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Murder in Stained Glass (Lost Crime Classics Book 1)

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Meet Miss Trumbull, a stout talkative New Yorker with perfect manners and a passion for sleuthing. When the remains of temperamental artist, Frederick Ullathorne, are found in his own fiery kiln it looks like a ghastly murder has been committed. But with only a few bones as evidence the local police are getting nowhere fast. Can Miss Trumbull pick up the clues that the poli Meet Miss Trumbull, a stout talkative New Yorker with perfect manners and a passion for sleuthing. When the remains of temperamental artist, Frederick Ullathorne, are found in his own fiery kiln it looks like a ghastly murder has been committed. But with only a few bones as evidence the local police are getting nowhere fast. Can Miss Trumbull pick up the clues that the police are missing? Or will her interfering get her into trouble in more ways that one? "Fast paced and a lot of fun" If you like Agatha Christie then you'll love Miss Trumbull." This delightful whodunnit by Margaret Armstrong was first published in 1939. It is the first in the American Queens of Crime series from Lost Crime Classics


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Meet Miss Trumbull, a stout talkative New Yorker with perfect manners and a passion for sleuthing. When the remains of temperamental artist, Frederick Ullathorne, are found in his own fiery kiln it looks like a ghastly murder has been committed. But with only a few bones as evidence the local police are getting nowhere fast. Can Miss Trumbull pick up the clues that the poli Meet Miss Trumbull, a stout talkative New Yorker with perfect manners and a passion for sleuthing. When the remains of temperamental artist, Frederick Ullathorne, are found in his own fiery kiln it looks like a ghastly murder has been committed. But with only a few bones as evidence the local police are getting nowhere fast. Can Miss Trumbull pick up the clues that the police are missing? Or will her interfering get her into trouble in more ways that one? "Fast paced and a lot of fun" If you like Agatha Christie then you'll love Miss Trumbull." This delightful whodunnit by Margaret Armstrong was first published in 1939. It is the first in the American Queens of Crime series from Lost Crime Classics

30 review for Murder in Stained Glass (Lost Crime Classics Book 1)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂

    3.5★ Armstrong has a bright and breezy writing style and a glimpse of her real life world (Armstrong was from a wealthy background in real life and her father was a stained glass artist) I was very envious of her female gumshoe's life style (a Park Ave apartment!) & I do wish Armstrong's detective, Miss Trumbull, had made more than just this one appearance in detective fiction. Unfortunately, although Trumbull's foibles were endearing, a lot of her actions didn't make much sense. There was one he 3.5★ Armstrong has a bright and breezy writing style and a glimpse of her real life world (Armstrong was from a wealthy background in real life and her father was a stained glass artist) I was very envious of her female gumshoe's life style (a Park Ave apartment!) & I do wish Armstrong's detective, Miss Trumbull, had made more than just this one appearance in detective fiction. Unfortunately, although Trumbull's foibles were endearing, a lot of her actions didn't make much sense. There was one heart stopping moment when Trumbull realises who the murderer is though and the book is an interesting snap shot of wealthy 1930s USA. (view spoiler)[If the murderer had a motive though I missed it! (hide spoiler)] Recommended as a light, escapist read. & an interesting bit of trivia. Armstrong was a talented professional artist. She designed the cover which is beautiful, but not relevant to the book! https://wordpress.com/view/carolshess...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This is a 3.5 star read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    I enjoyed reading this classic murder mystery, which is a quick, fun read. Set in 1930s New England, it has an appealing heroine, middle-aged amateur detective Miss Harriet Trumbull. Sadly, this is the only book to star this detective, though Armstrong did write two other murder mysteries. The author's family were stained glass artists (Armstrong herself was a book designer who started writing fiction in later life), so she clearly knows her stuff and the portrayal of this world feels very authen I enjoyed reading this classic murder mystery, which is a quick, fun read. Set in 1930s New England, it has an appealing heroine, middle-aged amateur detective Miss Harriet Trumbull. Sadly, this is the only book to star this detective, though Armstrong did write two other murder mysteries. The author's family were stained glass artists (Armstrong herself was a book designer who started writing fiction in later life), so she clearly knows her stuff and the portrayal of this world feels very authentic. Despite enjoying the book, I found the plot aspect slightly disappointing, as I was able to guess the killer fairly early on (something I don't usually manage!) and also to accurately predict some plot twists - then again, maybe this is just that I've been reading too many detective stories close together lately! For anyone who wants to know more about this author, The Passing Tramp blog had an interesting article about her life and her family's art: http://thepassingtramp.blogspot.co.uk... and also a detailed, spoiler-free, review of the book: http://thepassingtramp.blogspot.co.uk...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Susan in NC

    3-3.5 stars for an interesting amateur female sleuth, a different setting, 1930s New England. I loved this “spinster’s” life! Park Avenue apartment, enough money, apparently, to go to the theater, opera, travel, have her own car, servants, wide, interesting circle of friends... Miss Trumbull is visiting a friend in a small village in the Connecticut countryside. Her friend introduces her to a talented yet temperamental glass artist named Ullathorne, who has his workshop in the village, where he p 3-3.5 stars for an interesting amateur female sleuth, a different setting, 1930s New England. I loved this “spinster’s” life! Park Avenue apartment, enough money, apparently, to go to the theater, opera, travel, have her own car, servants, wide, interesting circle of friends... Miss Trumbull is visiting a friend in a small village in the Connecticut countryside. Her friend introduces her to a talented yet temperamental glass artist named Ullathorne, who has his workshop in the village, where he produces stunning stained glass art. He rules his son and all underlings with an iron fist and a sharp tongue - a really unpleasant man. Unsurprisingly to this mystery buff, he disappears to New York City, not unusual behavior for him, apparently, but human bones are found in his firing kiln, and it appears he’s been murdered. Several characters shuffle through the crime scene before the police are called, and they seem quite buffoonish (the inspector is a real jerk, even puts his hand on Miss Trumbull’s knee at one point!) Miss T is afraid one of her friends will be suspected, so decides to investigate. She is no dummy, and comes up with several clues/connections the police seem to miss. Unlike the usual amateur working with the police, though, Miss T is not in their confidence, so not sure where they are at in their investigations - an old friend she takes somewhat into her confidence is sort of a Dr. Watson to her, but I wasn’t sure we shouldn’t include him in with the suspects (the killer in plain sight plot twist). No spoilers, but this was pleasantly enjoyable, but hardly up to an Agatha Christie standard! With the New England vibe it kind of reminded me of Charlotte MacLeod’s Sarah Kelling mysteries among the upper crust of Boston. Not nearly as humorous, but fun - I just finished it, and writing this I realize we never get some questions answered/loose ends tied up, but it was a pleasant weekend read. Read with the Reading the Detectives group.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Carolien

    3.5 stars. A Golden Age mystery by a new author to me. A clever plot and interesting characters and the author's own experience with stained glass (her father was an artist in the medium) makes for an engaging read. Loved the period detail and book cover by the author. Well worth a read. 3.5 stars. A Golden Age mystery by a new author to me. A clever plot and interesting characters and the author's own experience with stained glass (her father was an artist in the medium) makes for an engaging read. Loved the period detail and book cover by the author. Well worth a read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This mystery features independently wealthy Miss Harriet Trumbull, who goes to visit Bassett's Bridge to stay with an old schoolfriend, the eccentric Charlotte. Although Charlotte has invited her to visit, she is moody and unsociable, but Harriet enjoys the company of her young cousin, Phyllis. She is invited to Frederick Ullathorne, who has moved his glass workshop from New York, and Frederick's son, Leo, who Phyllis is in love with. Soon, of course, there is murder to contend with, when bones a This mystery features independently wealthy Miss Harriet Trumbull, who goes to visit Bassett's Bridge to stay with an old schoolfriend, the eccentric Charlotte. Although Charlotte has invited her to visit, she is moody and unsociable, but Harriet enjoys the company of her young cousin, Phyllis. She is invited to Frederick Ullathorne, who has moved his glass workshop from New York, and Frederick's son, Leo, who Phyllis is in love with. Soon, of course, there is murder to contend with, when bones are found in the kiln and Harriet begins to investigate, when gossip falls on those involved - including Leo and even Charlotte. Harriet has the time, and money, to follow up on clues, but generally the mystery is a little flat and the outcome a little obvious. Still, overall, Miss Trumbull is an engaging character and it is a shame that the cast of characters were not large enough to offer a greater number of suspects. Rated 3.5.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Oakes

    3.7 or thereabouts; goodreads people, you need to get your act together re book editions. Mine is NOT the kindle version, but the ISBN says it is. Arrgh. original publication date: 1939 more about plot, etc., here . Murder in Stained Glass is the opener of a new series of old titles all falling under the heading of "American Queens of Crime", issued by Pepik Books. Claire Theyers, the owner and director of this small press, has stated that "only quality fiction" that she's read and "truly enjoyed 3.7 or thereabouts; goodreads people, you need to get your act together re book editions. Mine is NOT the kindle version, but the ISBN says it is. Arrgh. original publication date: 1939 more about plot, etc., here . Murder in Stained Glass is the opener of a new series of old titles all falling under the heading of "American Queens of Crime", issued by Pepik Books. Claire Theyers, the owner and director of this small press, has stated that "only quality fiction" that she's read and "truly enjoyed makes it into the series." Bravo for her -- and good for me, since like Ms. Theyers, I am constantly on the lookout for books from authors whom, as she notes, are "long forgotten about and their stories gathering dust in bookshops and charity stores." The blurb on the back cover of this book notes that "If you like Agatha Christie then you'll love Miss Trumbull," and while this book may definitely appeal to Miss Marple fans, Miss Trumbull is a delight on her own, and certainly no elderly sleuth with a knitting bag. She is quite independent, both in terms of money and personality, and doesn't let little things like an attempt on her life or potentially dangerous situations get in her way. The novel also has one of the best twists that I must say I never saw coming -- and in this book, there are a number of potential suspects as well as a few well-placed red herrings that will keep any reader guessing. Yes, it's a bit dated but once in the mindset of the period, it became a fun, interesting and delightful read. Recommended for vintage crime readers.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

    Pleasant murder mystery set in 1930s New York and Connecticut. Frederick Ullathorne is a bad tempered man who bullies his son Leo, and a talented stained glass artist working on the important commission of a cathedral window. His disappearance days before the completion of the window is surprising, and when human bones are found in his furnace, Leo is one of the main suspects. Harriet Trumbull, a friend of the family, decides to investigate. This was an enjoyable mystery - the plot is not particu Pleasant murder mystery set in 1930s New York and Connecticut. Frederick Ullathorne is a bad tempered man who bullies his son Leo, and a talented stained glass artist working on the important commission of a cathedral window. His disappearance days before the completion of the window is surprising, and when human bones are found in his furnace, Leo is one of the main suspects. Harriet Trumbull, a friend of the family, decides to investigate. This was an enjoyable mystery - the plot is not particularly strong and leaves a few loose ends at the end, but the setting and the descriptions of the stained glass work add an interesting element to the story. It’s a light easy read, with some amusing moments and a likeable protagonist.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    A bit of a slow start initially, this book really picked up about a third of the way in, and I polished the rest of it off in an additional 2 nights. Sometimes the uber-strong female leads can be either exhausting, or too far ahead of their time to feel believable, but I quite liked Harriet Trumbull. Being intelligent and independently wealthy certainly allowed her the freedom to follow any lead or whim of fantasy, as she travels around questioning witnesses, digging up clues from the past, and A bit of a slow start initially, this book really picked up about a third of the way in, and I polished the rest of it off in an additional 2 nights. Sometimes the uber-strong female leads can be either exhausting, or too far ahead of their time to feel believable, but I quite liked Harriet Trumbull. Being intelligent and independently wealthy certainly allowed her the freedom to follow any lead or whim of fantasy, as she travels around questioning witnesses, digging up clues from the past, and generally chasing down every red herring that appears. I did guess the killer, but not a lot of the other details of the story, which made it an overall satisfying read. I will definitely be checking out if Margaret Armstrong wrote any other mysteries.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    An unusually intrepid middle-aged heroine, with the time and money to do whatever she wants, and seems to know just everyone. The police investigator is portrayed as an egotistical incompetent. A pleasant mystery and quick read. I enjoyed the short visit to Beaufort, South Carolina where I once spent a couple of days. The action starts in a small town, moves to New York, but no skyscraper is ever mentioned so why the picture on the cover?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    Miss Trumbull, a well off spinster, goes to visit Charlotte, an old schoolfriend, and gets caught up in a lot more than she expected. There's a quote at the beginning of the book that reminds me of the premise in Towards Zero by Agatha Christie: "It’s like the nursery rhyme about the old woman who milked the cow with the crumpled horn. If the weather hadn’t cleared I wouldn’t have gone to stay with Charlotte Blair; I shouldn’t have been on hand with my eyes wide open when things began to happen; Miss Trumbull, a well off spinster, goes to visit Charlotte, an old schoolfriend, and gets caught up in a lot more than she expected. There's a quote at the beginning of the book that reminds me of the premise in Towards Zero by Agatha Christie: "It’s like the nursery rhyme about the old woman who milked the cow with the crumpled horn. If the weather hadn’t cleared I wouldn’t have gone to stay with Charlotte Blair; I shouldn’t have been on hand with my eyes wide open when things began to happen; I shouldn’t have been forced to play the part of innocent bystander – a dangerous part when bullets are flying about; and as I should have known nothing about the case, except what I read in the newspapers, I couldn’t have been of the smallest use to anybody concerned. But I did go. I saw what no one else saw. Or, rather, I saw it sooner." Near Charlotte's home is the Ullathorne glass shop, which is where the legendary glass artist Frederick Ullathorne crafts his glass masterpieces. Passionate and temperamental, Ullathorne is a difficult man to get along with and has earned his share of enemies. One day he vanishes - and bones are found in the kiln. At first, one of Ullathorne's dissatisfied employees is implicated, but then suspicion falls on Ullathorne's son Leo. Miss Trumbull is determined to find who is really responsible and launches his own investigation. Margaret Armstrong is one of those writers who really should be better known. She is good at crafting an interesting, amusing, and rather humorous mystery with enough red herrings to keep me at least from figuring out who did it. I was very surprised by who the murderer was. I really wasn't expecting that.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    I did enjoy this free kindle book. I had never heard of this author, so had no idea what to expect. Fortunately, my fears were groundless, as I found the chatty style of Miss Trumbull very pleasant. Miss Trumbull is a well-heeled city dweller, who is free to come and go as she likes. She receives an invitation from an old school friend to visit her in the country. The school friend, an ardent bird-watcher, is not a particularly good friend but Miss Trumbull accepts the invitation, and finds the I did enjoy this free kindle book. I had never heard of this author, so had no idea what to expect. Fortunately, my fears were groundless, as I found the chatty style of Miss Trumbull very pleasant. Miss Trumbull is a well-heeled city dweller, who is free to come and go as she likes. She receives an invitation from an old school friend to visit her in the country. The school friend, an ardent bird-watcher, is not a particularly good friend but Miss Trumbull accepts the invitation, and finds the school friend's young cousin who is living with her, very good company. On the first walk with her friends Miss Trumbull is taken to see a glass workshop of a very famous man. From hereon the plot of the book begins. Several characters from the village are introduced now, each one seeming to have a motive for committing the murder that takes place. Miss Trumbull, who takes a dislike to the investigating officer, decides to try and solve the crime, especially when it looks like one of the people she has grown to like seems to be a prominent suspect. There was quite a lot packed into this short story, and therefore held my attention throughout.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    Old-fashioned fun here, with wonderful period detail about New York City and a small town in Connecticut. But here's what I loved about it: the writer, Margaret Armstrong, came from a family of stained-glass artists. Not only that, she was a most accomplished and successful designer of decorative book covers before WWI. If it weren't for this f-ing virus, you could go see exhibits of her work at The New York Society Library and at the Watson Library at the Met. Both are beautiful! https://www.nys Old-fashioned fun here, with wonderful period detail about New York City and a small town in Connecticut. But here's what I loved about it: the writer, Margaret Armstrong, came from a family of stained-glass artists. Not only that, she was a most accomplished and successful designer of decorative book covers before WWI. If it weren't for this f-ing virus, you could go see exhibits of her work at The New York Society Library and at the Watson Library at the Met. Both are beautiful! https://www.nysoclib.org/blog/art-boo...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ted Tayler

    "A step back in time" A whodunit set in the 1930's that slipped through the net the first time around. This made a change from the usual modern murder mystery I read, and although at times it could have used an injection of pace, overall it was an easy read. "A step back in time" A whodunit set in the 1930's that slipped through the net the first time around. This made a change from the usual modern murder mystery I read, and although at times it could have used an injection of pace, overall it was an easy read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    An intriguing story full of suspense. A quiet spinster gets involved in solving a murder. Fun read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Coplin

    Quick, easy read. Many characters are underdeveloped. Key relationships are underdeveloped. Plot is simple. Lots of red herrings. Denouncement fails to satisfactorily answer the question of why. But, all in all, an enjoyable read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    A frothy, silly mystery wherein the wealthy New York socialite amateur detective goes to extreme measures to solve a murder but comes very close to becoming one of the victims. The story revolves around a famous artist who has just finished his greatest work of stained glass. He then stages his own death to get out from under a blackmailer. It is mildly amusing, but not enough to look for others just now. This book came to my attention as part of the Lost Crime Classics Collection available from A frothy, silly mystery wherein the wealthy New York socialite amateur detective goes to extreme measures to solve a murder but comes very close to becoming one of the victims. The story revolves around a famous artist who has just finished his greatest work of stained glass. He then stages his own death to get out from under a blackmailer. It is mildly amusing, but not enough to look for others just now. This book came to my attention as part of the Lost Crime Classics Collection available from Amazon.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hastings75

    Got onto this book through the Queens of Crime list as I was looking for something like Agatha Christie - and I wasn't disappointed. Good simple narrative with all the elements of a good whodunnit - dead bodies, suspects, red herrings, elusive detectives, interfering but knowledgable "Miss Marple" type and, of course, the murderer who is not revealed until the final chapter! The only thing that was slightly lost on me was to why the murderer did what they did. I may have missed something - might h Got onto this book through the Queens of Crime list as I was looking for something like Agatha Christie - and I wasn't disappointed. Good simple narrative with all the elements of a good whodunnit - dead bodies, suspects, red herrings, elusive detectives, interfering but knowledgable "Miss Marple" type and, of course, the murderer who is not revealed until the final chapter! The only thing that was slightly lost on me was to why the murderer did what they did. I may have missed something - might have to peruse the pages again. Otherwise a very satisfying read. Will be looking for other books in the series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    This was free on Amazon and is worthwhile for fans of classic amateur detection. Fairly straightforward murder mystery which is easy to read. Interesting background of stained glass making. Not top notch but quirkily amusing in places. The names are fun, vaguely Dickensian!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)

    I wonder if the originators of Murder, She Wrote read this book back in the day. Written in 1939, it has a definite odour of Jessica Fletcher about it--the well to do spinster who shoves her way into a case no one wants her to investigate. I kept wondering just why she was allowed to push into the seats of honour at the inquest and funeral, when it was so obvious seating was short, particularly since she is an outsider. I pegged the killer about halfway through, and there was the obligatory "oh t I wonder if the originators of Murder, She Wrote read this book back in the day. Written in 1939, it has a definite odour of Jessica Fletcher about it--the well to do spinster who shoves her way into a case no one wants her to investigate. I kept wondering just why she was allowed to push into the seats of honour at the inquest and funeral, when it was so obvious seating was short, particularly since she is an outsider. I pegged the killer about halfway through, and there was the obligatory "oh this is so amusing, you really should write a book" reveal scene. One thread is left hanging, as we never find out (view spoiler)[who tried to shove her off the balcony (hide spoiler)] . I got the feeling that the style was meant to be a great deal wittier than I found it, but perhaps that's just me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    George

    #1 in the Miss Harriet Trumbull mystery series. She is a stout talkative New Yorker, in her late 40's, with perfect manners and a passion or investigating. At the invitation of Charlotte Blair, a school friend she hasn't seen in yers, Miss Trumbull travels to Bassett's Bridge, Connecticut, a small rural community, for a visit. Well known stained glass artist, Frederick Ullathorne has his studio there. He is a very temperamental artist, who treats people poorly and harshly. Not surprisingly he is #1 in the Miss Harriet Trumbull mystery series. She is a stout talkative New Yorker, in her late 40's, with perfect manners and a passion or investigating. At the invitation of Charlotte Blair, a school friend she hasn't seen in yers, Miss Trumbull travels to Bassett's Bridge, Connecticut, a small rural community, for a visit. Well known stained glass artist, Frederick Ullathorne has his studio there. He is a very temperamental artist, who treats people poorly and harshly. Not surprisingly he is found murdered in his own fiery kiln and there is any number of possible suspects. The local police are getting nowhere fast so will Miss Trumbull pick up the clues that the police are missing?

  22. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    What a great nor type book! I was not familiar with this author, however, I certainly will be very soon. Her writing is so interesting and creative. Not sure how old she is but she sure picked up on Victorian speak, actions and mannerisms! I love books and movies from that Era and a he takes you back there from the first page to the last. All the quirky characters and twists are so very fun. But the ending...WOW!!!I won't give it away but I promise it WILL blow you away! Even if you are not espec What a great nor type book! I was not familiar with this author, however, I certainly will be very soon. Her writing is so interesting and creative. Not sure how old she is but she sure picked up on Victorian speak, actions and mannerisms! I love books and movies from that Era and a he takes you back there from the first page to the last. All the quirky characters and twists are so very fun. But the ending...WOW!!!I won't give it away but I promise it WILL blow you away! Even if you are not especially into this Era or this type of mystery, try it, I think this talented author may make a convert out of you.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Estepp

    A good reminder that not all vintage mysteries are equally worth rediscovering. I'm genuinely baffled by how positive the reviews are for this one, both here on Goodreads and on a few blogs. I thought that the intrepid amateur sleuth had virtually no personality at all and was annoyingly jumping to random conclusions for no foreseeable reason, and then spend ages being virtually convinced that said conclusions were correct. Coupled with ludicrous plot points, a culprit easily guessed, and an pal A good reminder that not all vintage mysteries are equally worth rediscovering. I'm genuinely baffled by how positive the reviews are for this one, both here on Goodreads and on a few blogs. I thought that the intrepid amateur sleuth had virtually no personality at all and was annoyingly jumping to random conclusions for no foreseeable reason, and then spend ages being virtually convinced that said conclusions were correct. Coupled with ludicrous plot points, a culprit easily guessed, and an paltry motive only half-explained made for an altogether less than satisfying read, quick and easy thought it was.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn Grabas

    Excellent read. There were so many avenues to take in coming up with the solution, but, I have to say, that from the first, Farraday rubbed me wrong. At times, I strayed from him as other evidence was gleaned, but, I kept coming back to him. At what appeared to be the end, I couldn't believe that I was so wrong, until almost the very end and I was exonerated. It was him! My little grey cells hadn't deserted me. A delightful read and I heartily recommend it to any and all who like a good mystery. Excellent read. There were so many avenues to take in coming up with the solution, but, I have to say, that from the first, Farraday rubbed me wrong. At times, I strayed from him as other evidence was gleaned, but, I kept coming back to him. At what appeared to be the end, I couldn't believe that I was so wrong, until almost the very end and I was exonerated. It was him! My little grey cells hadn't deserted me. A delightful read and I heartily recommend it to any and all who like a good mystery.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Italo Italophiles

    This is a silly story. But then all the TV episodes of Murder She Wrote were silly stories, however they went by quickly, and the acting and filming was of good quality. This book is silly in the same way as the episodes, with the busybody mature woman investigating a crime, the multitude of suspects, the endearing young couple, the bizarre twists, the odd resolution with some threat to the protagonist. Reading a novel takes more time and effort than watching a TV episode, so I tired of the sill This is a silly story. But then all the TV episodes of Murder She Wrote were silly stories, however they went by quickly, and the acting and filming was of good quality. This book is silly in the same way as the episodes, with the busybody mature woman investigating a crime, the multitude of suspects, the endearing young couple, the bizarre twists, the odd resolution with some threat to the protagonist. Reading a novel takes more time and effort than watching a TV episode, so I tired of the silliness long before I got to the end.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cat Tobin

    I was looking for something in a Christie-ish vein that was nicely murdery, without all of the accompanying racism and awfulness. This...didn't scratch that itch entirely, but it's only racist against the Irish, so IDK better? If you like the Christieish "normal (incredibly privileged) person Solves Murders" kind of thing, you'll probably like this. I was looking for something in a Christie-ish vein that was nicely murdery, without all of the accompanying racism and awfulness. This...didn't scratch that itch entirely, but it's only racist against the Irish, so IDK better? If you like the Christieish "normal (incredibly privileged) person Solves Murders" kind of thing, you'll probably like this.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Starry

    Another great pre-WW2 classic mystery! (And free on Amazon Kindle) This is my reading “comfort food,” Pete this for pandemic season. The writing was good, the characters were interesting, and the mystery was satisfying. I see the author wrote others, which I will search for. Interestingly, she is better known for her beautiful art-nouveau book covers. Check them out on Wikipedia.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Arlys Veen

    This was a lovely mystery, not cozy mystery, not a thriller but a Mrs. Pollifax or Miss Markle. This is Miss Trumble, a spinster from NYC who goes to the country to visit an old school friend. In a stained glass studio bones were found in a kiln. I was completely surprised by whodunit! That’s a good book! Kindle Unlimited

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gabriela Galescu

    Weak characters Towards the end I was skipping a lot, couldn’t wait to finish this book. Characters have no depth. Plot is ok, but hard to follow when the characters involved are so forgettable. Sorry to say, but towards the end i was so bored with everything that I couldn’t care less who the murderer was.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michael McCue

    A classic mystery from the 1930s, quite enjoyable with some surprises. The author, Margaret Armstrong, lived from 1867 to 1944. She was mostly known as an illustrator and designer but she wrote several mysteries in the 30s. She was best known for being the illustrator of a field guide to wildflowers and the designer of book covers. I may be looking for some of her other works.

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