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The Year's Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2015 Edition

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This seventh volume of the year's best science fiction and fantasy features over thirty stories by some of the genre's greatest authors, including Elizabeth Bear, Paul Cornell, Cory Doctorow, James Patrick Kelly, Yoon Ha Lee, Kelly Link, Ken Liu, Sandra MacDonald, K.J. Parker, Robert Reed, Peter Watts, and many others. Selecting the best fiction from Asimov's, Clarkesworld This seventh volume of the year's best science fiction and fantasy features over thirty stories by some of the genre's greatest authors, including Elizabeth Bear, Paul Cornell, Cory Doctorow, James Patrick Kelly, Yoon Ha Lee, Kelly Link, Ken Liu, Sandra MacDonald, K.J. Parker, Robert Reed, Peter Watts, and many others. Selecting the best fiction from Asimov's, Clarkesworld, F&SF, Lightspeed, Subterranean, and other top venues, The Year's Best Science Fiction & Fantasy is your guide to magical realms and worlds beyond tomorrow.


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This seventh volume of the year's best science fiction and fantasy features over thirty stories by some of the genre's greatest authors, including Elizabeth Bear, Paul Cornell, Cory Doctorow, James Patrick Kelly, Yoon Ha Lee, Kelly Link, Ken Liu, Sandra MacDonald, K.J. Parker, Robert Reed, Peter Watts, and many others. Selecting the best fiction from Asimov's, Clarkesworld This seventh volume of the year's best science fiction and fantasy features over thirty stories by some of the genre's greatest authors, including Elizabeth Bear, Paul Cornell, Cory Doctorow, James Patrick Kelly, Yoon Ha Lee, Kelly Link, Ken Liu, Sandra MacDonald, K.J. Parker, Robert Reed, Peter Watts, and many others. Selecting the best fiction from Asimov's, Clarkesworld, F&SF, Lightspeed, Subterranean, and other top venues, The Year's Best Science Fiction & Fantasy is your guide to magical realms and worlds beyond tomorrow.

30 review for The Year's Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2015 Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    RJ - Slayer of Trolls

    A better title might have been "Some of the Year's Best Science Fiction & Fantasy, Plus a Whole Bunch of Other Stories That Aren't Very Good." Probably too long for typesetting. Stories (and my ratings on a scale of 1-5) include: - "Schools of Clay" by Derek Kunsken - 3/5 - "The Scrivener" by Eleanor Arnason - 4/5 - "Invisible Planets" by Hannu Rajaniemi -1/5 - "Heaven Thunders the Truth" by K.J. Parker - 4/5 - "Selfie" by Sandra McDonald - 4/5 - "The Manor of Lost Time" by Richard Parks - 4/5 - A better title might have been "Some of the Year's Best Science Fiction & Fantasy, Plus a Whole Bunch of Other Stories That Aren't Very Good." Probably too long for typesetting. Stories (and my ratings on a scale of 1-5) include: - "Schools of Clay" by Derek Kunsken - 3/5 - "The Scrivener" by Eleanor Arnason - 4/5 - "Invisible Planets" by Hannu Rajaniemi -1/5 - "Heaven Thunders the Truth" by K.J. Parker - 4/5 - "Selfie" by Sandra McDonald - 4/5 - "The Manor of Lost Time" by Richard Parks - 4/5 - "How to Get Back to the Forest" by Sofia Samatar - 2/5 - "Wine" by Yoon Ha Lee - 2/5 - "Every Hill Ends With Sky" by Robert Reed - 3/5 - "The Endless Sink" by Damien Ober - 3/5 - "The Long Haul, From the Annals of Transportation, The Pacific Monthly, May 2009" by Ken Liu - 2/5 - "A Guide to the Fruits of Hawai'i" by Alaya Dawn Johnson - 2/5 - "Ghost Story" by John Grant - 3/5 - "Break! Break! Break!" by Charlie Jane Anders - 2/5 - "Skull and Hyssop" by Kathleen Jennings - 1/5 - "Someday" by James Patrick Kelly - 2/5 - "Cimmeria: From the Journal of Imaginary Anthropology" by Theodora Goss - 3/5 - "Drones Don't Kill People" by Annalee Newitz - 4/5 - "I Can See Right Through You" by Kelly Link - 2/5 - "Petard: A Tale of Just Deserts" by Cory Doctorow - 5/5 - "The Wild and Hungry Times" by Patricia Russo - 2/5 - "Trademark Bugs: A Legal History" by Adam Roberts - 2/5 - "A Better Way to Die" by Paul Cornell - 1/5 - "The Instructive Tale of the Archeologist and His Wife" by Alexander Jablokov - 3/5 - "Fift & Shria" by Benjamin Rosenbaum - 1/5 - "The Magician and Laplace's Demon" by Tom Crosshill - 4/5 - "The Hand is Quicker" by Elizabeth Bear - 3/5 - "Sleeper" by Jo Walton - 4/5 - "Grand Jete (The Great Leap)" by Rachel Swirsky - 3/5 - "Pernicious Romance" by Robert Reed - 3/5 - "Witch, Beast, Saint: An Erotic Fairy Tale" by C.S.E. Cooney - 2/5 - "Collateral" by Peter Watts - 4/5 - "Aberration" by Genevieve Valentine - 2/5 - "Sadness" by Timons Esaias - 1/5

  2. 4 out of 5

    Peter Tillman

    TOC: http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?5... I've read a fair number of these stories previously. Some are available as online copies; I'll note and link these if I'm aware of them. 11/26/20 note: resuming reading, as I finally remembered to check it out of the library again. The review to read is by Jaffa Kintigh, https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Note that he links a detailed review of (I think) each story. Of the ones we've both read, I pretty much agree with his ratings, so I'll be able TOC: http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?5... I've read a fair number of these stories previously. Some are available as online copies; I'll note and link these if I'm aware of them. 11/26/20 note: resuming reading, as I finally remembered to check it out of the library again. The review to read is by Jaffa Kintigh, https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Note that he links a detailed review of (I think) each story. Of the ones we've both read, I pretty much agree with his ratings, so I'll be able to spend less time reviewing this oldish collection, and more time enjoying it. Win-win! It's a good anthology. I recommend it. Here are my favorite stories, mostly SF: • Schools of Clay • (2014) • novelette by Derek Künsken. Included in the Kindle free sample, which is where I read it. Unusual story of class-warfare within a VERY alien race. Nicely done, though a bit heavy-handed. Strong 4 stars. Lois Tilton reviewed it at Locus, https://locusmag.com/2013/12/lois-til..., and listed it as a Year's Best. 4 stars for me. • The Scrivener (2013), short story by Eleanor Arnason. Online at https://subterraneanpress.com/magazin.... Previously read. Read https://jaffalogue.wordpress.com/2015... if you want the details. 4 stars by memory, and if you're an Arnason fan, you won't want to miss it. • Pernicious Romance (2014), short story by Robert Reed. Just read Jaffa's, https://jaffalogue.wordpress.com/2015... 4 stars from me. • Witch, Beast, Saint: an Erotic Fairy Tale (2014), short story by C. S. E. Cooney. About just what it says, with startlingly explicit sex. Online at http://strangehorizons.com/fiction/wi... 4 stars, if you like that sort of thing. New to me writer. More at https://csecooney.com/publications/ Editor Rich Horton and I are long-time online acquaintances. We were colleagues at SF Site. We have similar tastes, so I'm gradually catching up on his SF/F anthologies.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jockum

    Vissa bra, vissa mindre bra och en del hoppades över. De tre bästa novellerna var: "The Long Haul From the ANNALS OF TRANSPORTATION" "Skull and Hyssop" "Drones don't kill people" Vissa bra, vissa mindre bra och en del hoppades över. De tre bästa novellerna var: "The Long Haul From the ANNALS OF TRANSPORTATION" "Skull and Hyssop" "Drones don't kill people"

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jaffa Kintigh

    This anthology promises the best in new stories and delivers on that promise more than not. I missed having a unifying theme to the stories that really explored a topic like my other experiences with Prime Books anthologies, but I've also never had so many 4- and 5-star ratings in one anthology before (17 of the 34 stories). The strength of this collection is in the speculative fiction inclusions. All 7 tales I've rated with 5-stars take a look at the near future. Four question the nature of rea This anthology promises the best in new stories and delivers on that promise more than not. I missed having a unifying theme to the stories that really explored a topic like my other experiences with Prime Books anthologies, but I've also never had so many 4- and 5-star ratings in one anthology before (17 of the 34 stories). The strength of this collection is in the speculative fiction inclusions. All 7 tales I've rated with 5-stars take a look at the near future. Four question the nature of reality: Rajaniemi, Grant, Goss, and Reed. Four question the nature of self: McDonald, Swirsky, Grant, and Goss. The seventh, by Roberts, provides a scathing assessment of the politics of the legal, pharmaceutical, and medical industries. I've taken the time to review and rate each story in the anthology: Goss, Theodora--"Cimmeria: From the Journal of Imaginary Anthropology"--5 stars Grant, John--"Ghost Story"--5 stars McDonald, Sandra--"Selfie"--5 stars Rajaniemi, Hannu--"Invisible Planets"--5 stars Reed, Robert--"Pernicious Romance"--5 stars Roberts, Adam--"Trademark Bugs: A Legal History"--5 stars Swirsky, Rachel--"Grand Jete (The Great Leap)"--5 stars Arnason, Eleanor--"The Scrivener"--4 stars Bear, Elizabeth--"The Hand is Quicker--"--4 stars Jennings, Kathleen--"Skull and Hyssop"--4 stars Johnson, Alaya Dawn--"A Guide to the Fruits of Hawai'i"--4 stars Kelly, James Patrick--"Someday"--4 stars Kunsken, Derek--"Schools of Clay"--4 stars Ober, Damien--"The Endless Sink"--4 stars Parker, K. J.--"Heaven Thunders the Truth"--4 stars Parks, Richard--"The Manor of Lost Time--4 stars Walton, Jo--"Sleeper"--4 stars Also included: Cooney, C. S. E.--"Witch, Beast, Saint: An Erotic Fairy Tale"--3 stars Doctorow, Cory--"Petard: A Tale of Just Deserts"--3 stars Esaias, Timons--"Sadness"--3 stars Jablokov, Alexander--"The Instructive Tale of the Archaeologist and His Wife"--3 stars Lee, Yoon Ha--"Wine"--3 stars Newitz, Annalee--"Drones Don't Kill People"--3 stars Rosenbaum, Benjamin--"Fift & Shria"--3 stars Russo, Patricia--"The Wild and Hungry Times"--3 stars Watts, Peter--"Collateral"--3 stars Anders, Charlie Jane--"Break! Break! Break!"--2 stars Cornell, Paul--"A Better Way To Die"--2 stars Crosshill, Tom--"The Magician and Laplace's Demon"--2 stars Link, Kelly--"I Can See Right Through You"--2 stars Liu, Ken--"The Long Haul: From the Annuls of Transportation, The Pacific Monthly, May 2009"--2 stars Reed, Robert--"Every Hill Ends With Sky"--2 stars Samatar, Sofia--"How to Get Back to the Forest"--2 stars Valentine, Genevieve--"Aberration"--1 star I received my copy of the anthology directly from Prime Books. This collection is highly recommended. Previously, I've reviewed three other Prime Books anthologies: After the End: Recent Apocalypses --4 stars Extreme Zombies --4 stars Mermaids and Other Mysteries of the Deep --4 stars

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ebenmaessiger

    "Schools of Clay," by Derek Künsken: 9.5 - Taste is fickle, yes, although I tend to trust Rich Horton most when it comes to these sorts of things, tending explicitly, as he does, towards an sf in which a work’s literary qualities are placed on a footing equal to its purely sfnal qualities. Or, more importantly, he approaches the matter with a first-principles recognition that these qualities are at least not the same (save that recalcitrant, if understandable, love he seems to harbor for Gene W "Schools of Clay," by Derek Künsken: 9.5 - Taste is fickle, yes, although I tend to trust Rich Horton most when it comes to these sorts of things, tending explicitly, as he does, towards an sf in which a work’s literary qualities are placed on a footing equal to its purely sfnal qualities. Or, more importantly, he approaches the matter with a first-principles recognition that these qualities are at least not the same (save that recalcitrant, if understandable, love he seems to harbor for Gene Wolfe). That distinction, between (put crudely) prose/style/psychologicalacuity and sensa/estrangement/worldbuilding is therefore not necessarily one to be collapsed, but one to be mediated—one to be proportioned. Long preamble short, he hits the mark here. A straightforward tale of allegorical social sf, in which neither element – the game of ‘let’s slot these markers of class/society into their real world analogues’ and the enjoyment of seeing this truly foreign world so confidently fleshed out – overwhelms, but instead complements the other. We’re thrown into the deep end immediately and we’re made to swim. When our strokes catch, though, the story finds a propulsion that other sfnal tales of a similar thematic ilk would have trouble reaching (and the broader question [whence the great materialist sf?], we’ll table). The class element is done well here, with interesting nuggets of nuance thrown in -- lest the crie de couer become too heavy handed -- such as the unresolved tension between reform and revolution (an evergreen topic), the ‘traitor to his class’ element with our protagonist (bespeaking the difficulty of the endeavor in the first place), and the broader feeling that the system can’t but replicate itself anew even on their now idyllic enclave, given the broader constraints of their closed environment [the Maw and the shaghal]. Good stuff.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jonan Grobler

    Always tough to judge these sorts of collections. You know what you're getting yourself in for, though. If you like engaging your mind with new ideas, characters and worlds every 10 minutes or so, you'll get a great kick out of this. I've rated the stories, in order of best to meh, so you can just read to cool ones (if that's your type of thing!): 5/5: Schools of Clay (robot bee colony, workers rising up against the higher classes) The Endless Sink (floating islands, colonies of people with differen Always tough to judge these sorts of collections. You know what you're getting yourself in for, though. If you like engaging your mind with new ideas, characters and worlds every 10 minutes or so, you'll get a great kick out of this. I've rated the stories, in order of best to meh, so you can just read to cool ones (if that's your type of thing!): 5/5: Schools of Clay (robot bee colony, workers rising up against the higher classes) The Endless Sink (floating islands, colonies of people with different cultures living on them) Break! Break! Break! (madcap first person story, this one's less about plot and more about amazing writing) Skull and Hyssop (Firefly type of story, a strange cargo, secret government plans, stowaways) The Magician and Laplace's Demon (fascinating story of a sentient AI chasing down a magician across space. Best ending, as well) 4/5: Heaven Thunders the Truth (young magician who talks to dead people) How to Get Back to the Forest (Ishiguro-lite, Never Let Me Go-ish) The Long Haul (journalist's tale of time spent on a transatlantic blimp voyage) Ghost Story (man gets a message from an old girlfriend, she tells him she's pregnant - multiverse story thing) Fift & Shria (confusing story, where people are able to inhabit many bodies simultaneously, this setup is used to tell the story of standing up to bullies, and growing up) - 3/5 - The Scrivener (a modern fairytale style story about 3 sisters) - 3/5 - The Manor of Lost Time (a summoned demon tells her story) - 3/5 - Cimmeria (a group of friends imagine a whole country & culture into existence) - 3/5 - Petard (Interesting content, indulgent writing style, but just about pulls it off) - 3/5 - Sleeper (a simulation of a man is created and talked to by the author of his biography) - 3/5 - The Grand Leap (a Jewish man deals with his daughter's cancer by creating a robotic "golem" of her) - 3/5 - Witch, Beast, Saint (well written, questionable content) - 3/5 - Collateral (a cyborg has to redefine ethics & morals) - 2/5 - Drones Don't Kill People (the drones become sentient) - 2/5 - Invisible Planets - 2/5 - Selfie (the usual story of a robot clone) - 2/5 - Wine - 2/5 - A Guide to the Fruits of Hawai'i (vampires rule the world, have brothels where they feed on humans) - 2/5 - Someday (a girl chooses 3 fathers for her child) - 2/5 - The Wild & Hungry Times (some sort of post-apocalyptic, fantasy story) - 2/5 - A Better Way To Die (a man battles against a younger version of himself from an alternate timeline) - 2/5 - The Instructive Tale of the Archaeologist and His Wife (in the future, there's a massive archaeological coverup, hiding our history and planting a fake history in the soil) - 2/5 - The Hand is Quicker (dystopian future, where everything has a virtual "skin") - 2/5 - Pernicious Romance (such a great title. A "love bomb" goes off at a stadium, causing everyone in the blast radius to fall asleep and have wet dreams, essentially) - 1/5 - I Can See Right Through You (indulgent, poor writing, essentially a ghost story, about an aging actor) - 1/5 - Every Hill Ends with Sky (poor, apocalypse writing) - 1/5 - Trademark Bugs (written in the style of a legal document, just too boring to enjoy) - 1/5 - Aberration (people document the past) - 1/5 - Sadness (an alien race rules the earth)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lynnet

    My thoughts on this can best be summarized in one word- "meh". None of the stories in this collection seemed to have anything new or unique to say, an impression which was reinforced by the presence of two stories, Sandra McDonald's Selfie and Rachel Swirsky's Grand Jete (the Great Leap) on the same, not particularly original topic, neither of which had much to add to the theme. Both are well written, good stories, and are singled out only because their similarity renders them symptomatic of the My thoughts on this can best be summarized in one word- "meh". None of the stories in this collection seemed to have anything new or unique to say, an impression which was reinforced by the presence of two stories, Sandra McDonald's Selfie and Rachel Swirsky's Grand Jete (the Great Leap) on the same, not particularly original topic, neither of which had much to add to the theme. Both are well written, good stories, and are singled out only because their similarity renders them symptomatic of the larger issue of this collection. To Mr. Horton's credit, there are few bad stories in the collection. Most of the stories are solidly constructed and well written. They just don't seem to have anything to say.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ben Rand

    There were a few stories in here that were quite good. But too many were not interesting.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mihkel Samarüütel

    Derek Künsken “Schools of Clay” 3/10 K. J. Parker ”Heaven Thunders the Truth” 5/10 Sandra McDonald “Selfie” 4/10 Richard Parks “The Manor of Lost Time” 5/10 Sofia Samatar “How to Get Back to the Forest” 4/10 Yoon Ha Lee “Wine” 3/10 Robert Reed “Every Hill Ends with Sky” 5/10 Damien Ober “The Endless Sink” 4/10 Alaya Dawn Johnson “A Guide to the Fruits of Hawai'i” 4/10 John Grant “Ghost Story” 6/10 Charlie Jane Anders ”Break! Break! Break!” 5/10 Kathleen Jennings “Skull and Hyssop” 6/10 Annalee Newitz “Dron Derek Künsken “Schools of Clay” 3/10 K. J. Parker ”Heaven Thunders the Truth” 5/10 Sandra McDonald “Selfie” 4/10 Richard Parks “The Manor of Lost Time” 5/10 Sofia Samatar “How to Get Back to the Forest” 4/10 Yoon Ha Lee “Wine” 3/10 Robert Reed “Every Hill Ends with Sky” 5/10 Damien Ober “The Endless Sink” 4/10 Alaya Dawn Johnson “A Guide to the Fruits of Hawai'i” 4/10 John Grant “Ghost Story” 6/10 Charlie Jane Anders ”Break! Break! Break!” 5/10 Kathleen Jennings “Skull and Hyssop” 6/10 Annalee Newitz “Drones Don't Kill People” 4/10 Kelly Link “I Can See Right Through You” 5/10 Cory Doctorow “Petard: A Tale of Just Deserts” 4/10 Patricia Russo “The Wild And Hungry Times” 4/10 Paul Cornell “A Better Way to Die” 5/10 Alexander Jablokov “The Instructive Tale of the Archeologist and His Wife” 4/10 Benjamin Rosenbaum “Fift & Shria” 5/10 Tom Crosshill “The Magician and Laplace's Demon” 5/10 Elizabeth Bear “The Hand is Quicker” 5/10 Jo Walton “Sleeper” 5/10 Robert Reed “Pernicious Romance” 5/10 C. S. E. Cooney “Witch, Beast, Saint: an Erotic Fairy Tale” 6/10 Genevieve Valentine “Aberration” 2/10 Timons Esaias “Sadness” 5/10 Eleanor Arnason “The Scrivener” 7/10 Hannu Rajaniemi “Invisible Planets” 3/10 Ken Liu “THE LONG HAUL from the ANNALS OF TRANSPORTATION, The Pacific Monthly, May 2009” 6/10 James Patrick Kelly “Someday” 6/10 Theodora Goss “Cimmeria: From The Journal of Imaginary Anthropology” 7/10 Adam Roberts “Trademark Bugs: A Legal History” 6/10 Rachel Swirsky “Grand Jete (The Great Leap)” 4/10 Peter Watts “Collateral” 5/10

  10. 5 out of 5

    Louis Lamoureux

    An anthology, there are good stories and mediocre stories inside. Some were groundbreaking while others seemed derivative. Patricia Russo's story "The Wild and Hungry Times" was one of several in a "documentary" style. Like most stories in this book, the author constructed an imaginative world, only to saddle it with a mediocre plot. "Trademark Bugs: A Legal History" by Adam Roberts starts off with the kind of legalese/business speak (including copious footnotes) that makes me seriously consider An anthology, there are good stories and mediocre stories inside. Some were groundbreaking while others seemed derivative. Patricia Russo's story "The Wild and Hungry Times" was one of several in a "documentary" style. Like most stories in this book, the author constructed an imaginative world, only to saddle it with a mediocre plot. "Trademark Bugs: A Legal History" by Adam Roberts starts off with the kind of legalese/business speak (including copious footnotes) that makes me seriously consider skipping it and threatened to put me to sleep while reading. IMO, fiction should not read like a deed or a divorce decree. With that said, the story was groundbreaking. There were several typos and missing articles.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Short stories are, by their nature, a mixed bag. That's part of why I love them. A good collection of short stories will cover a variety of topics and ideas, and sci-fi/fantasy stories make for great collections. As usual, these stories say a lot more about when they were written than any vision of the future or the past. Several were intentionally technical and complicated, which probably will not hold up well over time. This is an excellent collection of modern speculative fiction, and I liked Short stories are, by their nature, a mixed bag. That's part of why I love them. A good collection of short stories will cover a variety of topics and ideas, and sci-fi/fantasy stories make for great collections. As usual, these stories say a lot more about when they were written than any vision of the future or the past. Several were intentionally technical and complicated, which probably will not hold up well over time. This is an excellent collection of modern speculative fiction, and I liked most of the stories, loved several of them, and only disliked one or two. That's high praise in my mind.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    strong collection demonstrating that short-form science fiction is still alive and well. lots of favorites, only a few i didn't care for. definitely disliked the hacker wish fulfillment, even if it was intended to be ironic. and maybe a few too many metafictional exercises (legal proceedings don't work terribly well as fiction, the invisible cities pastiche was too obvious for me) but even those were largely successful. and i particularly enjoyed the opening story, which imagined marxist revolut strong collection demonstrating that short-form science fiction is still alive and well. lots of favorites, only a few i didn't care for. definitely disliked the hacker wish fulfillment, even if it was intended to be ironic. and maybe a few too many metafictional exercises (legal proceedings don't work terribly well as fiction, the invisible cities pastiche was too obvious for me) but even those were largely successful. and i particularly enjoyed the opening story, which imagined marxist revolution among a species so alien it wasn't really possible to picture them clearly.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This was a solid collection of stories. There were maybe three that I didn't care for at all, and about half a dozen that I loved. I enjoyed most of the selection, and I thought there was certainly a nice mix of stories, from literary to straightforward prose, from stories that barely had any speculative element to hard sf. Recommended for those who enjoy a mix of short speculative fiction. This was a solid collection of stories. There were maybe three that I didn't care for at all, and about half a dozen that I loved. I enjoyed most of the selection, and I thought there was certainly a nice mix of stories, from literary to straightforward prose, from stories that barely had any speculative element to hard sf. Recommended for those who enjoy a mix of short speculative fiction.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gareth

    A good collection, with some great writers and a couple of really impressive stories (the Peter Watts one and Rachel Swirsky's, for instance). But it took me a long time to get through, which is unusual for me, and it never really clicked - I didn't have that urge to see what the next story would be. A good collection, with some great writers and a couple of really impressive stories (the Peter Watts one and Rachel Swirsky's, for instance). But it took me a long time to get through, which is unusual for me, and it never really clicked - I didn't have that urge to see what the next story would be.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Florin Constantinescu

    Another attempt to make something good out of 'annus horribilis' 2014. When Dozois' anthology contained mostly junk, I thought maybe Horton's contains something extra. Neah! With only three standouts (the Parks, the Reed, and the Goss) - and these being of the rather short 'short story' type, and 4 or 5 unreadable, unfinishable stories, this cannot receive more than one star. Another attempt to make something good out of 'annus horribilis' 2014. When Dozois' anthology contained mostly junk, I thought maybe Horton's contains something extra. Neah! With only three standouts (the Parks, the Reed, and the Goss) - and these being of the rather short 'short story' type, and 4 or 5 unreadable, unfinishable stories, this cannot receive more than one star.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura Walton Allen

    This was't my favorite edition; last year's was much better. The overall aesthetic is somewhat odd...maybe "petty" and "callow" might be descriptors? There are a couple of standout stories, but as a whole, this one wasn't quite not a disappointment. This was't my favorite edition; last year's was much better. The overall aesthetic is somewhat odd...maybe "petty" and "callow" might be descriptors? There are a couple of standout stories, but as a whole, this one wasn't quite not a disappointment.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David R. Scott III

    Some repeats Otherwise mostly comprehensible, some classic authors, enough to occupy an afternoon. I really did like the one about the lifecycle using time.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark Catalfano

    I liked "Heaven Thunders the Truth" by K. J. Parker and "Selfie" by Sandra McDonald I liked "Heaven Thunders the Truth" by K. J. Parker and "Selfie" by Sandra McDonald

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Ann Coker

    Solid SF Excellent and varied collection...showcases the talents of both new and veteran authors. I'd recommend this edition to any lover of good science fiction and fantasy. Solid SF Excellent and varied collection...showcases the talents of both new and veteran authors. I'd recommend this edition to any lover of good science fiction and fantasy.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Chaplin

    Lots of good names in this one. Lots of thought provoking stories. See the updates I wrote.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gary Pilkington

    A nice collection of stories. Some good, some not so good but overall it was enjoyable.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Klaus Varias

    Some nice storys, highlights: "Drohnes dont kill people", and the one from Doctorow and Watts. Almost no filler. Some nice storys, highlights: "Drohnes dont kill people", and the one from Doctorow and Watts. Almost no filler.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ralyn Longs

    Best collection of short stories I've read to date, almost all of them high-quality works with fresh ideas. Best collection of short stories I've read to date, almost all of them high-quality works with fresh ideas.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Larry Gallagher

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cory Klein

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ed

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

  30. 4 out of 5

    Zack

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