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Red Hood/Arsenal, Volume 1: Open for Business

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Writer Scott Lobdell (SUPERMAN, RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS) and artist Denis Medri (SPIDER-VERSE) give you more bang for your buck in RED HOOD/ARSENAL VOL. 1: OPEN FOR BUSINESS! Jason Todd: a former dead Robin turned Outlaw. Roy Harper: a self-destructive tech guru whose perfect aim falters when it comes to alcohol, women and finances. Alone, they've fallen on hard times. Tog Writer Scott Lobdell (SUPERMAN, RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS) and artist Denis Medri (SPIDER-VERSE) give you more bang for your buck in RED HOOD/ARSENAL VOL. 1: OPEN FOR BUSINESS! Jason Todd: a former dead Robin turned Outlaw. Roy Harper: a self-destructive tech guru whose perfect aim falters when it comes to alcohol, women and finances. Alone, they've fallen on hard times. Together…well, they're still falling on hard times. With the Outlaws disbanded, Red Hood and Arsenal go into business for themselves—first as on-staff outlaws for mysterious "fixer" Tara Battleworth, then as freelance problem solvers. Unfortunately for them, business is literally booming after a jolting "job interview" with Underbelly, a seemingly invincible crime boss who claims to have a hand in the corruption running through every major city on Earth. Traveling to Gotham City to root out society's Underbelly, the armed brothers-in-arms must also contend with a techno-suited Batman that's unfamiliar to Jason, and the Hero Manifesto, a villainous organization looking to follow Red Hood and Arsenal's business model by eliminating the competition. The duo even earns a bonus: facing the self-proclaimed offspring of Gotham City's greatest mass murderer. Collecting: Red Hood/Arsenal #1-6 and DC Sneak Peek: Red Hood/Arsenal #1.


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Writer Scott Lobdell (SUPERMAN, RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS) and artist Denis Medri (SPIDER-VERSE) give you more bang for your buck in RED HOOD/ARSENAL VOL. 1: OPEN FOR BUSINESS! Jason Todd: a former dead Robin turned Outlaw. Roy Harper: a self-destructive tech guru whose perfect aim falters when it comes to alcohol, women and finances. Alone, they've fallen on hard times. Tog Writer Scott Lobdell (SUPERMAN, RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS) and artist Denis Medri (SPIDER-VERSE) give you more bang for your buck in RED HOOD/ARSENAL VOL. 1: OPEN FOR BUSINESS! Jason Todd: a former dead Robin turned Outlaw. Roy Harper: a self-destructive tech guru whose perfect aim falters when it comes to alcohol, women and finances. Alone, they've fallen on hard times. Together…well, they're still falling on hard times. With the Outlaws disbanded, Red Hood and Arsenal go into business for themselves—first as on-staff outlaws for mysterious "fixer" Tara Battleworth, then as freelance problem solvers. Unfortunately for them, business is literally booming after a jolting "job interview" with Underbelly, a seemingly invincible crime boss who claims to have a hand in the corruption running through every major city on Earth. Traveling to Gotham City to root out society's Underbelly, the armed brothers-in-arms must also contend with a techno-suited Batman that's unfamiliar to Jason, and the Hero Manifesto, a villainous organization looking to follow Red Hood and Arsenal's business model by eliminating the competition. The duo even earns a bonus: facing the self-proclaimed offspring of Gotham City's greatest mass murderer. Collecting: Red Hood/Arsenal #1-6 and DC Sneak Peek: Red Hood/Arsenal #1.

30 review for Red Hood/Arsenal, Volume 1: Open for Business

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (B) 75% | More than Satisfactory Notes: Fun, frivolous fluff, it's silly sketch-show stuff, preposterous, yes, but nevertheless, it's painless and pleasing enough. (B) 75% | More than Satisfactory Notes: Fun, frivolous fluff, it's silly sketch-show stuff, preposterous, yes, but nevertheless, it's painless and pleasing enough.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Just a continuation of Red Hood and the Outlaws without Starfire. Red Hood and Arsenal decide to become heroes for hire, except now they are a pair of bungling idiots. If you forgot that Roy is an idiot inventor / alcoholic or that Red Hood is a former Robin, don't worry, Lobdell will remind you several times per issue. I'm not really sure why this guy keeps getting work. He's a hack writer. Received an advance copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Just a continuation of Red Hood and the Outlaws without Starfire. Red Hood and Arsenal decide to become heroes for hire, except now they are a pair of bungling idiots. If you forgot that Roy is an idiot inventor / alcoholic or that Red Hood is a former Robin, don't worry, Lobdell will remind you several times per issue. I'm not really sure why this guy keeps getting work. He's a hack writer. Received an advance copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    I received a preview eARC of this title from the publisher through NetGalley. Yeah, so my only experience with Roy Harper was the version of him on Arrow, and I'm still binging that to get caught up. So I see he has a new title, partnered up with one of the former Robins, Jason Todd. Great! I'm actually thinking it will be great to see Red Hood break away from Green Arrow and get his own action going.. Except. I was confused. Based on the above exposure, I somehow thought Roy was Red Hood. Becaus I received a preview eARC of this title from the publisher through NetGalley. Yeah, so my only experience with Roy Harper was the version of him on Arrow, and I'm still binging that to get caught up. So I see he has a new title, partnered up with one of the former Robins, Jason Todd. Great! I'm actually thinking it will be great to see Red Hood break away from Green Arrow and get his own action going.. Except. I was confused. Based on the above exposure, I somehow thought Roy was Red Hood. Because well, he wears a red hoodie on Arrow. Silly me to assume that. Now, as I said I'm not caught up, so no spoilers if the Arsenal thing happens or doesn't happen on the show. So Roy Harper is Arsenal, wearing a red outfit and toting a bunch of arrows. Alright, I had the idea right, just the name flipped. The Red Hood is actually the other dude wearing a red outfit. But see, this one has a bat on his chest. Makes sense, since he's a former Batman sidekick. Anyway, once I got over this confusion there is the further confusion of the fact that though this thing says "Volume 1" on the cover, it's a new chapter in an already established partnership between Roy Harper and Jason Todd. They were former members of a band of outlaw superheros called, well, The Outlaws. Fine. I can ride with it. Once I got acclimated to our heroes, I had to get used to their odd banter. And then, I found myself enjoying it. I was skeptical after the first issue or two, but by about halfway I decided I liked the story. The characters are funny enough, and the villains are as well. And then there is an appearance by....well, just going into it can be spoilery, and I don't want to do that. Let's just say that it's enough to make me interested in reading Volume 2.

  4. 4 out of 5

    RationalLogic

    When DC launched its awkwardly titled DCYou initiative, the publishing company promised creative and bold new directions with genre diversity and creator-driven titles, offering readers of all demographics something new and fresh to add to their shelves. Red Hood/Arsenal, it appears, seems to have missed that memo. Instead, it's a painful reminder of how low of a bar DC is willing to set in order to just keep an IP alive. Red Hood/Arsenal is a continuation of Scott Lobdell's heavily maligned Red When DC launched its awkwardly titled DCYou initiative, the publishing company promised creative and bold new directions with genre diversity and creator-driven titles, offering readers of all demographics something new and fresh to add to their shelves. Red Hood/Arsenal, it appears, seems to have missed that memo. Instead, it's a painful reminder of how low of a bar DC is willing to set in order to just keep an IP alive. Red Hood/Arsenal is a continuation of Scott Lobdell's heavily maligned Red Hood and the Outlaws, which is most notable for its reductionist portrayal of sexually liberated women early on, a controversy that drew in a lot of attention in the form of much deserved criticism from media outlets, and sales from the "ethics in videogame journalism" crowd. Since Red Hood and the Outlaws ended, the motley crew has disbanded. Starfire was fortunate enough to be passed up to one of DC's premier writing teams in a book that seems to have a better handle on the "creative and bold" promise. Jason and Roy, however, are still trapped in this title that has seemingly little purpose outside of keeping its writer employed by DC, and away from flagship titles. This title's direction is a "buddy team-up" between Jason Todd, the angsty Robin who used to be dead, and Roy Harper, an idiot "genius" who used to drink too much. Neither character exhibits much in the way of characterization outside of what can fit into a few caption boxes, nor do they experience any sort of character growth. Readers who were fans of either character prior to the New 52 will be dismayed at how shallow Jason and Roy are in comparison to their previous takes, which is quite impressive given that the former is most notable for being a tattered costume on display in the Batcave. The premise, if you could call it one, has Jason and Roy being "heroes for hire". Naturally, they don't do a very good job of being heroes, or even getting hired. Really, the premise is an excuse for the duo to bumble around a number of same-looking locales so that the artist can draw splash page after splash page of our "heroes" firing guns and arrows indiscriminately while Lobdell monologues in the background over the characters' thoughts and feelings. The plot is flimsy from the start, and it doesn't help that the writer has trouble keeping track of it from issue to issue. In one embarrassing instance, a character calls our undynamic duo "outlaws" in one chapter, but is then surprised to learn that they're "outlaws" in the next. Eventually, the plot brings the boys to Gotham, for little reason other than to capitalize on a heavily promoted status quo to prop up the book's dying sales. And during the course of this book, if you ever happen to forget that Jason was a dead Robin, or that Roy was an alcoholic, have no worry. The book will remind you again and again, whether through scene-disrupting monologues, or clutters of narration boxes littered throughout the page. And of course, all of the dialogue is written with the same sarcastic and passive-aggressive tone all throughout. Of course, if you had trouble figuring out that the dialogue is being sarcastic, the writer will conveniently tell you. Every single time. Not helping is the bland but tolerable artwork of Denis Medri, whose static splash pages seem to serve little purpose other than to conceal the lack of content in Lobdell's scripts, or to make room for the incessant narration boxes. All in all, it's safe to say that Red Hood/Arsenal is dead on arrival. At its best, it's just a representation of the low-standard, lifeless mediocrity that too many cape comics often fall into, and a reminder that bad writers can still get work in comics if they know the right people. At its worst, it's an overpriced manual on how to not write fiction for any medium. Anyone in the market for a Bat-related book that actually fulfills the "creative and bold" promise should take a look at the likes of Grayson, Robin: Son of Batman, Catwoman, or even the well-meaning but clumsily executed Batgirl. This bird, on the other hand, is better off back in the ground.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lost Planet Airman

    Meh. Despite the humor -- ranging from pratfalls to satire -- the action and the bright 'splodies, this volume didn't grip me. The motivation of heros and villains alike seemed... off, but I am not sure why. Anyway, after The Outlaws broke up and Kory (Starfire) left the planet, Roy Harper (Aresnal) needed some distraction. And what better than hero-ing with his old buddy Red Hood? Of course Roy needs some pocket money for all those trick arrows, so he's going to really put "business" into the "h Meh. Despite the humor -- ranging from pratfalls to satire -- the action and the bright 'splodies, this volume didn't grip me. The motivation of heros and villains alike seemed... off, but I am not sure why. Anyway, after The Outlaws broke up and Kory (Starfire) left the planet, Roy Harper (Aresnal) needed some distraction. And what better than hero-ing with his old buddy Red Hood? Of course Roy needs some pocket money for all those trick arrows, so he's going to really put "business" into the "heroing business". Call (view spoiler)[ seriously, it's gonna be a spoiler if you read this without the context of the comic book first (view spoiler)[ Alright then, it's your own lookout (view spoiler)[ 1-555-RED-ARSE (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)] for all your hero needs!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne

    Starfire has branched out on her own (sadly becoming a harley quinn clone, read one issue of that mess and just couldn't it was horrific.) Leaving Todd & Harper to set up rent-a-bat, which was so funny but after the third issue it becomes forgotten about which kinda sucked, because unfortunately we had to drag in that shitty ass batman amnesia storyline. However it's not really the story that makes this good it's Todd & Harper are just adorable, their constant bickering it hilarious and they're Starfire has branched out on her own (sadly becoming a harley quinn clone, read one issue of that mess and just couldn't it was horrific.) Leaving Todd & Harper to set up rent-a-bat, which was so funny but after the third issue it becomes forgotten about which kinda sucked, because unfortunately we had to drag in that shitty ass batman amnesia storyline. However it's not really the story that makes this good it's Todd & Harper are just adorable, their constant bickering it hilarious and they're pretty much an old married couple by this point. To be fair i'd read them doing any ol' shit i'm just red hood and arsenal trash at this point so others may rate this not as high it really depends on whether you think these two idiots are funny some will love this more than others. However, and this is a big one i was gonna give this five stars even with the shitty batman cross over (and yeah the todd/bruce hug was cute but it's been done!) But they introduced the worst character ever in the history of character creation and they let this character join their team, like what the shitting ever loving fuck were they thinking??? Can this character just leave they keep trying to shoe horn this character in everywhere the suicide squad didnt even want them, and they'll have any old shit!! So nah son, i hope they get rid of this character fast but i doubt it, the next volume is definitely gonna be shit tinted now, thanks for that. Other than that, still giving it four stars because up til issue 6 i really enjoyed it and it's definitely worth picking up as long as you like these characters otherwise it's not worth it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anna Kay

    It would've been a star more, because I highly enjoyed the vast majority of the volume. But the new third member of the team was: a) One of my least favorite DC characters ever AND b) Was somebody a Bat-family member (even a former one) would NEVER work with!!!!! Just, ugh. What the heck were they smoking?! It would've been a star more, because I highly enjoyed the vast majority of the volume. But the new third member of the team was: a) One of my least favorite DC characters ever AND b) Was somebody a Bat-family member (even a former one) would NEVER work with!!!!! Just, ugh. What the heck were they smoking?!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ivy

    5 🌟 Red Hood and Arsenal start their own business and get their first client. They also have Joker's Daughter join the team. 5 🌟 Red Hood and Arsenal start their own business and get their first client. They also have Joker's Daughter join the team.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nikki in Niagara

    Not very impressed. I like Red Hood because of his angst and darkness and in this new Vol. 1, he's undergone a character assassination that I don't care for at all. He also appears younger, uglier and has a horrible new haircut. Roy is usually a fun character; here he's just a younger jerk. Not liking these two new versions at all. Good thing for newcomers coming to a volume 1 though, is that everyone is introduced as if you had never heard of them before. We are told Jason used to be a Robin ov Not very impressed. I like Red Hood because of his angst and darkness and in this new Vol. 1, he's undergone a character assassination that I don't care for at all. He also appears younger, uglier and has a horrible new haircut. Roy is usually a fun character; here he's just a younger jerk. Not liking these two new versions at all. Good thing for newcomers coming to a volume 1 though, is that everyone is introduced as if you had never heard of them before. We are told Jason used to be a Robin over and over, ad nauseum. The book may start off with Jason and Roy teaming-up as a duo but by the end, they add a third partner again, with an unbelievable choice and one of my least favourite characters. The story isn't very strong either with a newly made rag-tag group of minor villains and an amnesia batman/robot batman episode.

  10. 4 out of 5

    shayla

    i really liked this. jay and roy are my husbands so i love most things they’re in and i absolutely love their dynamic and always have but i love their dynamic in this especially. i also like jokers daughter a lot too so i’ll probably get the next one just to see where it goes.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Louis Skye

    This was fun. I admit I have read very little of Red Hood and Arsenal so I haven't got much to go by but these two are a fun pair to hang out with. Lots of banter and hilarious one-liners; the humour is great and I really enjoyed it. The story was alright. I felt like it was wrapped up a bit too easily but it's fine. Anything more convoluted probably wouldn't have worked in a 6-issue series. Looking forward to reading more with these two. This was fun. I admit I have read very little of Red Hood and Arsenal so I haven't got much to go by but these two are a fun pair to hang out with. Lots of banter and hilarious one-liners; the humour is great and I really enjoyed it. The story was alright. I felt like it was wrapped up a bit too easily but it's fine. Anything more convoluted probably wouldn't have worked in a 6-issue series. Looking forward to reading more with these two.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Diana Ramos

    I started to read this because I want to get on with Rebirth but I knew I couldn't skip this (maybe I could??) I really like the interaction between Roy and Jason 💖 they are like brothers/best-friends. It was a really fun volume and I'll be reading the next soon. (The one thing I did not like was Jason missing his iconic white piece of hair!!) I started to read this because I want to get on with Rebirth but I knew I couldn't skip this (maybe I could??) I really like the interaction between Roy and Jason 💖 they are like brothers/best-friends. It was a really fun volume and I'll be reading the next soon. (The one thing I did not like was Jason missing his iconic white piece of hair!!)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    After going their separate ways in the final issue of Red Hood and the Outlaws, Jason Todd as Red Hood and Roy Harper as Arsenal are reunited for more hijinks and shenanigans. This trade paperback collects the first six issues of the 2015 on-going series and the DC Sneak Peek into the DCYou phase incarnation of the New 52. Red Hood/Arsenal: Open for Business opens up with the DC Sneak Peek short that introduced the series from the Convergence crossover event. Written by Scott Lobdell and penciled After going their separate ways in the final issue of Red Hood and the Outlaws, Jason Todd as Red Hood and Roy Harper as Arsenal are reunited for more hijinks and shenanigans. This trade paperback collects the first six issues of the 2015 on-going series and the DC Sneak Peek into the DCYou phase incarnation of the New 52. Red Hood/Arsenal: Open for Business opens up with the DC Sneak Peek short that introduced the series from the Convergence crossover event. Written by Scott Lobdell and penciled by Denis Medri we have Jason Todd and Roy Harper going undercover as Kobra operatives to stop their nefarious plan to blow up the city above. It's a straightforward story, with somewhat good illustration, but a good introduction to a new series. The on-going series has Red Hood and Arsenal breaking away from Tara Battleworth's company and opening up their own mercenary business. Their advertisement is totally hilarious – a gigantic billboard which reads: "Rent-A-Bat – Call Now! (555) RED-ARSE". (On a side note, RedArse would be the perfect portmanteau power couple name if the two ever got together romantically). One of their first clients is a mobster named Underbelly who resides in Gotham City. Things has changed in Gotham City since Jason Todd has been there last – firstly there's a new Batman in town with a gigantic robot suit and not too pleased to see Jason Todd and Roy Harper within the city limits. Then there is Bruce Wayne, who has totally forgotten that he was Batman, their meeting outside the community center was written and depicted well, if not extremely awkward. The trade paperback ends with the duo meeting the Joker's Daughter and them returning to Gotham City to face the events that would lead to the Robin War. Lobdell writing, for the most part, was written rather well. It can be verbose at time and the speech bubble placement could be difficult to read during these long-winded moments. It could also be difficult to find out who is say what during the witty banter moments. In the end, the writing is nothing revolutionary or different than his Outlaws series – it's just one person short. In fact, this could be a continuation of the previous Red Hood and the Outlaws series, just because Starfire left the team, doesn't mean that they aren’t still outlaws and there is no real need to start a new series. Except for one issue (Red Hood/Arsenal #2) Denis Medri serves as main penciler for this series. For the most part, Medri penciling is somewhat good – I’m just not a great aficionado of his work. I really don’t like the new Red Hood design of ditching the leather jacket for a sleeveless hoodie with a red bat emblem – it just seems like a step backward in the design and not as cool looking of his previous uniform. Paolo Pantalena who penciled the second issue has a slightly cartoonish tinge with some pastels overtones, which created a look that I rather liked. All in all, Red Hood/Arsenal: Open for Business is a somewhat good beginning for the series. In truth, it just feels like a continuation of Red Hood and the Outlaws, but under a new title. Thankfully, the series secured a stable penciler – I just wished it was one that I liked more. In any case, I'm still going to continue with this series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cale

    So apparently Starfire is too high class now, and can't be bothered to hang out with Red Hood and Arsenal any more. After their adventures in this Rebirth volume, I can't really blame her. The two bumble their way through random assassinations and new villains that are weirdly anticlimactic. Take Underbelly, an entity powered by corruption who exists across the country/world - this guy who should in theory be a massive presence in the DC universe instead lasts for maybe three issues and then get So apparently Starfire is too high class now, and can't be bothered to hang out with Red Hood and Arsenal any more. After their adventures in this Rebirth volume, I can't really blame her. The two bumble their way through random assassinations and new villains that are weirdly anticlimactic. Take Underbelly, an entity powered by corruption who exists across the country/world - this guy who should in theory be a massive presence in the DC universe instead lasts for maybe three issues and then gets destroyed by some random Roy Harper tech. And then there's another antagonist who is somehow reviving dead villains related to the two (it's never explained how) for an idiotic purpose. And a couple issues go to Gotham to face the new Batman (at least it has a couple sweet moments), and apparently gain a new third. Oh, and the art is weird - our protagonists look like they're maybe in their late teens on occasion. It's not as bad as the previous volume, but it is somewhat distracting. If this is an indication of where the series is headed, I'll stop right here.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    2.5 Stars I really love Red Hood and Arsenal in most of their incarnations, but this comic fell flat for me. After the Outlaws falls apart, Roy and Jason form their own partnership to look out for one another. Generally, all of their interactions are full of banter that felt a little too stiff. Any moments for character growth are rushed or glossed over too quickly. I think this happened because several spreads of every issue retread the same ground. It went over the fact that Jason Todd was 2.5 Stars I really love Red Hood and Arsenal in most of their incarnations, but this comic fell flat for me. After the Outlaws falls apart, Roy and Jason form their own partnership to look out for one another. Generally, all of their interactions are full of banter that felt a little too stiff. Any moments for character growth are rushed or glossed over too quickly. I think this happened because several spreads of every issue retread the same ground. It went over the fact that Jason Todd was a formerly dead Robin and Arsenal is some form of stupid genius who broke away from Green Arrow at the start of every issue. Then we got a summary of sorts of the events of the last issue. It didn't leave much time at all for new story.Also, what is up with that art in the first issue? Why did Jason look more like Bluebird than himself? Why did Roy have crazy Joker face?P.S. When your characters start pointing out that death has no stakes and it's no reason to get upset over, you know you have problems.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    3.5 Stars This must be the buddy comedy book of the DCU. (I'm still chuckling from "Rent-A-Bat! Dial 1-800-RED-ARSE" LOL After the departure of Kori (see Starfire Vol. 1 by Amanda Conner), Roy and Jason have also separated. A job brings them together, hijinks ensue, and a new villain is discovered: Underbelly, a creature made from the essences of the evil inmates of Arkham (backstory involves a murder by Joker). Tracking it to Gotham, our two heroes collide with the new Batman, who gives them a pa 3.5 Stars This must be the buddy comedy book of the DCU. (I'm still chuckling from "Rent-A-Bat! Dial 1-800-RED-ARSE" LOL After the departure of Kori (see Starfire Vol. 1 by Amanda Conner), Roy and Jason have also separated. A job brings them together, hijinks ensue, and a new villain is discovered: Underbelly, a creature made from the essences of the evil inmates of Arkham (backstory involves a murder by Joker). Tracking it to Gotham, our two heroes collide with the new Batman, who gives them a pass once he realizes how much they are helping. Enter Joker's Daughter, who is trying to turn over a new leaf and be a hero. She wants to join up with Red Hood and Arsenal, and does at the end of the Volume. Ultimately, everything about this title is OK, nothing great, but not horrible. I'll read Volume 2, so that I know where our characters end up for Rebirth. Recommend, but only for fans of Red Hood and the Outlaws.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

    i love Jason Todd and Roy Harper two of my favourite vigilantes Red Hood and Arsenal both former students of Batman and the Green Arrow together they team up and start a fresh new life without their overbearing mentor figures a highly entertaining series a definite must read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    SimplyCifer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It's like Scott Lobdell completely forgot about the previous story. Both Red Hood and Arsenal are just caricatures of who they are, even in comparison to Red Hood and the Outlaws which wasn't much better. The storytelling is a fucking mess, the writing is also a fucking mess, and the continuity between this story, the previous story, and the overarching New 52 storylines is also a fucking mess. There are a few too many things to go into to describe what's wrong but three particular issues thst a It's like Scott Lobdell completely forgot about the previous story. Both Red Hood and Arsenal are just caricatures of who they are, even in comparison to Red Hood and the Outlaws which wasn't much better. The storytelling is a fucking mess, the writing is also a fucking mess, and the continuity between this story, the previous story, and the overarching New 52 storylines is also a fucking mess. There are a few too many things to go into to describe what's wrong but three particular issues thst are most glaring are as follows. 1. Arsenal no longer has any likability and just causes problems for him and Jason to the point where Jason would be better off without him. However, Jason just goes along with it because...they're partners? He's a perfect example of Lobdell's main writing problem where he doesn't know when to stop writing. Every character just word vomits and it's trying to be silly and funny and it's just awful. 2. The final villain of the first volume is some generic evil slime creature supposedly created by the Joker sometime while Jason was Robin, specifically at an event Jason was present for. This villain makes a point of how they're so powerful they've influenced Gotham for years (along with all the other people influencing Gotham). The villain also says he's just actual evil thoughts personified. Soooo why doesn't Jason use the All-Blades from the last storyline to fight this thing instead of guns. My guess is either Scott Lobdell forgot, oooor Scott Lobdell really likes Arsenal over Red Hood. 3. This may just be because I'm reading Superheavy at the same time, but the fact that Lobdell wrote Gordon as some mad dog police officer given some mad authority with the Batsuit is just so off. Even outside of being Batman, Gordon is supposed to be the one good cop, the one who does things for the good of the people, not just "the law" as he appears to do here. He goes out of his way to harass both Red Hood and Arsenal who are trying to fight the same villain as him, but neither side is in the right. Gordon blindly wants to arrest them cause "they're outlaws" and the idiot couple shoot at him cause "you're not the real batman!". These don't get into the little details, the too silly plot and villains, repeat characters who don't need to be brought back, and it's one potentially heart warming scene being ruined by being pandering and ending off introducing a character who definitely doesn't need to be made into a hero. 2 stars is probably too kind but I feel bad for the artist who seems to at least have a unique style and knows not to draw Red Hood without nose and lips.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    2.5 stars. September 2021 reread. I remember having liked this a lot more when it was first coming out, but as it is now this is fine. Lobdell's writing seems to be rather polarizing in fan spaces, but I'm pretty neutral on it. His work is better when he's doing introspective character exploration, and best when he's punching me in my Jason Todd feelings, but less good when actual character *development* or plot needs to happen. Characters will skip straight to Point C without ever actually moving 2.5 stars. September 2021 reread. I remember having liked this a lot more when it was first coming out, but as it is now this is fine. Lobdell's writing seems to be rather polarizing in fan spaces, but I'm pretty neutral on it. His work is better when he's doing introspective character exploration, and best when he's punching me in my Jason Todd feelings, but less good when actual character *development* or plot needs to happen. Characters will skip straight to Point C without ever actually moving through Point B, etc. As a result, I would happily read an entire book of Jason and Roy being roomies, but care not at all about anything that actually *happens* in the book we got. Denis Medri's artwork is serviceable, though there are occasional issues with clarity in action sequences. There aren't really any standout, memorable panels, but neither are there any ugly panels. So yeah. This is...mostly unobjectionable, but not exactly good either.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Monita Mohan

    What did I just read? That story and those characters made absolutely no sense? Like, it was just the same thing over and over again but with different villains. I like Jason and Roy, they’re pretty darn hilarious and their banter is to die for. But reading this volume made my brain hurt. Each issue we just careen from one villain to another and there’s nothing logical or practical about what’s going on around these characters. I wanted to like this a lot more but I don’t like the sizest attitud What did I just read? That story and those characters made absolutely no sense? Like, it was just the same thing over and over again but with different villains. I like Jason and Roy, they’re pretty darn hilarious and their banter is to die for. But reading this volume made my brain hurt. Each issue we just careen from one villain to another and there’s nothing logical or practical about what’s going on around these characters. I wanted to like this a lot more but I don’t like the sizest attitude towards the villains and what’s up with Joker’s Daughter - she has a disgusting mask on but is dressed like an anime school girl. It’s little things like that which ruined the reading experience for me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Scott Lobdell was one of my favorite writers from the 90s and I know he's capable of so much more. This was an unfortunate depiction of some very good characters in a pretty terrible plot. It was flat out bad. Uninspired and lazy. I seriously did not like this. This Roy is the worst. Almost impossible to like. The art was good except for Roy face always looking weird and the lettering was often too dark. Overall, a sad attempt at "cool" that falls flat. Scott Lobdell was one of my favorite writers from the 90s and I know he's capable of so much more. This was an unfortunate depiction of some very good characters in a pretty terrible plot. It was flat out bad. Uninspired and lazy. I seriously did not like this. This Roy is the worst. Almost impossible to like. The art was good except for Roy face always looking weird and the lettering was often too dark. Overall, a sad attempt at "cool" that falls flat.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kit

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. honestly, i'd read 100 issues of jason and roy doing dumb shit together, regardless of the quality. still, if you enjoyed rhato, i think you'll enjoy this, too. mostly i'm glad to see the continuation of the first gen. of outlaws, even if kori's absence is still felt. i'm looking forward to seeing how duela changes their dynamics as a new trio. honestly, i'd read 100 issues of jason and roy doing dumb shit together, regardless of the quality. still, if you enjoyed rhato, i think you'll enjoy this, too. mostly i'm glad to see the continuation of the first gen. of outlaws, even if kori's absence is still felt. i'm looking forward to seeing how duela changes their dynamics as a new trio.

  23. 4 out of 5

    gingey reads

    The only thing I have to say is: oh my god i cant believe jayroy is confirmed or, to quote @allonsylizabeth (Twitter), me, beating dan didio with a stick: MAKE JAYROY CANON YOU COWARDS In other news, I'm still Jason Todd loving trash and still strongly headcanon that he's deaf 👂💜 The only thing I have to say is: oh my god i cant believe jayroy is confirmed or, to quote @allonsylizabeth (Twitter), me, beating dan didio with a stick: MAKE JAYROY CANON YOU COWARDS In other news, I'm still Jason Todd loving trash and still strongly headcanon that he's deaf 👂💜

  24. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    An extra star for no Starfire to completely butcher. Falls short of three stars because of the art - I was not impressed at all.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Roy and Jason's interactions make all the difference in this book. Otherwise it would have been fairly formulaic... Roy and Jason's interactions make all the difference in this book. Otherwise it would have been fairly formulaic...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Roman Colombo

    This was really good, and for some reason that surprises me. Red Hood and Arsenal are a great buddy cop team, and their friendship could rival the likes of Luke Cage and Iron Fist.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Echoes

    Rent-a-Bat call 555-RED-ARSE omg I’m dying xD

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lexi

    3.75 for shirtless Jason.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Will Cooper

    3 and 1/2 stars! This was funny and didn't take itself seriously, so I enjoyed it. 3 and 1/2 stars! This was funny and didn't take itself seriously, so I enjoyed it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I read this graphic novel and volume 2 at the same time, so I'm going to review both at once with that book (mostly because I'm not sure I'll keep straight what happened in which volume). I read this graphic novel and volume 2 at the same time, so I'm going to review both at once with that book (mostly because I'm not sure I'll keep straight what happened in which volume).

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