Hot Best Seller

Men and Women in the Church: Building Consensus on Christian Leadership

Availability: Ready to download

Evangelicals stand divided in their view of women in the church. On one side stand complementarians, arguing the full worth of women but assigning them to differing roles. On the other side stand egalitarians, arguing that the full worth of women demands their equal treatment and access to leadership roles. Is there a way to mend the breach and build consensus? Sarah Sumne Evangelicals stand divided in their view of women in the church. On one side stand complementarians, arguing the full worth of women but assigning them to differing roles. On the other side stand egalitarians, arguing that the full worth of women demands their equal treatment and access to leadership roles. Is there a way to mend the breach and build consensus? Sarah Sumner thinks there is. Avoiding the pitfalls of both radical feminism and reactionary conservatism, she traces a new path through the issues--biblical, theological, psychological and practical--to establish and affirm common ground. Arguing that men and women are both equal and distinct, Sumner encourages us to find ways to honor and benefit from the leadership gifts of both. Men and Women in the Church is a book for all who want a fresh and hope-filled look at a persistent problem.


Compare

Evangelicals stand divided in their view of women in the church. On one side stand complementarians, arguing the full worth of women but assigning them to differing roles. On the other side stand egalitarians, arguing that the full worth of women demands their equal treatment and access to leadership roles. Is there a way to mend the breach and build consensus? Sarah Sumne Evangelicals stand divided in their view of women in the church. On one side stand complementarians, arguing the full worth of women but assigning them to differing roles. On the other side stand egalitarians, arguing that the full worth of women demands their equal treatment and access to leadership roles. Is there a way to mend the breach and build consensus? Sarah Sumner thinks there is. Avoiding the pitfalls of both radical feminism and reactionary conservatism, she traces a new path through the issues--biblical, theological, psychological and practical--to establish and affirm common ground. Arguing that men and women are both equal and distinct, Sumner encourages us to find ways to honor and benefit from the leadership gifts of both. Men and Women in the Church is a book for all who want a fresh and hope-filled look at a persistent problem.

30 review for Men and Women in the Church: Building Consensus on Christian Leadership

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    An important read for all Christians regarding women. An academic and heady book originally stemming from her dissertation, it took me three years to digest the analyses in the tiny printed, meaty pages. Solely interpreting Scripture as a basis for addressing contemporary issues about women in their marriages and in church leadership, Sumner humbly and compassionately analyzes both sides of the conplementarian/egalitarian issue and seeks to build consensus among all.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Daniela Torrentera

    What a mind blowing book!!! Her research, resources, way of exposing the Scriptures are just outstanding. Her conclusion brought me hope!! No controversial attempts, just fact!! Hope you are blessed as I was. For me, a start for healing!!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Kelly

    As a graduate student of theology, I was well disappointed with this book. The author paraded her education and experience, but the book reads like something written for mass appeal. While I applaud the author for attempting to tackle a difficult issue, the argument and rhetoric of this work make it a piece of propaganda rather than theology. The author never comes to a solid definition of what leadership in the church is. Her historical and traditional examples are hand-selected and few meant t As a graduate student of theology, I was well disappointed with this book. The author paraded her education and experience, but the book reads like something written for mass appeal. While I applaud the author for attempting to tackle a difficult issue, the argument and rhetoric of this work make it a piece of propaganda rather than theology. The author never comes to a solid definition of what leadership in the church is. Her historical and traditional examples are hand-selected and few meant to evoke emotive responses from her sympathetic readers. When the author disagrees with modern complimentarians she scantly interacts with their work. She makes blind assertions and conjectures without evidence nearly every other page. She provides little biblical evidence for her views but an abundance of anecdotal information meant to adulate those who are sympathetic to her view. Egalitarians will love this book as it attacks complimentarians without any real force of scholarship. The book is full of straw man arguments, anecdotes, and unclear direction. This is a piece of rhetoric and not theology. I do not recommend and think it is more dangerous for the Church rather than helpful.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joy Kaplan

    Beyond excellent book! I felt as if she took all of the ideas out of my own head and put them on paper! If you ever want to know what I think about the issues of women in the church - here you go!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    Excellent book. Very very balanced and well-written. I found it very freeing. A breath of fresh air.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Josiah

    While I didn't agree with Sumner in the biggest points she was making in this book (she doesn't align with the theological confessions I hold to and I didn't find her arguments against those terribly compelling), she makes a well argued case for a quasi-egalitarian position for the most part and she did persuade me on a number of minor points as well. I really appreciated her approach to exegesis that is much more literary than simple proof-texting, and found that the approach often led to uniqu While I didn't agree with Sumner in the biggest points she was making in this book (she doesn't align with the theological confessions I hold to and I didn't find her arguments against those terribly compelling), she makes a well argued case for a quasi-egalitarian position for the most part and she did persuade me on a number of minor points as well. I really appreciated her approach to exegesis that is much more literary than simple proof-texting, and found that the approach often led to unique insights concerning the different texts she approached. My biggest critique of the book would be its historical analysis and arguments since Sumner's argument that church tradition teaches the natural inferiority of women was... really sparse. To be clear: I have not done extensive research on this aspect of church tradition myself. But Sumner only really cited three or four theologians over the past 2,000 years and you can't make sweeping statements on church tradition on the basis of three to four individuals (no matter how noteworthy they were). Aside from that, while I certainly disagreed with different arguments she made at different points, I appreciated hearing her perspective and she's a pretty fair rhetorician for the most part. Given how often complementarian authors have a tendency to unfairly demonize the egalitarian position, it was particularly refreshing to hear their actual arguments, and I'd recommend that more complementarians read people like Sumner if they want to better understand the "other side" and grapple honestly with their points. Rating: 3.5-4 Stars (Good).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    As always, I don't agree with everything in this book. What I love: though the author is academic (PhD and a college professor), this book is written more in a personal narrative style describing her own journey on this issue. It grapples with the biblical issues, and the author is deeply committed to the Bible, but it also resonates practically and emotionally. There were important questions I thought she didn't address, and there were some points I wish she had been more clear, but ultimately As always, I don't agree with everything in this book. What I love: though the author is academic (PhD and a college professor), this book is written more in a personal narrative style describing her own journey on this issue. It grapples with the biblical issues, and the author is deeply committed to the Bible, but it also resonates practically and emotionally. There were important questions I thought she didn't address, and there were some points I wish she had been more clear, but ultimately I think her Biblical exegesis and her story are a powerful contribution. My absolutely favorite part is her unpacking what the Bible means by "head" (as in, the husband is th head of his wife). This is part of the reading list both at Moody and at Dallas Theological Seminary.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melina

    So helpful in understanding some difficult topics and passages in the Bible. I appreciated her gracious way of discussing issues that can be very divisive and inflammatory. I think she does a good job of modeling how we can respect those with whom we disagree, while still holding firmly to our own convictions. My only complaint is that there wasn't more! I wanted to read her thoughts/analysis on more passages! So helpful in understanding some difficult topics and passages in the Bible. I appreciated her gracious way of discussing issues that can be very divisive and inflammatory. I think she does a good job of modeling how we can respect those with whom we disagree, while still holding firmly to our own convictions. My only complaint is that there wasn't more! I wanted to read her thoughts/analysis on more passages!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rosetta Mandisa

    I read this book as part of a theology class that I am taking. I was looking forward to reading this book but unfortunately that excitement went away within the first 20 pages. I simply could not gather why a woman with a PhD would refer to students with disabilities as "retarded children." Although I did finish the book and I learned a few things about the challenges women face becoming leaders in the church. I read this book as part of a theology class that I am taking. I was looking forward to reading this book but unfortunately that excitement went away within the first 20 pages. I simply could not gather why a woman with a PhD would refer to students with disabilities as "retarded children." Although I did finish the book and I learned a few things about the challenges women face becoming leaders in the church.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Wood

    “Christians don’t have to be feminists in order to believe in social justice. Feminism is not something that must be added to Christianity in order for the church to honor women. The gospel itself is pro-women.” So argues Sarah Sumner in her thoughtful, humble, and deeply personal book Men and Women in the Church. With gentle questions and painstaking logic, she explores the identity of women and men as biblically defined, refusing to adhere simplistically to either side of the “complementarian “Christians don’t have to be feminists in order to believe in social justice. Feminism is not something that must be added to Christianity in order for the church to honor women. The gospel itself is pro-women.” So argues Sarah Sumner in her thoughtful, humble, and deeply personal book Men and Women in the Church. With gentle questions and painstaking logic, she explores the identity of women and men as biblically defined, refusing to adhere simplistically to either side of the “complementarian vs. egalitarian” debate. As I read, I harbored a growing irritation that surprised me. I felt betrayed by my own tradition in a new and unsettling way. Early in the book, Sarah quotes many church fathers who shamelessly belittled women’s usefulness and dignity. While they did this with good intentions, and probably honored women more than the world in which they were writing did, I am still startled at some of their statements. Augustine writes that “not the woman but the man is the image of God,” and that while a man on his own may be the image of God, a woman cannot be the image of God, unless she is joined to her husband. Tertullian writes these harsh words to his sisters: “And do you not know that you are an Eve?... You are the devil’s gateway: you are the unsealer of that tree: you are the first deserter of the divine law: you are she who persuaded him whom the devil was not valiant enough to attack… On account of your desert—that is, death—even the Son of God had to die.” Sumner also writes that Aquinas had little context to see women as useful; he even says that a “father should be loved more than the mother… the father is principle in a more excellent way than the mother, because he is the active principle, while the mother is a passive and material principle.” Yikes! These patristic quotes all sound preposterous to me as a modern, educated woman. As an Anglican who sits under the preaching of a woman every month or two, along with the teaching of women at Moody Bible Institute, these thoughts of women’s uselessness to the church body or ontological inferiority are ridiculous to me. But the way their practical implications have shaped my upbringing and self-image is hard to ignore. The idea that a woman’s place is the home—and that her highest calling is to be a beautiful wife, nurturing mother and cheerful housekeeper—is not foreign to me. In response to all this, Sarah adamantly urges her readers not to “absorb [the church fathers’] bias,” and to recognize that traditional teaching and biblical teaching are not always synonymous. Sarah compares the traditional view of women (that which has prevailed through much of history, within and outside the church) with complementarianism; the first suggests that “women as inferiors [in relation to men] should always assume subordinate roles,” while the second claims that “women as equals [to men] should always assume subordinate roles.” It is this second mindset that has been more toxic in my upbringing. Especially in high school, I eagerly devoured literature on the topic of women’s roles as wife and mother, and I eagerly embraced complementarian ideals—despite the reality that even within my home, my mother took roles of leadership and authority that I often considered inappropriate. I believe now that the reason I did this was partially from desire to follow as closely as possible God’s ideal. But I also desired that I would be the kind of woman that a strong, dominant man would be happy to invite into his mission. Looking into muddled visions of the future, I saw no role for myself beyond that which would be given to me as I attached myself to a man. He would do the dreaming, I would do the helping, and smart, cute kids would follow. While it has been enlivening to read Sarah’s book (and learn what women are not only capable of or permitted to do, but actually gifted, called, and designed to do), I find myself more often frightened and overwhelmed than empowered. It’s one thing to be a strong-willed, “driven” woman finding a hole in the fence; it’s another thing to feel intimidated by my call, paralyzed by my freedom, inundated with options, while also feeling the discrepancy between the world open to me and the limited roles modeled for me as a child and adolescent. The book has many strengths. I appreciated how logically Sarah laid out her argument; she included many personal stories and emotional elements that strengthened her argument, but avoided manipulating readers. Logic and submission to Scripture are the guiding principles in this book. One weakness of the book is the length spent on certain arguments. I appreciated Sarah’s conversation on the meaning of headship, but I think she dragged out her argument (over 50 pages of the book) longer than necessary. Near the end of the book, Sarah asks “Do I now have the right to serve as a teaching pastor in my church?” Her answer is, of course, “no.” Neither do men have a “right” to serve as pastors! This is a sacred calling and a humble service. The freedom to use our gifts should never be a power tool to validate ourselves, but a means to serve Christ and the body. Sarah affirms towards the end of the book that “none of us have to prove who we are in order to be who we are. You are who you are no matter what.”

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Weak argumentation. Numerous assumptions and conjectures. Novel and strange definitions and concepts. Another failed attempt to map out a third wave between complementarianism and egalitarianism. Sumner is a narrow complementarianism that comes off as desperately redefining the concepts to get around Gods revealed boundaries.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Natalee

    Sometimes reads like an academic trying a little too hard to be accessible. Raises great questions, and doesn't answer them all, which I find frustrating, but which she readily admits up front. Still important conversation starters, and some really interesting exegesis. Sometimes reads like an academic trying a little too hard to be accessible. Raises great questions, and doesn't answer them all, which I find frustrating, but which she readily admits up front. Still important conversation starters, and some really interesting exegesis.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jason Walsman

    This book does not provide many satisfying answers to some difficult questions of exegesis. But Dr. Sarah Sumner does an excellent job dismantling many myths about what the Bible says about women that I had unthinkingly accepted or at least not consciously rejected.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Karen Soole

    A helpful and thoughtful contribution to an important discussion.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Joy

    Everyone truly should read this book. It changed my whole perspective.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joy Matteson

    Confession: within the first 4 chapters, I had come so close to throwing this book across the room. Although I am glad I finished it,I can't say I can recommend it. Dr. Sarah Sumner, professor of systematic theology, graduated from Trinity, felt that God was calling her to write about men and women in the church, advocating for a third way beyond complementarianism (I.e., the belief that men and women are separate but that women are to submit to men) and egalitarianism (I.e, the belief that men Confession: within the first 4 chapters, I had come so close to throwing this book across the room. Although I am glad I finished it,I can't say I can recommend it. Dr. Sarah Sumner, professor of systematic theology, graduated from Trinity, felt that God was calling her to write about men and women in the church, advocating for a third way beyond complementarianism (I.e., the belief that men and women are separate but that women are to submit to men) and egalitarianism (I.e, the belief that men and women are separate but equal in gifting, and both submit to God). Her third way criticizes both egalitarians as "radical or biblical feminists" or, "women's libber" but also doesn't let specific kinds of complementarity like Wayne Grudem or John Piper get away with everything they espouse to in their Biblical Manhood and Womanhood book. For the first half of the book, she admitted she didn't understand why so many Christian women felt like men were limiting them in the church. But God was showing her differently, which was helping her understand why women felt undermined. It could be because she felt herself to be the exception, a "Priscilla" to preach to men, since Dr. Carl F.H. Henry himself told her it was okay! Oh lord. On the plus side, no one can accuse Dr. Sumner of plagiarism; all footnotes are copiously spelled out, with great emphasis. I just did not see her advocating a third way- her book seemed to be soft complementarianism, where she is allowing women to preach to men (more or less as exceptions), but men are still the heads of their wives. It was interesting that his book came out in 2003, over ten years ago. So much has changed, there is such a thing as Jesus feminism with Sarah Bessey's book in 2013. Dr. Sumner admittedly takes the time to spell out she is definitely NOT a feminist. She also makes almost no mention of damaging Christian patriarchy under the name "complementarianism" nor hardly any examples of where Christian singles, gays, lesbians, or transsexuals would fit into her schema. But who knows where she would stand today? In any case, I cannot recommend.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Adam Omelianchuk

    Sarah Sumner writes with passion and grace as she pleas for a middle road between complementarian and egalitarian gender ideas in the evangelical church. Interspersed with many personal anecdotes, Sumner thinks the likes of Wayne Grudem and Rebecca Merrill Groothuis have it all wrong, and that in a conversation where no one is listening to one another, a lot of the what the Bible is saying is being ignored. While I am not sure what to think of her mysterion interpretation of "headship" or her re Sarah Sumner writes with passion and grace as she pleas for a middle road between complementarian and egalitarian gender ideas in the evangelical church. Interspersed with many personal anecdotes, Sumner thinks the likes of Wayne Grudem and Rebecca Merrill Groothuis have it all wrong, and that in a conversation where no one is listening to one another, a lot of the what the Bible is saying is being ignored. While I am not sure what to think of her mysterion interpretation of "headship" or her representation of certain egalitarians like Groothuis, I think there is plenty of good material here to think about, especially in the discussion questions at the end of each chapter. In the end, I am not convinced she has made any progress in "building consensus on Christian leadership" with respect to the gender question. It seems to me that Sumner is a disgruntled egalitarian of sorts--someone who is not happy with how egalitarians have represented themselves, but could never sign on to the idea of complementarianism. Many of her critiques are one-sided, blasting the ideas as articulated by Piper and Grudem.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    THIS is the book I have been looking for! It feels like she is speaking directly to me, and it makes me want to cry. It's like "Lean In" for evangelical Christians. It is gentle, knowledgeable, personal, biblical, insightful, revelatory, etc. I just bought 3 more copies for friends, and I'm only half-way through. What a relief; now I don't have to write this book! ;) (not that I could have done it this well anyway) Above was my review on first finding this book and reading about 1/2. I gradually THIS is the book I have been looking for! It feels like she is speaking directly to me, and it makes me want to cry. It's like "Lean In" for evangelical Christians. It is gentle, knowledgeable, personal, biblical, insightful, revelatory, etc. I just bought 3 more copies for friends, and I'm only half-way through. What a relief; now I don't have to write this book! ;) (not that I could have done it this well anyway) Above was my review on first finding this book and reading about 1/2. I gradually lost steam as it is a bit long and dense. Maybe I still need to write a book that's short, to the point, and easier. Phewy. One note: The author mentions that one of her mentors encouraged her to include stories about her personal journey in the book. I think this was a mistake. On such a contentious subject, I think people respect a thorough case more if it's not diluted by personal stories that can make it feel more biased.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joel Wentz

    As of now, this is the absolute best book I have read on this topic. Somehow, Sumner manages to cut through the typical arguments on both sides of the debate, and deftly gets to the heart of what is at stake here. Her treatment of 'classic' texts (the "weaker vessel"; 1 Timothy 2, Ephesians 5 and headship) is refreshing and convincing, even as she operates within a fairly conservative paradigm of scriptural interpretation. Sumner is ruthlessly committed to first-rate scholarship and intellectual As of now, this is the absolute best book I have read on this topic. Somehow, Sumner manages to cut through the typical arguments on both sides of the debate, and deftly gets to the heart of what is at stake here. Her treatment of 'classic' texts (the "weaker vessel"; 1 Timothy 2, Ephesians 5 and headship) is refreshing and convincing, even as she operates within a fairly conservative paradigm of scriptural interpretation. Sumner is ruthlessly committed to first-rate scholarship and intellectual honesty throughout, and I personally found her contention that the debate is indicative of the historical Scotist-Thomist divide in the church extremely helpful. It has given me new language to bring to this conversation, and I am remarkably thankful for her contribution to the topic in the form of this book. For anyone who is working through this topic in the local church, I cannot recommend this one highly enough!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Dr. Sumner somewhat objectively explained the 2 major different interpretations of biblical passages that pertain to men and women in the church (see Gen. 1-3, Eph. 5, 1 Cor. 11, 1 Tim. 2-3, among others). She also described how the church historically viewed women. Though I don't completely follow her conclusion that women have biblical allowance to hold pastoral roles (if called), Dr. Sumner does handle scripture humbly and with great care. I suggest this book for any seeking an extensive look Dr. Sumner somewhat objectively explained the 2 major different interpretations of biblical passages that pertain to men and women in the church (see Gen. 1-3, Eph. 5, 1 Cor. 11, 1 Tim. 2-3, among others). She also described how the church historically viewed women. Though I don't completely follow her conclusion that women have biblical allowance to hold pastoral roles (if called), Dr. Sumner does handle scripture humbly and with great care. I suggest this book for any seeking an extensive look at the related texts. She has fair criticisms of both evangelical feminists and evangelical complementarians; this is not a call to forget scripture, but to study it more. I grew though Dr. Sumner's thoughtful arguments, and I'm inspired to read scripture more - not a bad result. (Plus, Dallas WIllard put his name on the front; that's saying something).

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kensie

    Life changing. Biblical. Easy to read. Sarah does a great job address questions about both the Egalitarian and Complementarian views. She breaks each thought down for the reader step by step, so it is not confusion to follow at all. I felt refreshed and freed and thoughtful the entire time I read this book. I could hardly put it down!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Krisula

    Dr. Sumner is a conservative, Christian theologian, head of department at a conservative Christian college(Azusa Pacific University) who happens to be a woman. She addresses scriptures pertaining to Christian leadership and applies them to families and the church. Her common sense interpretation is clear, obvious, and never before addressed to my knowlege. If widely read, I believe this little book could set the church on its head (in a good way). Unfortunately, i fear, it will slip into obscurit Dr. Sumner is a conservative, Christian theologian, head of department at a conservative Christian college(Azusa Pacific University) who happens to be a woman. She addresses scriptures pertaining to Christian leadership and applies them to families and the church. Her common sense interpretation is clear, obvious, and never before addressed to my knowlege. If widely read, I believe this little book could set the church on its head (in a good way). Unfortunately, i fear, it will slip into obscurity. I hope I am wrong. The insight here is important to both men and women of faith in all denominations of Christ followers.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    This is one of the two most thoughtful and persuasive books I've read (along with Slaves, Women, and Homosexuals by Webb) on the issues surrounding the role of women in ministry. Sumner is an ideal writer to speak to both sides of this debate. She is an egalatarian, but openly disagrees with some of the common interpretations and conclusions. Her exegesis is very thoughtful, and the autobiographical way in which she writes is very compelling. Especially noteworthy is her take on 1 Timothy 2, and This is one of the two most thoughtful and persuasive books I've read (along with Slaves, Women, and Homosexuals by Webb) on the issues surrounding the role of women in ministry. Sumner is an ideal writer to speak to both sides of this debate. She is an egalatarian, but openly disagrees with some of the common interpretations and conclusions. Her exegesis is very thoughtful, and the autobiographical way in which she writes is very compelling. Especially noteworthy is her take on 1 Timothy 2, and on "headship" as a picture rather than as a definition. This is a very honest wrestling with the issues. Highly recommended!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chauncey Lattimer

    There is no better way to experience the struggle of a gifted female leader than to take this journey with Sarah Sumner. Thank you, Sarah, for calling us forward beyond the complementarian and egalitarian debates! Thank you for once again, reframing the questions to get beyond the 'presenting' situations and verses. I also found Dr. Sumner to be very accessible for personal questions, which was a delight. This is a must read for anybody searching to understand God's will in what has become a tro There is no better way to experience the struggle of a gifted female leader than to take this journey with Sarah Sumner. Thank you, Sarah, for calling us forward beyond the complementarian and egalitarian debates! Thank you for once again, reframing the questions to get beyond the 'presenting' situations and verses. I also found Dr. Sumner to be very accessible for personal questions, which was a delight. This is a must read for anybody searching to understand God's will in what has become a troublesome battlefield. This is a must read for anybody willing to admit that they don't know all the answers.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tim Sheppard

    My wife had me read this book after she read it. I would say she is an egalitarian. I am still a complementarian, but Sarah is a good writer and makes a good case. I am a male who grew up as a PK, so I have bias for sure, but I think there is something to the order of Male/Female. We are equal, but in order to show God's grand design and nature, we are to fulfill different roles in all of our lives. The jury is still out, but this is where I stand for now. My wife and I get along fine, by the wa My wife had me read this book after she read it. I would say she is an egalitarian. I am still a complementarian, but Sarah is a good writer and makes a good case. I am a male who grew up as a PK, so I have bias for sure, but I think there is something to the order of Male/Female. We are equal, but in order to show God's grand design and nature, we are to fulfill different roles in all of our lives. The jury is still out, but this is where I stand for now. My wife and I get along fine, by the way.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anna Josephine

    Literally the best book I have ever read on gender. I highly, highly recommend it. So well-reasoned and thoughtful and impassioned and balanced. The author manages to speak to all sides of the debate in a liberating and convicting way. Some good questions I encountered in this book: - how have I, a woman, been sexist towards other women and even to myself? How do I deal with that? - is saying that men and women are equal "before God" a cop out? Does it free us from any obligation to work out and fi Literally the best book I have ever read on gender. I highly, highly recommend it. So well-reasoned and thoughtful and impassioned and balanced. The author manages to speak to all sides of the debate in a liberating and convicting way. Some good questions I encountered in this book: - how have I, a woman, been sexist towards other women and even to myself? How do I deal with that? - is saying that men and women are equal "before God" a cop out? Does it free us from any obligation to work out and fight for that equality in everyday life and relationships?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

    I can't say enough about this book. I just can't. It's freaking amazing, biblically based, and isn't angry. Mrs. Sumner is speaking to both sides of this debate with respect and has something new to say for everyone. Read this book prayerfully, with an open heart and mind. Conservatives, DO NOT BE AFRAID OF THIS BOOK. It's not written by a "crazy liberal feminist" wanting to take over the world. Everyone in the church needs to read this book. I can't say enough about this book. I just can't. It's freaking amazing, biblically based, and isn't angry. Mrs. Sumner is speaking to both sides of this debate with respect and has something new to say for everyone. Read this book prayerfully, with an open heart and mind. Conservatives, DO NOT BE AFRAID OF THIS BOOK. It's not written by a "crazy liberal feminist" wanting to take over the world. Everyone in the church needs to read this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tim Gunther

    Thought provoking rethinking of the roles assigned by the church and society over time. Refocuses the conversation on understanding the implicit thinking of the church. Brings fresh insights to how biblical text ought to be considered in light of clearer understanding of what God connection to mankind and our relationship to each other and Him

  29. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I wish this book were a tiny bit better edited, but overall I found it an incredibly beautiful work. I so appreciate that she approaches the topic from a genuine desire to see everyone serving God, as opposed to treating the issue like some kind of war. I would recommend this book to pretty much anyone.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christina Moss

    I would have given this book 3.5 stars, but since that's not an option four seems fairer than three. Sumner does a good job of fairly representing the views of complementarians (and, for the most part, egalitarians, although she has some animosity toward feminism and doesn't seem to realize that it's such a wide tent that she qualifies). I would have given this book 3.5 stars, but since that's not an option four seems fairer than three. Sumner does a good job of fairly representing the views of complementarians (and, for the most part, egalitarians, although she has some animosity toward feminism and doesn't seem to realize that it's such a wide tent that she qualifies).

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...