Hot Best Seller

Makin' Numbers: Howard Aiken and the Computer

Availability: Ready to download

This collection of technical essays and reminiscences is a companion volume to I. Bernard Cohen's biography, Howard Aiken: Portrait of a Computer Pioneer. After an overview by Cohen, Part I presents the first complete publication of Aiken's 1937 proposal for an automatic calculating machine, which was later realized as the Mark I, as well as recollections of Aiken's first This collection of technical essays and reminiscences is a companion volume to I. Bernard Cohen's biography, Howard Aiken: Portrait of a Computer Pioneer. After an overview by Cohen, Part I presents the first complete publication of Aiken's 1937 proposal for an automatic calculating machine, which was later realized as the Mark I, as well as recollections of Aiken's first two machines by the chief engineer in charge of construction of Mark II, Robert Campbell, and the principal programmer of Mark I, Richard Bloch. Henry Tropp describes Aiken's hostility to the exclusive use of binary numbers in computational systems and his alternative approach.Part II contains essays on Aiken's administrative and teaching styles by former students Frederick Brooks and Peter Calingaert and an essay by Gregory Welch on the difficulties Aiken faced in establishing a computer science program at Harvard. Part III contains recollections by people who worked or studied with Aiken, including Richard Bloch, Grace Hopper, Anthony Oettinger, and Maurice Wilkes. Henry Tropp provides excerpts from an interview conducted just before Aiken's death. Part IV gathers the most significant of Aiken's own writings. The appendixes give the specs of Aiken's machines and list his doctoral students and the topics of their dissertations.


Compare

This collection of technical essays and reminiscences is a companion volume to I. Bernard Cohen's biography, Howard Aiken: Portrait of a Computer Pioneer. After an overview by Cohen, Part I presents the first complete publication of Aiken's 1937 proposal for an automatic calculating machine, which was later realized as the Mark I, as well as recollections of Aiken's first This collection of technical essays and reminiscences is a companion volume to I. Bernard Cohen's biography, Howard Aiken: Portrait of a Computer Pioneer. After an overview by Cohen, Part I presents the first complete publication of Aiken's 1937 proposal for an automatic calculating machine, which was later realized as the Mark I, as well as recollections of Aiken's first two machines by the chief engineer in charge of construction of Mark II, Robert Campbell, and the principal programmer of Mark I, Richard Bloch. Henry Tropp describes Aiken's hostility to the exclusive use of binary numbers in computational systems and his alternative approach.Part II contains essays on Aiken's administrative and teaching styles by former students Frederick Brooks and Peter Calingaert and an essay by Gregory Welch on the difficulties Aiken faced in establishing a computer science program at Harvard. Part III contains recollections by people who worked or studied with Aiken, including Richard Bloch, Grace Hopper, Anthony Oettinger, and Maurice Wilkes. Henry Tropp provides excerpts from an interview conducted just before Aiken's death. Part IV gathers the most significant of Aiken's own writings. The appendixes give the specs of Aiken's machines and list his doctoral students and the topics of their dissertations.

30 review for Makin' Numbers: Howard Aiken and the Computer

  1. 5 out of 5

    Wesley Koonce

    The book is really good so far. There are some equations that deal with math and technology. I'd really recommend it. The book is really good so far. There are some equations that deal with math and technology. I'd really recommend it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alain van Hoof

    The book starts nice with math and early computing and has great pictures of the Mark I, II, III and IV. The end was to much about how wonderful H. Aiken is, to my linking.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Azzaz

  4. 5 out of 5

    Subhajit Das

  5. 4 out of 5

    Earnest Worthing

  6. 5 out of 5

    Clam-qwerty

  7. 5 out of 5

    William Blair

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  9. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Jones

  10. 5 out of 5

    Saarthak Tomar

  11. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  12. 5 out of 5

    Deep Beep

  13. 4 out of 5

    James

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ken Voskuil

  15. 4 out of 5

    Telamonides

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dave Cheney

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carla Cornelius

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dmitry

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tahsin

  20. 5 out of 5

    James

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joe Whinnett

  22. 4 out of 5

    PKN

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael Scott

  24. 5 out of 5

    Robin Banken Torp

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mitch Troop

  26. 4 out of 5

    Steven Chang

  27. 4 out of 5

    Osten

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  29. 4 out of 5

    Claudio

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gediā¯¨

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...