanding of Islamic intellectual history and culture and will be useful to researchers interested in Islamic Studies, Religion and Islamic Mysticism.

30 review for Free Will and Predestination in Islamic Thought: Theoretical Compromises in the Works of Avicenna, al-Ghazali and Ibn 'Arabi (Culture and Civilization in the Middle East Book 42)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan DalMonte

    A very informative, if slightly dry and technical book, that explores the fascinating issue of predestination and free will. De Cillis explores how Islamic thinkers imported Neoplatonic and Aristotelian metaphysics into their Islamic theology. The result is an amazing account of how evil is possible and how events in the world, including human action, transpire. The debates in Islamic thought are sophisticated, and are mirrored in the debates in the Christian world between Luther and Eramsus, as A very informative, if slightly dry and technical book, that explores the fascinating issue of predestination and free will. De Cillis explores how Islamic thinkers imported Neoplatonic and Aristotelian metaphysics into their Islamic theology. The result is an amazing account of how evil is possible and how events in the world, including human action, transpire. The debates in Islamic thought are sophisticated, and are mirrored in the debates in the Christian world between Luther and Eramsus, as well as debates about how God uses natural determinism to indirectly produce desired results, e.g. theistic evolution.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rizwan Raiyan

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abdulkadir Jailani

  4. 4 out of 5

    Omar

  5. 5 out of 5

    Fatima

  6. 4 out of 5

    afnan tulu

  7. 4 out of 5

    عرفان

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hendrik Lohuis

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jobber

  10. 4 out of 5

    یاسر میردامادی

  11. 5 out of 5

    Syamimi Azharuddin

  12. 4 out of 5

    Omer

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Hurtado

  14. 4 out of 5

    Raisuddin Rakib

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hamza

  16. 5 out of 5

    Harris

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alan

  18. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad Ismail

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sakey Sakey

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tarek Fouad

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daniyal

  22. 5 out of 5

    Abdulla

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mohammed Yusuf

  24. 5 out of 5

    MTE

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cakra Dermawan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tabsira Archives

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rabiya Shahnoor

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed Julker Nine

  29. 5 out of 5

    Faisal Hasan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shad Alam

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