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30 review for The Amazing Spider-Man: Spider-Man No More

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gustavo

    ¿Cuántas veces hemos visto la historia de el héroe al que su identidad superheroica le afecta tanto su vida personal que decide abandonarla "para siempre"? Si bien otras veces ha sido contada quizá con un poco más de elegancia y con una progresión un poco más suave, Lee y Romita fueron de los primeros en hacerla (definitivamente los primeros en Spider-Man, que tuvo sus idas y vueltas con el pasar de los años), y con ella sentaron las bases de una de las historias más clásicas y relevantes de la ¿Cuántas veces hemos visto la historia de el héroe al que su identidad superheroica le afecta tanto su vida personal que decide abandonarla "para siempre"? Si bien otras veces ha sido contada quizá con un poco más de elegancia y con una progresión un poco más suave, Lee y Romita fueron de los primeros en hacerla (definitivamente los primeros en Spider-Man, que tuvo sus idas y vueltas con el pasar de los años), y con ella sentaron las bases de una de las historias más clásicas y relevantes de la historia del comic. Siempre pensé que cuando hablaban de Lee, Kirby, Ditko, Romita y otros como "leyendas", que sus obras serían buenas en el sentido de "eran buenas para su época", pero realmente después de leer varios tomos de estos clásicos estoy empezando a ver que realmente son clásicos sin tiempo. Por suerte me quedan varios tomos más de estos.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Craig B

    Struggled between a 2 and a 3 star rating because the story was really good and I enjoyed it but my god the sexism was really bad.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sammy Young

    Really enjoyed the stories in this one but the sexism was unbelievable and the 60s dialogue was hilarious.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Allan Heron

    From the classic period in the 1960's but a liitle later on with greater character development evident alongside beginning to really lean in to the approach that distinguished Marvel from their rivals. From the classic period in the 1960's but a liitle later on with greater character development evident alongside beginning to really lean in to the approach that distinguished Marvel from their rivals.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chris Turner

    There is a lot more dialogue than other comics, but this is a good thing. The characters are great, even if the slang has dated poorly. The stories are OK, a little too much hyperbole for my liking. Overall though, good run of comics.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dion

    Great fun, emotional and action-packed trip down memory lane. Love that 60s dialogue, dad! Wonderful to see that iconic panel and cover in context. Really felt the villains held a threat to our favourite wall-crawler, from Kraven to Lizard and Vulture.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jon Arnold

    Steve Ditko was magnificent but Ditko was also a little strange, his hero all bones, sharp angles and weirdness. You could believe this was a guy J Jonah Jameson could easily get away with painting as a bad guy. But the thing with strange is that it can put people off. Enter John Romita Snr. This collection’s from the point at which Romita Snr found his groove with Spider-Man, fleshing him out so that he looked a little more conventional, sanding the slightly strange edge off that attracted the k Steve Ditko was magnificent but Ditko was also a little strange, his hero all bones, sharp angles and weirdness. You could believe this was a guy J Jonah Jameson could easily get away with painting as a bad guy. But the thing with strange is that it can put people off. Enter John Romita Snr. This collection’s from the point at which Romita Snr found his groove with Spider-Man, fleshing him out so that he looked a little more conventional, sanding the slightly strange edge off that attracted the kids in the first place and offered a reason to keep reading when endless fights got dull. Spidey’s far more conventionally heroic in this collection, which perhaps plays a little against him being the wish-fulfilment nerd outcast of Ditko’s version. The wisecracks seem to be more an attempt to play on the minds of the villains rather than pure bravado, even though the discrepancy between thought and speech often remains. You can argue that the thought bubble falling out of fashion is a sign of comics becoming more sophisticated but there’s a certain something lost with it, the touching vulnerability even in battle. On the other hand you can buy this version kicking seven bells out of the likes of Kraven and the Vulture far more easily and it makes the rest of what Romita brings far easier to accept. Ditko himself was clearly far more interested in the Nietzchean superheroics than the background character stuff; in an ordinary individual fighting back where conventional laws and means are inadequate. Romita’s quite the opposite, if anything this is where the actual character work Lee and Ditko had wound into the DNA of the strip pays off. Drawing heavily on the romance comics he’d worked on, Romita’s Spider-Man puts far more prominence on Peter Parker’s ordinary life (one ‘next time’ trailer promises ‘Peter Parker’s pad!’ rather than any supervillain thrills). There’s a certain amount of development Peter’s ordinary life (moving out of his aunt’s, having a job offer) but for the most part the character relationships remain in stasis, which can irritate when for seven issues Mary Jane and Gwen appear to be simply trying to impress without him noticing them. I know, having been a teenage boy, that they can be ignorant but over the months what begins as amusing ends up a touch irritating. What’s fascinating though is the story arc woven in here, little touches of Peter doubting whether being Spider-Man is worthwhile or not. It culminates in issue 50, which gives the title to this collection, where he gives up his mask and webbing. Modern comics insist on big events for significantly numbered books so for issue 50 to be a character piece which quietly restates Spider-Man’s motivations is a pleasant, nostalgic thrill. He encounters no supervillains (Kingpin makes an appearance at the edge of the story) and only foils minor crime. Slang and developing techniques may have aged the presentation but it’s a small reminder of what mainstream superhero comics have largely lost. In that sense this is a well-chosen period piece that’s a perfect example of what Romita brought to the Marvel universe.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ian Williamson

    Although it had been successful since it's inception with Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, it was when John Romita Snr took the reins that the book really took off. It is slightly dated at times with it's vernacular, especially now that a lot of the kid speak has a completely different connotation today, these stories still hold up well. The characters and story are as relevant then as they are today and just as enjoyable. Stan Lee shows why he is Mr Marvel and why spiderman is the flagship Marvel titl Although it had been successful since it's inception with Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, it was when John Romita Snr took the reins that the book really took off. It is slightly dated at times with it's vernacular, especially now that a lot of the kid speak has a completely different connotation today, these stories still hold up well. The characters and story are as relevant then as they are today and just as enjoyable. Stan Lee shows why he is Mr Marvel and why spiderman is the flagship Marvel title. The artwork is still amazing although it can seem a bit rigid compared to artists now. I think I loved this title more due to the nostalgia from the absolutely amazing spiderman story by Jeph Loeb called spiderman blue, a poignant and emotional final send off to Gwen Stacy which is very much set these stories here.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tehanu

    This comic turns 50 years next month. Can you believe that? We all kinda know how old these superheroes are, but do we actually comprehend those numbers? Besides, it doesn't feel like a half century old piece of literature (sure, there are some elements that feel dated, the Vietnam war, the social dynamics, etc), it feels fresh, relevant. I have read other comics of the same time period and written by the same author (Stan Lee), but I haven't felt the same freshness. I think that credit is due to This comic turns 50 years next month. Can you believe that? We all kinda know how old these superheroes are, but do we actually comprehend those numbers? Besides, it doesn't feel like a half century old piece of literature (sure, there are some elements that feel dated, the Vietnam war, the social dynamics, etc), it feels fresh, relevant. I have read other comics of the same time period and written by the same author (Stan Lee), but I haven't felt the same freshness. I think that credit is due to John Romita Sr.'s art and whatever influence he had in the writing process (in more than one ocassion, the narrator makes fun of him for drawing too much of Peter Parker and too little of Spidey). Sorry if my review sucks, I'm too tired and I can't quite think, much less in English xD

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mark Phillips

    Anthology contain a run of The Amazing Spider-man from #44 to #50 written by Stan Lee and illustrated by John Romita after Steve Ditko moved on. As with all the classic tales it is more an anthology than a novel. There is progression in the story telling but it removes around the villain of the week. I do love the way the classic break the wall between the page and the reader with the little editorial footnotes. I do find the need to tell rather than showing a tad jarring. I guess it it is proof Anthology contain a run of The Amazing Spider-man from #44 to #50 written by Stan Lee and illustrated by John Romita after Steve Ditko moved on. As with all the classic tales it is more an anthology than a novel. There is progression in the story telling but it removes around the villain of the week. I do love the way the classic break the wall between the page and the reader with the little editorial footnotes. I do find the need to tell rather than showing a tad jarring. I guess it it is proof of the way in which story telling has developed in the past 50 years. One thing I noticed is how much J Jonah Jameson reminds me of Rupert Murdoch in the way he controls the news to emphasis his agenda.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    Petr Parker je prostě lumen. Trousí hlášky a pro humor nejde příliš moc daleko. Zrovna včera běžel v TV film Spiderman 2, který některé scény z komiksu přímo parafrázuje, ale na rozdíl od komiksu to vypadá strašně kýčovitě. To co snesu v komiksu, který má úplně jinou dynamiku a pracuje i s nevyřčeným, nemusím snést ve filmu který je až příliš doslovný. Ano, ve filmu a i v knize Spiderman neskončí i když má velkou krizi své pavoučí identity. Oproti prvnímu kreslíři (Steve Ditko) který se Spiderma Petr Parker je prostě lumen. Trousí hlášky a pro humor nejde příliš moc daleko. Zrovna včera běžel v TV film Spiderman 2, který některé scény z komiksu přímo parafrázuje, ale na rozdíl od komiksu to vypadá strašně kýčovitě. To co snesu v komiksu, který má úplně jinou dynamiku a pracuje i s nevyřčeným, nemusím snést ve filmu který je až příliš doslovný. Ano, ve filmu a i v knize Spiderman neskončí i když má velkou krizi své pavoučí identity. Oproti prvnímu kreslíři (Steve Ditko) který se Spidermanem začal, je kresba tohoto už v pořadí druhého kreslíře (John Romita Sr.) dynamická a stále moderní - tohle si představím, když se řekne americký komiks.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michal Vámoš

    Je mi to i trochu líto, ale z tohoto mám opravdu smíšené pocity. Příběhově to je poněkud obstojné (nejlépe na tom je asi samotné padesáté číslo), ale celkově to u mě propadlo. Postavy jednají velmi nelogicky (Peter si uvědomí, že nemůže přestat nosit kostým jen proto, že si vzpomene, že kdysi žil nějakej strýček Ben) a vůbec, občas je to velmi směšné nebo otravné (Kraven, který asi z bradavek střílí výboje nebo děsně otravná teta May, která ale dost "perlila"). Nejhorší ale byla ta ukecanost, kv Je mi to i trochu líto, ale z tohoto mám opravdu smíšené pocity. Příběhově to je poněkud obstojné (nejlépe na tom je asi samotné padesáté číslo), ale celkově to u mě propadlo. Postavy jednají velmi nelogicky (Peter si uvědomí, že nemůže přestat nosit kostým jen proto, že si vzpomene, že kdysi žil nějakej strýček Ben) a vůbec, občas je to velmi směšné nebo otravné (Kraven, který asi z bradavek střílí výboje nebo děsně otravná teta May, která ale dost "perlila"). Nejhorší ale byla ta ukecanost, kvůli které mi jedno číslo trvalo přečíst strašně dlouho. Aspoň Romitova kresba měla něco do sebe.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Berrie

    A relatively decent storyline about Peter Parker having doubts about being Spider-Man and then remembering why he became Spider-Man in the first place. Not a lot of surprises here and the attitudes of the supporting characters date this comic greatly. Should be 3.5 stars, but not 4.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Johnny Andrews

    Old school but greatness.

  15. 5 out of 5

    July

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kuba

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alan Lamounier

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pablo

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rax

  20. 5 out of 5

    Juan Gaya

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gateacre

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vendula Kreplová

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lee Gannon

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mirv

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christian Doig

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mick

  27. 4 out of 5

    Strzelba

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jacek Litka

  29. 4 out of 5

    Pitágoras Alves

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gwainhir

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