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Why the Mind Is Not a Computer: A Pocket Lexicon of Neuromythology

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The equations 'Mind = Machine' is false. This pocket lexicon of 'neuromythology' shows why. Taking a series of key words such as calculation, language, information and memory, Professor Tallis shows how their misuse has lured a whole generation into accepting the computational model of the mind. The equations 'Mind = Machine' is false. This pocket lexicon of 'neuromythology' shows why. Taking a series of key words such as calculation, language, information and memory, Professor Tallis shows how their misuse has lured a whole generation into accepting the computational model of the mind.


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The equations 'Mind = Machine' is false. This pocket lexicon of 'neuromythology' shows why. Taking a series of key words such as calculation, language, information and memory, Professor Tallis shows how their misuse has lured a whole generation into accepting the computational model of the mind. The equations 'Mind = Machine' is false. This pocket lexicon of 'neuromythology' shows why. Taking a series of key words such as calculation, language, information and memory, Professor Tallis shows how their misuse has lured a whole generation into accepting the computational model of the mind.

44 review for Why the Mind Is Not a Computer: A Pocket Lexicon of Neuromythology

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robert Fischer

    If philosophy is the practice of being precise with speech and seeing where it gets you, then this book is a must for any philosopher with an interest in consciousness or the mind. It's a superb little read: very informative, thought-provoking, engaged with many conversations among leading philosophers, and genuinely funny in a way reminiscent of The Devil's Dictionary. This book basically goes through the computerization of the mind and the anthropomorphism of computers and shows how sloppiness If philosophy is the practice of being precise with speech and seeing where it gets you, then this book is a must for any philosopher with an interest in consciousness or the mind. It's a superb little read: very informative, thought-provoking, engaged with many conversations among leading philosophers, and genuinely funny in a way reminiscent of The Devil's Dictionary. This book basically goes through the computerization of the mind and the anthropomorphism of computers and shows how sloppiness with certain key linguistic phrases has created an illusion that we know more than we do about how consciousness works. The introduction and the section in "Information" are alone worth the price of entry. "Complexity" is also a great section. The downsides of this book are that it is 1) not constructive (although it doesn't ever purport to be); 2) even at its terse 93 pages, it's still about 10~15 pages too long, since the arguments get repetitive; 3) it needs a conclusion, especially since it ends with one of the least convincing/impressive critiques in the lexicon ("Rules"). I'm also unimpressed with the author's treatment of John R. Searle under "Levels", which seems to miss Searle's whole point about ontological frames (1st vs. 3rd person). But even with those complaints, this book is a must-read for people interested in the philosophy of mind, especially anyone who is impressed with Daniel Dennett or Michael Shermer. The author is astoundingly adroit within a whole series of fields, including computer science (my own specialty), and brings that to bear to check a lot of the sloppiness that goes unnoticed and uncriticized in conversations about the mind and brain.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ramzey

    Excellent book!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Klaus Kinski

  4. 5 out of 5

    ning

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Martin

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad

  7. 4 out of 5

    James Widdicombe

  8. 4 out of 5

    Terry Allen

  9. 4 out of 5

    Zawn V

  10. 4 out of 5

    Phil Christman

  11. 5 out of 5

    Virginia MD

  12. 5 out of 5

    Safety_safety

  13. 4 out of 5

    John

  14. 4 out of 5

    Colin Kline

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Peng

  17. 5 out of 5

    Clinton Conrad

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marc Adam

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    Steven

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    Douglas

  21. 5 out of 5

    John Warner

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    Stewart Hotston

  23. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Pfau

  24. 5 out of 5

    James

  25. 5 out of 5

    Yaser Sulaiman

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Arthur

  27. 4 out of 5

    Светлана

  28. 5 out of 5

    Frank Spencer

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kitap

  30. 5 out of 5

    Apemberton

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  32. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

  33. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  34. 5 out of 5

    Hariharan Gopalakrishnan

  35. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  36. 5 out of 5

    Craig Hodges

  37. 4 out of 5

    Bridget Schuil

  38. 4 out of 5

    George Pacheco

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jill Michaels

  40. 4 out of 5

    Brennan

  41. 5 out of 5

    Kody

  42. 4 out of 5

    Isao

  43. 4 out of 5

    Donald Forster

  44. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Freed

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