Hot Best Seller

Short Talks: Brick Books Classics 1

Availability: Ready to download

Poetry. Deluxe redesign of the two-time Griffin Award winner's first poetry collection. On the occasion of the press's 40th anniversary, Brick Books is proud to present the first of six new editions of classic books from our back catalogue. New material includes a foreword by the poet Margaret Christakos, a "Short Talk on Afterwords" by Carson herself, and cover art and de Poetry. Deluxe redesign of the two-time Griffin Award winner's first poetry collection. On the occasion of the press's 40th anniversary, Brick Books is proud to present the first of six new editions of classic books from our back catalogue. New material includes a foreword by the poet Margaret Christakos, a "Short Talk on Afterwords" by Carson herself, and cover art and design by the renowned typographer Robert Bringhurst. First issued in 1992, SHORT TALKS is Carson's first and only collection of poems published with an independent Canadian press. It announced the arrival of a profound, elegiac and biting new voice. SHORT TALKS can comfortably stand alongside Carson's other bestselling and award-winning works. The renowned ancient Greek scholar's first book beautifully reprinted on amazing paper, with an extra "short talk" on afterwords functioning as the afterword. Sometimes humorous, other times eerie, these prose poems range in topic from waterproofing to Gertrude Stein at 9:30 at night the most fascinating micro lectures you'll ever attend. Nobody has not bought this book after opening it. Open Books Indie Recommend"


Compare

Poetry. Deluxe redesign of the two-time Griffin Award winner's first poetry collection. On the occasion of the press's 40th anniversary, Brick Books is proud to present the first of six new editions of classic books from our back catalogue. New material includes a foreword by the poet Margaret Christakos, a "Short Talk on Afterwords" by Carson herself, and cover art and de Poetry. Deluxe redesign of the two-time Griffin Award winner's first poetry collection. On the occasion of the press's 40th anniversary, Brick Books is proud to present the first of six new editions of classic books from our back catalogue. New material includes a foreword by the poet Margaret Christakos, a "Short Talk on Afterwords" by Carson herself, and cover art and design by the renowned typographer Robert Bringhurst. First issued in 1992, SHORT TALKS is Carson's first and only collection of poems published with an independent Canadian press. It announced the arrival of a profound, elegiac and biting new voice. SHORT TALKS can comfortably stand alongside Carson's other bestselling and award-winning works. The renowned ancient Greek scholar's first book beautifully reprinted on amazing paper, with an extra "short talk" on afterwords functioning as the afterword. Sometimes humorous, other times eerie, these prose poems range in topic from waterproofing to Gertrude Stein at 9:30 at night the most fascinating micro lectures you'll ever attend. Nobody has not bought this book after opening it. Open Books Indie Recommend"

30 review for Short Talks: Brick Books Classics 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Never

    This is like an experiment in how few words a poet can use to tear your heart out, or maybe just run her fingernails across it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    hayden

    absolutely fantastic. aaaaagh.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

    Each piece in Anne Carson's Short Talks is a startling gem - some disorienting, some intimate, some wry, some wistful, many bright and impish. My favourite, combining almost all of those states, is: Short Talk on Bonheur D'Etre Bien Aimee Day after day I think of you as soon as I wake up. Someone has put cries of birds on the air like jewels. This volume, slender in multiple dimensions, will be so easy to go back to again and again. Each piece in Anne Carson's Short Talks is a startling gem - some disorienting, some intimate, some wry, some wistful, many bright and impish. My favourite, combining almost all of those states, is: Short Talk on Bonheur D'Etre Bien Aimee Day after day I think of you as soon as I wake up. Someone has put cries of birds on the air like jewels. This volume, slender in multiple dimensions, will be so easy to go back to again and again.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kassie

    I've been carrying around this book; borrowed from an American library on inter-library loan, in my bag for about a month. Reading a passage or 2 or 10 whenever I get the chance, flicking through it until a title jumps out at me. I read it cover to cover on the train this morning and I'll be sad to return it soon. Always nice to get lost in a good bit of poetry. I've been carrying around this book; borrowed from an American library on inter-library loan, in my bag for about a month. Reading a passage or 2 or 10 whenever I get the chance, flicking through it until a title jumps out at me. I read it cover to cover on the train this morning and I'll be sad to return it soon. Always nice to get lost in a good bit of poetry.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Catalina J. García

    Me cuesta pero me gusta. Leído en un ilegal ocio mientras se suponía que estuviese trabajando. Favoritos: On hopes On Gertrude Stein about 9.30 On housing On dissapointments in music On why some people find trains exciting On autism On the rules of perspective On walking backwards On waterproofing On reading On rain On vicuñas On sunday dinner with father On the sensation of aeroplane takeoff On the king and his courage

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    "You can never know enough, never work enough, never use the infinitives and participles oddly enough, never impede the movement harshly enough, never leave the mind quickly enough." These are aphorisms of dense elliptical lyricism, wound tightly in the forge of momentary effort. They will give you strength to wield the roughness of life's associative thinking. "You can never know enough, never work enough, never use the infinitives and participles oddly enough, never impede the movement harshly enough, never leave the mind quickly enough." These are aphorisms of dense elliptical lyricism, wound tightly in the forge of momentary effort. They will give you strength to wield the roughness of life's associative thinking.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Damian

    I'm beginning to think Anne Carson can do no wrong, or write any wrong words. I'm beginning to think Anne Carson can do no wrong, or write any wrong words.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Janine

    Anne Carson sprinkles magic on her words.

  9. 5 out of 5

    savannah

    ”Beauty makes me hopeless. I don’t care why anymore I just want to get away. When I look at the city of Paris I long to wrap my legs around it. When I watch you dancing there is a heartless immensity like a sailor in a dead calm sea. Desires as round as peaches bloom in me all night, I no longer gather what falls.”

  10. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Hayes

    Genre: Concentrated Fragmentary Synaesthetic Zingers 5/5 ⭐ Described by Margaret Christakos in the beautifully written introduction as "45 small taut rectangles of poetic address that each frame a seismic smithering of the human condition." Short Talk on Homo Sapiens With small cuts Cro-Magnon man recorded the moon's phases on the handles of his tools, thinking about her as he worked. Animals. Horizon. Face in a pan of water. In every story I tell comes a point where I can see no further. I hate tha Genre: Concentrated Fragmentary Synaesthetic Zingers 5/5 ⭐ Described by Margaret Christakos in the beautifully written introduction as "45 small taut rectangles of poetic address that each frame a seismic smithering of the human condition." Short Talk on Homo Sapiens With small cuts Cro-Magnon man recorded the moon's phases on the handles of his tools, thinking about her as he worked. Animals. Horizon. Face in a pan of water. In every story I tell comes a point where I can see no further. I hate that point. It is why they call storytellers blind - a taunt.

  11. 5 out of 5

    michal k-c

    might be an unpopular opinion but i think Carson works best in short format... reminded me of Koestenbaum’s Pink Trance Notebooks which is a huge plus. Carson knows how to stretch the meaning of an exclamation point better than most!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amy Layton

    This short book is perfect for a small flight, a quick bus ride, or a commuter train. I've been a fan of Carson's poetry ever since I read The Autobiography of Red, and this book did not disappoint. Carson truly has a way of weaving words that leave you feeling a little heavy-hearted as well as satisfied. Her creativity and imagination never ceases to amaze me. I wish I could find out how she can create worlds out of everyday things. Get the full review here! This short book is perfect for a small flight, a quick bus ride, or a commuter train. I've been a fan of Carson's poetry ever since I read The Autobiography of Red, and this book did not disappoint. Carson truly has a way of weaving words that leave you feeling a little heavy-hearted as well as satisfied. Her creativity and imagination never ceases to amaze me. I wish I could find out how she can create worlds out of everyday things. Get the full review here!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leonor

    Oh, Anne ♥ Favorites include short talk on major and minor and short talk on rectification.

  14. 4 out of 5

    T

    This is about where my thinking is of late. I will need to re-read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carl Denton

    wild and weird

  16. 5 out of 5

    Moa Rantala

    "Day after day I think of you as soon as I wake up. Someone has put cries of birds on the air like jewels." "The important thing was, someone to yearn for. Whether the quilt was long, or the night was too long, or you were given this place to sleep or that place to sleep, someone to wait for until she is coming along and the grass is stirring, a tomato in her palm." "Day after day I think of you as soon as I wake up. Someone has put cries of birds on the air like jewels." "The important thing was, someone to yearn for. Whether the quilt was long, or the night was too long, or you were given this place to sleep or that place to sleep, someone to wait for until she is coming along and the grass is stirring, a tomato in her palm."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    Not the easiest book to find but supremely worth the effort. Each poem is actually a 5-30 second "lecture" on a particular topic. I can't even tell you how many of lines from this book have made it into my everyday vocabulary. From the sublime to the everyday, Anne Carson's incredible talent with words weaves these lovely brief poems into a deceptive simplicity that easily gets them stuck in your head. I have a few photocopied and taped onto my wall. She's a genius flower, no doubt about it. Not the easiest book to find but supremely worth the effort. Each poem is actually a 5-30 second "lecture" on a particular topic. I can't even tell you how many of lines from this book have made it into my everyday vocabulary. From the sublime to the everyday, Anne Carson's incredible talent with words weaves these lovely brief poems into a deceptive simplicity that easily gets them stuck in your head. I have a few photocopied and taped onto my wall. She's a genius flower, no doubt about it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Del

    anne carson seems to always know how to get me with her words. a lovely short read that i will be revisiting very soon, for sure.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Day after day I think of you as soon as I wake up. Someone has put cries of birds on the air like jewels. or The reason I drink is to understand the yellow sky the great yellow sky, said Van Gogh. When he looked at the world he saw the nails that attached colours to things and he saw that the nails were in pain. What a voice.

  20. 4 out of 5

    gash

    "My task is to carry secret burdens for the world. People watch curiously. Yesterday morning at sunrise for example, you could have seen me on the breakwall carrying gauze. I also carry untimely ideas and sins in general or any faulty action that has been lowered together with you into this hour. Trust me. The trotting animal can restore red hearts to red." "My task is to carry secret burdens for the world. People watch curiously. Yesterday morning at sunrise for example, you could have seen me on the breakwall carrying gauze. I also carry untimely ideas and sins in general or any faulty action that has been lowered together with you into this hour. Trust me. The trotting animal can restore red hearts to red."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

    I picked this book up this morning and felt a little thrill. I love this book. The poems are like these short little creatures of force, stunning and then over. The painting on the cover is by her.

  22. 5 out of 5

    elizabeth

    short. complete. mostly brilliant.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nico

    "Short Talk on the Sensation of Airplane Takeoff" invariably makes me cry. Invariably. Somehow I think this is a good thing. "Short Talk on the Sensation of Airplane Takeoff" invariably makes me cry. Invariably. Somehow I think this is a good thing.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Neocortext

    Anne Carson retunes my brain and sets my rhythms aright. I read this slowly, in small bites--because of the richness.

  25. 4 out of 5

    G Léger

    I wish I could do justice to this book. The pieces in it can be read as micro essays or prose poems. They are beautiful, pithy, and will punch you in the heart.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Little explosions of poems.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Life changing

  28. 5 out of 5

    Don LaVange

    Have not read much in here. What I saw, I liked. Bought this for a class.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Glen

    A lovely birthday gift that I read most of on a flight to Denver the other week. I just finished it up this afternoon, and it's one of those books I'm sure I'll get something completely different from whenever I reread it. I enjoyed a lot of the phrases in Christakos' introduction, even though as a whole I found it pretty pretentious. Her summary of the book is correct: "45 small taut rectangles of poetic address that each frame a seismic smithering of the human condition." My favorite line from A lovely birthday gift that I read most of on a flight to Denver the other week. I just finished it up this afternoon, and it's one of those books I'm sure I'll get something completely different from whenever I reread it. I enjoyed a lot of the phrases in Christakos' introduction, even though as a whole I found it pretty pretentious. Her summary of the book is correct: "45 small taut rectangles of poetic address that each frame a seismic smithering of the human condition." My favorite line from the introduction: — "Winter is a weather of mind. Don't get too uppity about your own authority over things, and sort out what to make of boredom as shapeshifter: the silence around thought is part of its sculpture." And a few favorite short talks: — "It lies on the other side of attention, a long lazy boat ride from here." — short talk on chromo-luminarism — "He sits down at the table; people in exile write so many letters... Each night about this time he puts on sadness like a garment and goes on writing." — short talk on Ovid — "When advised not to speak by doctors in the sanatorium, he left glass sentences all over the floor. Felice, says one of them, had too much nakedness left in her." — short talk on rectification — "Cut and cut deep to find the source of the problem, Dr. Deyman is saying, as he parts the brain to either side like hair. Sadness comes groping out of it." — short talk on the anatomy lesson — "We live by tunneling for we are people buried alive." — short talk on orchids — "Desires as round as peaches bloom in me all night, I no longer gather what falls." — short talk on hedonism —"He arose laden with doubt as to how he should begin. He looked back at the bed where the grindstone lay. He looked out at the world, the most famous experimental prison of its time. Beyond the torture stakes he could see, nothing. Yet he could see." — short talk on the kind and his courage

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Extraordinary, extraordinary, extraordinary. I would, of course, tell my students that the above is a sentence fragment and verboten, but in reading this collection I submit the grammarian in me to Carson's stinging genius: "You can never know enough, never work enough, never use the infinitives and participles oddly enough, ... never leave the mind quickly enough" (9). It's a recipe for creativity by a woman whom, one suspects, eschews recipes. Except Carson doesn't really leave the mind. Oh, ye Extraordinary, extraordinary, extraordinary. I would, of course, tell my students that the above is a sentence fragment and verboten, but in reading this collection I submit the grammarian in me to Carson's stinging genius: "You can never know enough, never work enough, never use the infinitives and participles oddly enough, ... never leave the mind quickly enough" (9). It's a recipe for creativity by a woman whom, one suspects, eschews recipes. Except Carson doesn't really leave the mind. Oh, yes, she gets beyond "the boredom of a story"--linearity, plated conclusion--but in pieces that leap illusively (and allusively) lightly from Sylvia Plath to Noah to "the sensation of aeroplane takeoff" there is the wonder of a mind at play. While a few of the prose poems were somewhat challenging to enter into, most of those immediately rewarded a little research and a rereading; for dozens, the first word that occurred to me was, indeed, "Extraordinary!" This book is an opening; it takes me back to a place of melded play and work that I once inhabited in Florence. These poems are presence and invitation: "Replace the door when you leave. ... Who are you?" P.S. Yes, I have gone and liked every five star review of this book on Goodreads. It is apparent that others also find that Anne Carson is a gift.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...