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Women and Girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Understanding Life Experiences from Early Childhood to Old Age

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This book adds to our knowledge by providing an insightful, sensitive analysis of the pattern of behaviours in females from childhood through to old age... This book endorses my clinical experiences in working with females in the autism spectrum and validates the importance of diagnosis at any time in a person's life. Therefore I would highly recommend this book for all pr This book adds to our knowledge by providing an insightful, sensitive analysis of the pattern of behaviours in females from childhood through to old age... This book endorses my clinical experiences in working with females in the autism spectrum and validates the importance of diagnosis at any time in a person's life. Therefore I would highly recommend this book for all professionals involved in diagnosis and supporting girls and women in the autism spectrum. --from the foreword by Dr Judith Gould, Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Director of The Lorna Wing Centre for Autism.


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This book adds to our knowledge by providing an insightful, sensitive analysis of the pattern of behaviours in females from childhood through to old age... This book endorses my clinical experiences in working with females in the autism spectrum and validates the importance of diagnosis at any time in a person's life. Therefore I would highly recommend this book for all pr This book adds to our knowledge by providing an insightful, sensitive analysis of the pattern of behaviours in females from childhood through to old age... This book endorses my clinical experiences in working with females in the autism spectrum and validates the importance of diagnosis at any time in a person's life. Therefore I would highly recommend this book for all professionals involved in diagnosis and supporting girls and women in the autism spectrum. --from the foreword by Dr Judith Gould, Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Director of The Lorna Wing Centre for Autism.

30 review for Women and Girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Understanding Life Experiences from Early Childhood to Old Age

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Gantley

    This book was really disappointing. Even though it aims to represent women with autism through all phases of life, it’s basically the female version of the Sheldon Cooper autism stereotype. Most of the women included are described as “masculine” (because they don’t subscribe to patriarchal beauty standards and apparently masculinity is the default), self absorbed, cold, lacking empathy, etc. I get that that’s what the women she interviewed were like and that’s fine, I just wish she’d have made m This book was really disappointing. Even though it aims to represent women with autism through all phases of life, it’s basically the female version of the Sheldon Cooper autism stereotype. Most of the women included are described as “masculine” (because they don’t subscribe to patriarchal beauty standards and apparently masculinity is the default), self absorbed, cold, lacking empathy, etc. I get that that’s what the women she interviewed were like and that’s fine, I just wish she’d have made more of an effort to find more diverse women to talk to. The gender and sexuality chapter is really bad. She dedicates pages and pages to transgender women (who were probably diagnosed when they were children), but the section on sexuality literally includes one trans lesbian, one cis lesbian, one lesbian who thinks she wouldn’t have to be a lesbian if she had better social skills (???) and one straight woman who is disgusted by lesbians and thinks that a family needs to be made up of a mother and a father... I don’t know why the author thought it was necessary to include blatant homophobia. Overall it’s just pretty old fashioned.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Reading this book many things resonated with our experiences. The author details how ASD presents differently in girls and that the average age for diagnosis was 8. That they are happy with a group of imaginary friends rather than real life people- which is one of the things I find hardest to accept for her. So many things that our daughter experiences were discussed in this book and I found it fascinating. Clothing- ‘universally, for those responding there was a strong preference for clothing tha Reading this book many things resonated with our experiences. The author details how ASD presents differently in girls and that the average age for diagnosis was 8. That they are happy with a group of imaginary friends rather than real life people- which is one of the things I find hardest to accept for her. So many things that our daughter experiences were discussed in this book and I found it fascinating. Clothing- ‘universally, for those responding there was a strong preference for clothing that was comfortable, soft, stretchy, loose and smooth’. This explains why she only likes elasticated waists and not a buttoned waistband. Sleep is often a problem- our daughter thinks it is a waste of time and likes to see both ends of the night. Seeking adult intervention rather than with peers. She has always preferred to have a familiar adult with her than a friend the same age. I would highly recommend this book for families with a young daughter on the ASD spectrum.

  3. 5 out of 5

    H.A. Leuschel

    A fantastic overview on autism with many contributions made by girls and women with ASD.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Heather Connolly

    I have read several books on this topic now (Aspergirls, M is for Autism, Aspergers and Girls) and I think this is the best. The book covers so many scenarios faced on either a day to day basis or throughout life by women with aspergers. It also tackles misconceptions about women on the spectrum and how these are both harmful for those seeking a diagnosis and those who are already diagnosed. I feel every female on the autistic spectrum could benefit from reading this and develop their self under I have read several books on this topic now (Aspergirls, M is for Autism, Aspergers and Girls) and I think this is the best. The book covers so many scenarios faced on either a day to day basis or throughout life by women with aspergers. It also tackles misconceptions about women on the spectrum and how these are both harmful for those seeking a diagnosis and those who are already diagnosed. I feel every female on the autistic spectrum could benefit from reading this and develop their self understanding. I bought this book after watching one of Sarah Hendrickxs youtube videos about autism and anxiety. I am now hoping to read her other books as she writes and talks about autism in a way only someone who has actually experienced it can.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    A Review: Women and Girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder by Sarah Hendrickx My interest in this book is personal, having family members representing both the female and male side of Autism Spectrum Disorder, with the female members having had a harder time getting a diagnosis – so I jumped at reading and reviewing ‘Women and Girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder’ thirsty for information on the subject. In our case, one adult female in her 60’s remains without a formal diagnosis, and two teenage niec A Review: Women and Girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder by Sarah Hendrickx My interest in this book is personal, having family members representing both the female and male side of Autism Spectrum Disorder, with the female members having had a harder time getting a diagnosis – so I jumped at reading and reviewing ‘Women and Girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder’ thirsty for information on the subject. In our case, one adult female in her 60’s remains without a formal diagnosis, and two teenage nieces, aged 13 and 15 respectively are currently going through the diagnostic process (with one recent formal diagnosis) much later in life than my own son who was diagnosed aged 10. This has meant that my son was supported through the transition to secondary school, whereas the females have had none. The subsequent effort of ‘struggling on’ without help will inevitably have a huge impact on their later lives as adults, although of course we cannot measure it. ‘Women and Girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder’ is an intelligently written and very informative book, well-researched and full of facts and figures reflecting on the manifestations of ASD in male and female subjects, and the need for varying diagnostic criteria based on the differences between them. I found this book very interesting, but it was quite heavy going, particularly bearing in mind the number of references to other works; a necessary requirement for a research based piece of writing requiring supporting information. Although only around 248 pages, the ‘layperson’ would possibly not sustain attention for the duration of the book, with the reading audience likely consisting of students, academics, and professionals working in this specific field . Overall I applaud the author’s commitment to the subject; ASD is widely misunderstood in the Neurotypical world, even by mainstream school teachers, GPs and surgeries who may be the first approached in seeking an assessment, and who should therefore have a working knowledge of the condition in their everyday employment. To acknowledge further that what may diagnose ASD in a male, may not be the same as the deciding diagnostic factors in a female can only help towards further provision of the necessary support and care of more people with this condition, particularly from youth. I give this book 3 stars out of 5.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I read this book as I have been interested in reading it for a while. I heard Hendrickx deliver a lecture for my course on Autism in September 2015 and she was an inspiring and interesting person. I am now planning an assignment and research project about women with autism in a College environment so reading this book seemed to be a great place to start. I enjoyed the fact that the book was interspersed with Hendrickx's own experiences as a woman with autism and the direct words of others involv I read this book as I have been interested in reading it for a while. I heard Hendrickx deliver a lecture for my course on Autism in September 2015 and she was an inspiring and interesting person. I am now planning an assignment and research project about women with autism in a College environment so reading this book seemed to be a great place to start. I enjoyed the fact that the book was interspersed with Hendrickx's own experiences as a woman with autism and the direct words of others involved in her research project. This enabled a wider range of topics to be discussed such as puberty, employment and ageing and its relation to women. In quite a lot of areas the topic has not been looked at in any depth before as most research studies about autism have specifically focussed on men and some still believe that autism is only present in men and boys. The book details indicators of autism in women and the ways it differs from classic male autism. I have learned a lot from the book. I have read the book on line and it the first time I have read a whole book on the computer not a kindle or other paper version. This was due to it being available in my university on line library. I will recommend this book to all interested in autism, specifically issues surrounding women and autism and psychology.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Audra

    VITAL. Especially for neurodiverse women who have felt alone, or wondered “why am I like XYZ?” Captures the feelings of growing up autistic, both for those new to the diagnosis and for those who may know or love autistic female and non-binary individuals. So so glad I finally bought this.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Van Parys

    I enjoyed this book and read it quickly. I have suspected that I fall on the spectrum for a few years, however, getting a diagnosis is not easy at all. Plus I often fall under the umbrella of "what's the point?" - which is dealt with as well in the book as well since many women are not diagnosed until later in life because symptoms in women (surprise! *data bias*) present differently than in men. I wanted to read this book to have more insight into living with this disorder. (Filed on my "mental I enjoyed this book and read it quickly. I have suspected that I fall on the spectrum for a few years, however, getting a diagnosis is not easy at all. Plus I often fall under the umbrella of "what's the point?" - which is dealt with as well in the book as well since many women are not diagnosed until later in life because symptoms in women (surprise! *data bias*) present differently than in men. I wanted to read this book to have more insight into living with this disorder. (Filed on my "mental illness" shelf for dealing with co-morbid issues.)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Excellent overview that highlights exactly how little research there has been about women on the spectrum, particularly older women. Recommended.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Darnell

    Absolutely brilliant book. I was diagnosed about seven years ago, and as an adult it feels like you have to, in a sense, rediscover yourself in the light of the new information. This book, with all its insights into the complexities of women on the spectrum, was like a breath of fresh air. At times it felt like someone had been looking into my own life, so relevant was the experiences of others and the research and findings done about certain traits common to women and girls. I liked how the aut Absolutely brilliant book. I was diagnosed about seven years ago, and as an adult it feels like you have to, in a sense, rediscover yourself in the light of the new information. This book, with all its insights into the complexities of women on the spectrum, was like a breath of fresh air. At times it felt like someone had been looking into my own life, so relevant was the experiences of others and the research and findings done about certain traits common to women and girls. I liked how the author was open about her own experiences too, it softened the often authoritative nature of, what often can seem a very logically written book. I thought the section on pregnancy was a bit vaguer than I would have liked, but overall the book was very informative and offered some very helpful suggestions. I loved how respectful the book was, also. It doesn't do as some autism books have, and in a sense see neurotypical people as the enemy. And the final chapter is so encouraging and inspiring! It's so nice to read a book that can make you see the autism in a positive light instead of it being this huge problem we feel we somehow have to fix. I would definitely recommend this, to both autistic women and girls, and to the people who love and care for them. A definite keeper.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Having listened to several of Sarah's presentations on YouTube, I was familiar with a lot of the narrative so for me the value was in the quotes from autistic women themselves. These have really highlighted to me that the female autistic experience is quite different to the male-based clinical diagnosis criteria. Having listened to several of Sarah's presentations on YouTube, I was familiar with a lot of the narrative so for me the value was in the quotes from autistic women themselves. These have really highlighted to me that the female autistic experience is quite different to the male-based clinical diagnosis criteria.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    A brilliant book if you suspect you're autistic or have an autistic girl or woman in your life you want to understand better. A brilliant book if you suspect you're autistic or have an autistic girl or woman in your life you want to understand better.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    I am reading this as I suspect that my daughter is on the autism spectrum and possibly myself. We are both high functioning if so but from what I have read I am sure in my daughter's case and 80% sure for myself. It certainly makes sense of a lot of the problems in my life and past experiences. I have next to no ability to discern the character of others and blithely assume everyone is good and sincere. I share and am honest in my speech more than seems appropriate and cannot deal with others ly I am reading this as I suspect that my daughter is on the autism spectrum and possibly myself. We are both high functioning if so but from what I have read I am sure in my daughter's case and 80% sure for myself. It certainly makes sense of a lot of the problems in my life and past experiences. I have next to no ability to discern the character of others and blithely assume everyone is good and sincere. I share and am honest in my speech more than seems appropriate and cannot deal with others lying or betraying either myself or others. Also unfair conduct of others towards those who they have authority over causes me to rush in defense. I have lost jobs because of this and also had numerous painful relationships. My daughter gives away money and her things if someone asks for it. She is a sweetheart but I worry about her. She does other people's work and cannot communicate with others in her own defense. She is like me and I don't want her to go through life being taken advantage of and hurt as I was. We both cannot tolerate crowds or lots of noise, lights, activity. We have what is called a hypersensitive nervous system which means our brains do not filter out irrelevant stuff and we get bombarded with everything to process. For instance hair ties, tags on our clothes, make up on our face; we cannot tolerate any of this. I live a very simply solitary life but I am ok with this. I want to help my daughter to be ok too. The book has been a great start in my search. She is in her 20's and I in my 50's.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Leah Cossette

    I quit a few chapters in. I mean no disrespect to anyone who was validated by this book, but I didn't feel like I learned anything from reading it. The author would describe certain behaviors that girls with autism would experience, then go on to describe the exact opposite behavior as being also typical. In addition, some of those behaviors were, I guess what I would describe as normal for some ages (young kids crying when introduced to a new classroom or teacher, shyness with playmates, etc). I quit a few chapters in. I mean no disrespect to anyone who was validated by this book, but I didn't feel like I learned anything from reading it. The author would describe certain behaviors that girls with autism would experience, then go on to describe the exact opposite behavior as being also typical. In addition, some of those behaviors were, I guess what I would describe as normal for some ages (young kids crying when introduced to a new classroom or teacher, shyness with playmates, etc). After getting several chapters in, I still don't feel like I really have a good handle on how to identify or help girls with autism.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Wow. Just wow. Thank you, Sarah. I can finally love myself, just for being me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Evan

    Disappointing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    B. Jean

    Lovingly labelled "unique and quirky" by my parents, and diagnosed with OCD and anxiety in high school, I only wore pajamas and sweatpants from 8th grade onwards because I could not stand the texture or clinginess of jeans. I ate the same breakfast hotpocket every day for four years. I still will eat the same food for weeks. I have a strict routine where I do the same thing every day (and I mean every day) and will panic and cry if someone changes it on me. I go nonverbal in crowds, get migraine Lovingly labelled "unique and quirky" by my parents, and diagnosed with OCD and anxiety in high school, I only wore pajamas and sweatpants from 8th grade onwards because I could not stand the texture or clinginess of jeans. I ate the same breakfast hotpocket every day for four years. I still will eat the same food for weeks. I have a strict routine where I do the same thing every day (and I mean every day) and will panic and cry if someone changes it on me. I go nonverbal in crowds, get migraines from crowds, have thrown up, passed out, gotten panic attacks from being surrounded by people. I have a hard time following multiple conversations and keeping conversations going or knowing how to respond. I spend many hours going over conversational scripts. I hate eye contact and have been lectured about it ever since I was a small child sitting in the corner silently at all family reunions. (And at home for that matter, I'm big on corners and specific chairs.) I don't have a wide net of friends. I have intense special interests - cats, art, reading. I have journals filled with thousands of character names and short biographies for each written in coded language from my own fantasy world. ANYWAY, the list goes on. And I was like, ah, yeah, I'm weird and I'll never understand why. I watched a vlog a month or so ago now and there was a moment where I was like, ah. I related to everything she said. Thus I started watching vlogs and TEDtalks from women diagnosed with ASD every night, and that's how I came to this book. I saw this author's lecture on youtube and thought I'd give it a try. ...Every highlight is something I related to. It was especially helpful for me to know my mental health diagnosis in high school are common comorbidities of ASD, but it was disheartening to read how many girls are missed with diagnosis, and that up until recently it wasn't considered something girls could get at all. It's extremely hard to get a diagnosis as an adult. I'm not saying that I'm definitely ASD, but it would make a lot of sense to me and would be a great relief if I was. Either way it certainly helps to learn more about it. I will say that I did not like the LGBT section that much, and I think it would benefit from someone with a gender studies degree looking over it. I think the quotes provided were poorly chosen.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    So, an interesting read. Hendrickx combines available research with her personal experiences and the experiences of some 30 girls and women (some of them family of girls & women on the spectrum, some autistic themselves; the break-down of those numbers is not given). The people who contributed ranged in age from 4 to 62. The book starts with infancy and childhood, moving up through old age. The most research has been done in the early ages, and, obviously, as the book moves into older and older So, an interesting read. Hendrickx combines available research with her personal experiences and the experiences of some 30 girls and women (some of them family of girls & women on the spectrum, some autistic themselves; the break-down of those numbers is not given). The people who contributed ranged in age from 4 to 62. The book starts with infancy and childhood, moving up through old age. The most research has been done in the early ages, and, obviously, as the book moves into older and older age ranges, there are fewer participants. I felt this was especially bad in the parenting chapter -- of the adult autistic women surveyed, half of those were parents, and there were few research sources to draw on. Take out the number of participants who are not themselves autistic, take out the girls, divide the remaining number by two...and that's probably fewer than ten people? Perhaps far fewer. It felt more like the author and a few friends she personally found relatable talking about it with only a slight nod to ASD women who feel like competent parents and/or love parenting. The chapter on old age has a single person to draw from, but the author states as much and comments more about how research is needed there. It was still an interesting read, but I enjoyed the childhood chapters much better than the latter ones where the research and the number of people reporting this life experiences was so slim. I had to readjust my expectations after some really spectacular opening chapters.

  19. 4 out of 5

    jenna

    I loved this book. I had done researcj on autism, having been diagnosed as bipolar before, and finally sought out a psychiatrist who would listen to me about my suspicions that I may be autistic. Immediately, she actually laughed with me at the end of the session and asked “how did everyone overlook this for 19 years?” I was right, even though most of the things I had read were all from male research. After we talked for a little bit, she gave me a recommendation to read this book. Bought it imm I loved this book. I had done researcj on autism, having been diagnosed as bipolar before, and finally sought out a psychiatrist who would listen to me about my suspicions that I may be autistic. Immediately, she actually laughed with me at the end of the session and asked “how did everyone overlook this for 19 years?” I was right, even though most of the things I had read were all from male research. After we talked for a little bit, she gave me a recommendation to read this book. Bought it immediately and Im glad I did. Hendrickx talks about things most autism websites don’t; fascination with fiction, moods, suicidal ideation, self harm (TW // she mentions cutting boys names into her palm, which was close to something I had done before, and I felt so seen) etc. I highlighted and annotated like crazy because I really resonated with a lot of what Hendrickx said. I felt seen and understood and NORMAL after reading this book. The section on sexuality was a little vague and didnt feel very relative to me; the “tomboy” attitude and feeling like a male didnt really resonate, but it might for others. I also never experienced most of the symptoms in early childhood she mentions. But this book is still wonderful. Hendrickx gives recommendations for other sources too, which I love because I can read more on my diagnosis. Im buying the Holliday Willey “Pretending to Be Normal” book mentioned in the first few chapters now. Overall, I highly recommend this book for people who were diagnosed later in life or women who suspect they might have autism. It’s a really eye-opening read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany (OomilyReads)

    Hendrickx has worked exclusively for 5 years in the field of autism before being diagnosed at the age of 43! She wrote this book specifically for females on the spectrum because they can present differently than boys therefore making it difficult to diagnosis. It’s unfortunate that because many females are diagnosed later (average age is 8 but many aren’t until they are adults or never diagnosed) end up “struggling” through life because they do not understand neurotypical behavior & are often mi Hendrickx has worked exclusively for 5 years in the field of autism before being diagnosed at the age of 43! She wrote this book specifically for females on the spectrum because they can present differently than boys therefore making it difficult to diagnosis. It’s unfortunate that because many females are diagnosed later (average age is 8 but many aren’t until they are adults or never diagnosed) end up “struggling” through life because they do not understand neurotypical behavior & are often misunderstood themselves. They can mimic but it can be extremely exhausting. I can only imagine how stressful, anxiety-inducing and depressing it can be for someone with autism trying to figure out a neurotypical world. I know of elementary teachers who do not understand that their female students could have autism & instead mistake their behavior for “bad” and take it out on the child. The child ends up fearing school. This becomes increasingly difficult as they get into high school and dealing with female friendships. Navigating this world seems daunting & Hendrickx describes that many as 50% of women with autism have depression & anxiety. There were many points I took away from this book but what frightened me the most was how girls can be more easily coerced or forced into sex. They do not see the signs & may not be able to predict what a person will do at that particular moment. This is another population of female that are vulnerable. This book covers many topics starting from infancy, childhood to adulthood, school, sexuality/gender identity and risk for sexual assault, employment, personal relationships and pregnancy. I think this book would resonate with many autistic females. I would recommend to professionals & families who need insight into supporting women & girls with autism. Young girls with autism need to know they do not need to fit in with conventional “norms” in order to be valuable & have a place in this world.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jayde Marie

    This was another recommendation from my placement supervisor. I found this book really useful too; I was aware of the issues around ASC and women already but I think this book gave a really comprehensive overview of what these academic debates might actually be referring to in real life. I loved that it was written by a woman with ASC and included the voices of a diverse range of other women with ASC. I think so often in psychology 'professional' voices are privileged, and while this has it's pl This was another recommendation from my placement supervisor. I found this book really useful too; I was aware of the issues around ASC and women already but I think this book gave a really comprehensive overview of what these academic debates might actually be referring to in real life. I loved that it was written by a woman with ASC and included the voices of a diverse range of other women with ASC. I think so often in psychology 'professional' voices are privileged, and while this has it's place, I don't think anything can trump the usefulness of lived experience. (Though of course being a 'professional' and a person with ASC aren't mutually exclusive - an important caveat!) Practically, the structure of the book covering the lifespan chronologically was really helpful for someone naive like me to follow the kinds of issues you might expect to see at any given point, as well as how these could develop over time.

  22. 5 out of 5

    C Pure

    Informative as well as comforting This is a great read for anyone who has been a recently diagnosed adult or for folks in the field of psychology. After reading this book so many things resonated with me and gave me comfort that I'm not the only one experiencing some of these 'quirky traits.' What I enjoyed most about the book is the mix of personal and research-based accounts. Since there is not much research based data about women with AS it was great to read the real life experiences woman you Informative as well as comforting This is a great read for anyone who has been a recently diagnosed adult or for folks in the field of psychology. After reading this book so many things resonated with me and gave me comfort that I'm not the only one experiencing some of these 'quirky traits.' What I enjoyed most about the book is the mix of personal and research-based accounts. Since there is not much research based data about women with AS it was great to read the real life experiences woman young and old have gone through. This book is an important starting point hopefully having more understanding and compassion for getting folks accomodations and support where needed.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah "Alexis"

    Girls and women can have autism. Females with autism can behave quite differently than males with autism. The most current diagnostic assessments do not consider sex differences and only give examples of the male profile of behaviour. Women with autism hide it better and present it in a different way that slips under the radar of those looking for male signs derived from the almost exclusive male research. We learn what life is like for females living with autism. So many brave women share their Girls and women can have autism. Females with autism can behave quite differently than males with autism. The most current diagnostic assessments do not consider sex differences and only give examples of the male profile of behaviour. Women with autism hide it better and present it in a different way that slips under the radar of those looking for male signs derived from the almost exclusive male research. We learn what life is like for females living with autism. So many brave women share their stories about difficulties they have.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nightingale

    A helpful first stop for those who think that they or someone in their family may have ASD, this is an important work that highlights the ways in which ASD can manifest and often be overlooked in girls, having been characterised using boys. Hendrickx brings together the experiences of women and girls with ASD in an easy-to-read manner. It does not necessarily give all the answers for how to start to solve problems (the goal of the book seems to be a more illustrative approach) but can certainly A helpful first stop for those who think that they or someone in their family may have ASD, this is an important work that highlights the ways in which ASD can manifest and often be overlooked in girls, having been characterised using boys. Hendrickx brings together the experiences of women and girls with ASD in an easy-to-read manner. It does not necessarily give all the answers for how to start to solve problems (the goal of the book seems to be a more illustrative approach) but can certainly help with understanding and compassion (for self or others).

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

    This book gives a good overview of the life experiences of girls and women with Autism Spectrum Disorder. ASD in females has different characteristics from in males which has led to it being under diagnosed in females due to their ability to mask ASD symptoms through social mimicry. It would have been interesting if the book had said a bit more on the causes of ASD, although the role of genetics is mentioned.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lily

    Would have been 5 stars if it weren’t for the dodgy chapter on gender identity where quotes from people clearly saying they didn’t identify as women were labelled ‘(woman with autism)’ and the author wrote they had ‘no responses from cisgender females now living as men’, and just also seemed very confused about what language to use around fluid gender identities in a book so specifically about women/girls.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Julia Stephenson

    I loved how Hendrickx was able to compile useful information from various sources to create a book about autistic females. In my opinion, it's also inspirational, motivational and supportive. The book covers topics such as school, intense interests, career and even female issues. It definitely breaks the stigma and raises more awareness for each reader. I loved how Hendrickx was able to compile useful information from various sources to create a book about autistic females. In my opinion, it's also inspirational, motivational and supportive. The book covers topics such as school, intense interests, career and even female issues. It definitely breaks the stigma and raises more awareness for each reader.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Very informative book! I’ll sound remarkably silly as heck but I believe what I like best is that I feel, as I read, that, the author is (in a non-literal sense, of course, a friend. (Though I suspect she might feel a bit horrified by this! 🤪). Just very happy and comforting, that sense, even though ridiculous 🤪)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carolina

    There was a lot of great information well organized in chapters, unfortunately I found it too short of a book, there are many parts where they could have been more thorough. But perhaps the publisher needed it to be on the shorter side? Maybe I'm being too picky? Either way, a great well rounded intro book that can help you understand things better and self- diagnose, if need be. There was a lot of great information well organized in chapters, unfortunately I found it too short of a book, there are many parts where they could have been more thorough. But perhaps the publisher needed it to be on the shorter side? Maybe I'm being too picky? Either way, a great well rounded intro book that can help you understand things better and self- diagnose, if need be.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Gautreau

    I am working on getting my own autism diagnosis and this book was incredibly validating. I see myself in every single one of these pages and I know it will provide a great resource in helping me through the process of getting a diagnosis

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