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Where Demented Wented: The Art and Comics of Rory Hayes

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The controversial cartoonist Rory Hayes was a self-taught dynamo of the San Francisco underground comics revolution. Attracting equal parts derision and praise (the latter from the likes of R. Crumb and Bill Griffith), Hayes emerged as comics' great primitive, drawing horror comics in a genuinely horrifying and halucinatory manner. He has influenced a generation of cartoon The controversial cartoonist Rory Hayes was a self-taught dynamo of the San Francisco underground comics revolution. Attracting equal parts derision and praise (the latter from the likes of R. Crumb and Bill Griffith), Hayes emerged as comics' great primitive, drawing horror comics in a genuinely horrifying and halucinatory manner. He has influenced a generation of cartoonists, from RAW to Fort Thunder and back again. This book, the first retrospective of Hayes' career ever published, features the best of his underground comics output alongside paintings, covers, and artifacts rarely seen by human eyes-as well as astounding, previously unprinted comics from his teenage years and movie posters for his numerous homemade films. The Comics and Art of Rory Hayes also serves as a biography and critique with a memoir of growing up with Rory by his brother, the illustrator Geoffrey Hayes, and a career-spanning essay by Edward Pouncey. Also included is a rare interview with Hayes himself. "Rory Hayes was the real thing; a genuine 'outsider' artist working alongside his more self-aware compatriots in the heady days of the San Francisco Underground Comix scene of the 1960s and '70s. His work retains its raw, primitive power to this day, teetering precariously between chaos and control, madness and oddly endearing teddy bears."-Bill Griffith


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The controversial cartoonist Rory Hayes was a self-taught dynamo of the San Francisco underground comics revolution. Attracting equal parts derision and praise (the latter from the likes of R. Crumb and Bill Griffith), Hayes emerged as comics' great primitive, drawing horror comics in a genuinely horrifying and halucinatory manner. He has influenced a generation of cartoon The controversial cartoonist Rory Hayes was a self-taught dynamo of the San Francisco underground comics revolution. Attracting equal parts derision and praise (the latter from the likes of R. Crumb and Bill Griffith), Hayes emerged as comics' great primitive, drawing horror comics in a genuinely horrifying and halucinatory manner. He has influenced a generation of cartoonists, from RAW to Fort Thunder and back again. This book, the first retrospective of Hayes' career ever published, features the best of his underground comics output alongside paintings, covers, and artifacts rarely seen by human eyes-as well as astounding, previously unprinted comics from his teenage years and movie posters for his numerous homemade films. The Comics and Art of Rory Hayes also serves as a biography and critique with a memoir of growing up with Rory by his brother, the illustrator Geoffrey Hayes, and a career-spanning essay by Edward Pouncey. Also included is a rare interview with Hayes himself. "Rory Hayes was the real thing; a genuine 'outsider' artist working alongside his more self-aware compatriots in the heady days of the San Francisco Underground Comix scene of the 1960s and '70s. His work retains its raw, primitive power to this day, teetering precariously between chaos and control, madness and oddly endearing teddy bears."-Bill Griffith

30 review for Where Demented Wented: The Art and Comics of Rory Hayes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dominick

    Compact collection of Hayes's work, including Bill Griffiths's story on him and a biographical essay by his brother. not just published comics but also art and samples of his unpublished juvenalia. Hayes was one of the more . . . uninhibited, shall we say, of the comix crowd, and that shows especially in his extreme and disturbing material from Cunt Comix, collected here (I think) in its entire dubious glory. Hayes's work is primitive, almost amateurish-looking; from a purely formal perspective, Compact collection of Hayes's work, including Bill Griffiths's story on him and a biographical essay by his brother. not just published comics but also art and samples of his unpublished juvenalia. Hayes was one of the more . . . uninhibited, shall we say, of the comix crowd, and that shows especially in his extreme and disturbing material from Cunt Comix, collected here (I think) in its entire dubious glory. Hayes's work is primitive, almost amateurish-looking; from a purely formal perspective, there's not a lot to admire here. What gives it power is that it pretty clearly comes form an unfiltered mind and imagination, putting whatever the id throws out down on paper. Well, mostly, anyways; at times, he seems to be going for shock or grossness just because he can. Mostly, though, this is just unbridled demon-exorcising, one suspects. His conceit of using a teddy bear character in his graphic parodies/homages to EC horror books adds an element of originality, as well. Definitely not for everybody, but if you have a high tolerance for transgressive sexual and violent imagery, and especially if you are interested in underground comix, this is a book you should check out.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nada

    Brilliant. Psychotic. Psychedelic.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mark Connery

    I don't know that a rational argument can be made about the value of Hayes's work. I find it deeply moving and beautiful. I don't know that a rational argument can be made about the value of Hayes's work. I find it deeply moving and beautiful.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shawn M.

    Fucked up but cool?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gene

    The other folks who reviewed this summed the whole thing pretty well, still I am diving a little more into details in the review hereby... I wasn't quite attracted by the idea of cute teddy bears involved in trivial horror stories, but the art brut girth of the samples that I had viewed had a strong impact on me. Hayes' rather pointless or rudimentary characters are somehow related to the comical cacophony in Newgarden's Meet The Cast series or Williams' instant creations, they are mere episodes The other folks who reviewed this summed the whole thing pretty well, still I am diving a little more into details in the review hereby... I wasn't quite attracted by the idea of cute teddy bears involved in trivial horror stories, but the art brut girth of the samples that I had viewed had a strong impact on me. Hayes' rather pointless or rudimentary characters are somehow related to the comical cacophony in Newgarden's Meet The Cast series or Williams' instant creations, they are mere episodes generated by a drug-slashed mastermind fed with old comics. His scenery is fine for me, by no means professional - that doesn't mean that massive doses of black and chaotic scrabblings depicting zombies can't be fun. The more questionable material includes the C**t Comics and some other incredibly sordid sexual material (a collaboration with Spain Rodriguez) that simply doesn't hit the right spot. Overall, if it comes to depravation or hallucinations, I would recommend either Nemoto's Monster Men (more depraved, but nonetheless much funnier and corrosive), either S Clay Wilson's Checkered Demon comics (those are a must for a comic fan, anyway) instead of this. Not devoid of historical value, but there can be much better deals.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Comics/graphics aren't really my favorite genre, so while Hayes's talent is obvious to me and I find his imagery powerful, his lack of narrative sense and the extreme sexual explicitness of some of the comics turned me off. The text pieces that bookend the collection are very beautiful, though, and help me put his art in context (even though Hayes was adamant that it just be experienced). Comics/graphics aren't really my favorite genre, so while Hayes's talent is obvious to me and I find his imagery powerful, his lack of narrative sense and the extreme sexual explicitness of some of the comics turned me off. The text pieces that bookend the collection are very beautiful, though, and help me put his art in context (even though Hayes was adamant that it just be experienced).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bill Hsu

    I really love the cover of Bogeyman #1: Can't say the rest of Hayes' work does much for me though... I really love the cover of Bogeyman #1: Can't say the rest of Hayes' work does much for me though...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mark Desrosiers

    Rory Hayes wasn't the best writer in the world, and his untrained drawing style looks like the sort of thing that Ed Gein would have doodled on the back of his Trapper Keeper. In other words: just nasty and completely nuts, but also hilarious. Rory Hayes wasn't the best writer in the world, and his untrained drawing style looks like the sort of thing that Ed Gein would have doodled on the back of his Trapper Keeper. In other words: just nasty and completely nuts, but also hilarious.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shanna

    So good.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    WTF. Seriously.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Furu

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tom Alexander

  13. 5 out of 5

    n

  14. 5 out of 5

    Derek

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel

  16. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  17. 4 out of 5

    Monty

    yep, demented - fevered crazed horror and sexual fantasies - bloody strange stuff!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mattie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  20. 5 out of 5

    Desktop Metaphor

  21. 5 out of 5

    Space Bunny

  22. 4 out of 5

    Luca Dipierro

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pedro Arizpe

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bbbbbbbbbbb

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sungam

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pedro RĂ©quio

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