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The Pinelands Horror: The Story of the Jersey Devil

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In the autumn of 1735, Mrs. Deborah Leeds and her thirteen children experience something strange in the Pine Barrens of colonial New Jersey. Blood-curdling screams and disturbing noises are heard coming from the bedroom of Mrs. Leeds thirteenth son, Absalom. One week later, Mrs. Deborah Leeds and Absalom go missing. Isaiah, the oldest son of the Leeds family, claims that In the autumn of 1735, Mrs. Deborah Leeds and her thirteen children experience something strange in the Pine Barrens of colonial New Jersey. Blood-curdling screams and disturbing noises are heard coming from the bedroom of Mrs. Leeds thirteenth son, Absalom. One week later, Mrs. Deborah Leeds and Absalom go missing. Isaiah, the oldest son of the Leeds family, claims that Absalom transformed into a Devil in the middle of the night and took their mother with him. To find Deborah and the so-called Goat-child, Absalom, the Reverend Jeremiah Barnes journeys into the Pinelands and helps the children to find their mother. As the Reverend is searching for the Devil, all of the Leeds children are killed, one after the other—and in the most gruesome ways imaginable. Gedaliah, the strangest son, claims to know where to find the Devil and tries to tell the Reverend the truth, but the Reverend doesn’t listen and it’s only until it’s too late that he finds the Devil’s true identity—an identity that shatters his beliefs. The names, locations and incidents in this novel are roughly based on the true history of the Jersey Devil, which some have reported to see in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey.


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In the autumn of 1735, Mrs. Deborah Leeds and her thirteen children experience something strange in the Pine Barrens of colonial New Jersey. Blood-curdling screams and disturbing noises are heard coming from the bedroom of Mrs. Leeds thirteenth son, Absalom. One week later, Mrs. Deborah Leeds and Absalom go missing. Isaiah, the oldest son of the Leeds family, claims that In the autumn of 1735, Mrs. Deborah Leeds and her thirteen children experience something strange in the Pine Barrens of colonial New Jersey. Blood-curdling screams and disturbing noises are heard coming from the bedroom of Mrs. Leeds thirteenth son, Absalom. One week later, Mrs. Deborah Leeds and Absalom go missing. Isaiah, the oldest son of the Leeds family, claims that Absalom transformed into a Devil in the middle of the night and took their mother with him. To find Deborah and the so-called Goat-child, Absalom, the Reverend Jeremiah Barnes journeys into the Pinelands and helps the children to find their mother. As the Reverend is searching for the Devil, all of the Leeds children are killed, one after the other—and in the most gruesome ways imaginable. Gedaliah, the strangest son, claims to know where to find the Devil and tries to tell the Reverend the truth, but the Reverend doesn’t listen and it’s only until it’s too late that he finds the Devil’s true identity—an identity that shatters his beliefs. The names, locations and incidents in this novel are roughly based on the true history of the Jersey Devil, which some have reported to see in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey.

30 review for The Pinelands Horror: The Story of the Jersey Devil

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Maclean

    Absolute garbage. Was there even an editor? (If so, they need a new profession.) Inconsistencies abound, including gender pronouns (seriously?!). The writing style seemed weak (like a submission for a fifth-grade class assignment), and the story was absurd and predictable. I won't take the time to list all the factual errors, but I will note that matches were not invented for nearly 100 years after they were used in this book. (If I'd had a paper copy of this book, they'd certainly be used right Absolute garbage. Was there even an editor? (If so, they need a new profession.) Inconsistencies abound, including gender pronouns (seriously?!). The writing style seemed weak (like a submission for a fifth-grade class assignment), and the story was absurd and predictable. I won't take the time to list all the factual errors, but I will note that matches were not invented for nearly 100 years after they were used in this book. (If I'd had a paper copy of this book, they'd certainly be used right now.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ekel Adolf

    The Pinelands Horror: The Story of the Jersey Devil is a decent horror novella, albeit one with some major flaws and weaknesses. For example, the writing/narration style is rather flat and the characters appear, while also being flat, to act stupid on purpose, just to keep the story going on. For example: Nobody seems to think of simply leaving the place where several people have already been murdered and prefers to stay in the wilderness. Inspite of the title, there is little of the actual Jers The Pinelands Horror: The Story of the Jersey Devil is a decent horror novella, albeit one with some major flaws and weaknesses. For example, the writing/narration style is rather flat and the characters appear, while also being flat, to act stupid on purpose, just to keep the story going on. For example: Nobody seems to think of simply leaving the place where several people have already been murdered and prefers to stay in the wilderness. Inspite of the title, there is little of the actual Jersey Devil in the story, which becomes more of a generic slasher as time goes by.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Decent overall novel but needs some edits, in several scenes the author uses the wrong names to refer to characters (like in the milking scene in the barn) or changes the way he refers to characters (one character randomly is referred to by his name after 90% of the story, the only previous time his name was used is at the initial introduction). It was a fun, quick read. The flirt with 18th century style writing/sensibilities was entertaining and I felt the story was easy to follow. With some fl Decent overall novel but needs some edits, in several scenes the author uses the wrong names to refer to characters (like in the milking scene in the barn) or changes the way he refers to characters (one character randomly is referred to by his name after 90% of the story, the only previous time his name was used is at the initial introduction). It was a fun, quick read. The flirt with 18th century style writing/sensibilities was entertaining and I felt the story was easy to follow. With some flushing out of some scenes it could be a very entertaining full length thriller. It has a wonderful initial concept and overall storyline. Reminiscent of And then there were none by Agatha Christy and I read it all in one day!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Daisy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Horrible editing, there are many times where the author confuses characters and pronouns. The entire story was just horribly confusing, it went along the lines of the Jersey Devil story at first but by the end of chapter two threw it in the dirt for this strange and twisted version filled with murder, a reverend lusting over a young girl, incest, satanism and just so much more. Quick read, I wouldn’t say I recommend it to a friend but read it if you’re curious.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Everman

    Creepy! Very interesting premise, and a very creepy story! There are tons of twists and turns, and it's a page Turner. The only downside is that it didn't do much in the way of characterization. It was inconsistent with the character development, and the plot development as well. Other than that, it was a decent read. Creepy! Very interesting premise, and a very creepy story! There are tons of twists and turns, and it's a page Turner. The only downside is that it didn't do much in the way of characterization. It was inconsistent with the character development, and the plot development as well. Other than that, it was a decent read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marisa

    cryptid fan-fiction at its worst. I kept hoping it would get better, but it just read like a straight-to-dvd script, starring a washed-up action star flexing his non-existent acting chops in the role of the long-suffering Reverend. as another reviewer noted, the author couldn't keep pronouns straight, much less names. just painful. cryptid fan-fiction at its worst. I kept hoping it would get better, but it just read like a straight-to-dvd script, starring a washed-up action star flexing his non-existent acting chops in the role of the long-suffering Reverend. as another reviewer noted, the author couldn't keep pronouns straight, much less names. just painful.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Launie Buck

    The jersey devil Stupid story..... I would not waste of time reading it. Quick murders with very little plot to it. It left you wondering.... what?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael Prentice

    A great read! Botsch keeps you guessing on who or what is behind it all and he keeps a good, ominous pace. Unfortunately, it ends with something much less than a bang - that's where it lost a star. A great read! Botsch keeps you guessing on who or what is behind it all and he keeps a good, ominous pace. Unfortunately, it ends with something much less than a bang - that's where it lost a star.

  9. 5 out of 5

    bethgman

    Poorly written The story was interesting but there were many grammatical errors that distracted from the story. Not sure if it was editing or writing but not good.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeanine

    A retelling of the legend fleshed out. Decent story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Castagna

    An interesting retelling of a classic trope. Some solid writing from Botsch but a fairly predictable outcome. A decent read though.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Supinski

  13. 4 out of 5

    Heilette

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brian Rooney

  15. 4 out of 5

    Amy Amspoker

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dani Prorok

  18. 4 out of 5

    Libby Smith

  19. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Mccafferty

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brandie

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ken

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joe L. Moore

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Burns

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jason Mckinsey

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Scholl

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jayne

  29. 5 out of 5

    Janie C.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Patty P

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