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On the Graphic Novel

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A noted comics artist himself, Santiago Garcia follows the history of the graphic novel from early nineteenth-century European sequential art, through the development of newspaper strips in the United States, to the development of the twentieth-century comic book and its subsequent crisis. He considers the aesthetic and entrepreneurial innovations that established the cond A noted comics artist himself, Santiago Garcia follows the history of the graphic novel from early nineteenth-century European sequential art, through the development of newspaper strips in the United States, to the development of the twentieth-century comic book and its subsequent crisis. He considers the aesthetic and entrepreneurial innovations that established the conditions for the rise of the graphic novel all over the world. Garcia not only treats the formal components of the art, but also examines the cultural position of comics in various formats as a popular medium. Typically associated with children, often viewed as unedifying and even at times as a threat to moral character, comics art has come a long way. With such examples from around the world as Spain, France, Germany, and Japan, Garcia illustrates how the graphic novel, with its increasingly global and aesthetically sophisticated profile, represents a new model for graphic narrative production that empowers authors and challenges longstanding social prejudices against comics and what they can achieve. "


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A noted comics artist himself, Santiago Garcia follows the history of the graphic novel from early nineteenth-century European sequential art, through the development of newspaper strips in the United States, to the development of the twentieth-century comic book and its subsequent crisis. He considers the aesthetic and entrepreneurial innovations that established the cond A noted comics artist himself, Santiago Garcia follows the history of the graphic novel from early nineteenth-century European sequential art, through the development of newspaper strips in the United States, to the development of the twentieth-century comic book and its subsequent crisis. He considers the aesthetic and entrepreneurial innovations that established the conditions for the rise of the graphic novel all over the world. Garcia not only treats the formal components of the art, but also examines the cultural position of comics in various formats as a popular medium. Typically associated with children, often viewed as unedifying and even at times as a threat to moral character, comics art has come a long way. With such examples from around the world as Spain, France, Germany, and Japan, Garcia illustrates how the graphic novel, with its increasingly global and aesthetically sophisticated profile, represents a new model for graphic narrative production that empowers authors and challenges longstanding social prejudices against comics and what they can achieve. "

30 review for On the Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alberto Garcia Ariza

    Lo que menos me ha gustado es el título, porque realmente no le hace justicia. En realidad es una revisión de la historia del comic. Pero no es un texto histórico más, sino que lo hace desde el prisma de la novela gráfica, intentando rastrear sus orígenes y características para poder así definir lo indefinible. Y en esas, Santiago García aprovecha para trazar unas líneas que esbozan a modo general la historia que ya conocemos, y hace que toda su evolución quede super clara. Ah, me olvidaba. Es s Lo que menos me ha gustado es el título, porque realmente no le hace justicia. En realidad es una revisión de la historia del comic. Pero no es un texto histórico más, sino que lo hace desde el prisma de la novela gráfica, intentando rastrear sus orígenes y características para poder así definir lo indefinible. Y en esas, Santiago García aprovecha para trazar unas líneas que esbozan a modo general la historia que ya conocemos, y hace que toda su evolución quede super clara. Ah, me olvidaba. Es super ameno. No es tan pasa-páginas como el de Sean Howe, pero casi ;)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Guilherme Smee

    Este livro sensacional que explora todas as facetas do fenômeno graphic novel, faz isso de maneira peculiar. Ele explora os quadrinhos de forma histórica desde os proto-quadrinhos de Busch, Christophe, entre outros, mas sempre buscando possíveis raízes das graphic novels. Da mesma forma, diferente de muitos livros sobre a história da história em quadrinhos que temos por aí, Santiago García, explora essa história de um ponto de vista espanhol. Ou seja: em que o quadrinho norte-americano não é o c Este livro sensacional que explora todas as facetas do fenômeno graphic novel, faz isso de maneira peculiar. Ele explora os quadrinhos de forma histórica desde os proto-quadrinhos de Busch, Christophe, entre outros, mas sempre buscando possíveis raízes das graphic novels. Da mesma forma, diferente de muitos livros sobre a história da história em quadrinhos que temos por aí, Santiago García, explora essa história de um ponto de vista espanhol. Ou seja: em que o quadrinho norte-americano não é o centro do mundo, embora as grandes revoluções do meio tenham ocorrido por lá. García rende explicações sobre a evolução dos quadrinhos também na Europa e no Japão, os dois maiores mercados do meio (o quarto seria o Brasil). É muito bom, para nós, latinos que experimentemos da história dos quadrinhos através dos olhos de um estudioso não-yankee, porque o mercado brasileiro não se fez apenas de quadrinhos estadunidenses e muito menos foi apenas aquele país que influenciou nossos artistas da nona arte. Um ótimo livro que seria interessante ter uma versão em português.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'On the Graphic Novel' by Santiago Garcia is a serious and scholarly look at the graphic novel. The writer is a comic artist himself. The book was written a few years back, but the information is still relevant. There is a lot of semantic argument of what a graphic novel is and is not. This book sides with the more literate and underground definition, but doesn't mind including some works from the superhero side of things. I can agree with this definition for the purpose of this work. The book tak 'On the Graphic Novel' by Santiago Garcia is a serious and scholarly look at the graphic novel. The writer is a comic artist himself. The book was written a few years back, but the information is still relevant. There is a lot of semantic argument of what a graphic novel is and is not. This book sides with the more literate and underground definition, but doesn't mind including some works from the superhero side of things. I can agree with this definition for the purpose of this work. The book takes a good look at the evolution of the comic book, from woodcuts to throwaway reprints of newspaper comics to Superman and beyond. The underground comix of the late 1960s have a chapter as well as the alternative movement in the 1980s. From subversive themes to famous autobiographical works. The names discussed include R. Crumb, Chris Ware, Frank Miller, Alan Moore, and many, many others. Examples of many of the works are included in picture inserts and there is an extensive bibliography at the end of the book. As a fan of comics and graphic novels, I thoroughly enjoyed this wonderful non-fiction look at their history and place in history. I received a review copy of this ebook from University Press of Mississippi and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Powers

    Book Review by: Sharon Powers. If you would like to see this review with all the graphics, please go to Sharon's Love of Books at http://sharonsloveofbooks.blogspot.com/ __________________________________________ In middle school, I loved reading Classics Illustrated. Seeing the pictures along with the words helped me to visualize the story, making it come alive for me. But what does reading Classics Illustrated as a child have to do with Santiago Garcia's beautiful book, "On the Graphic Novel"? T Book Review by: Sharon Powers. If you would like to see this review with all the graphics, please go to Sharon's Love of Books at http://sharonsloveofbooks.blogspot.com/ __________________________________________ In middle school, I loved reading Classics Illustrated. Seeing the pictures along with the words helped me to visualize the story, making it come alive for me. But what does reading Classics Illustrated as a child have to do with Santiago Garcia's beautiful book, "On the Graphic Novel"? The connection is one most children have: the reading of comics. And, though I read Classics Illustrated, I never had the same life-like experiences that daydreamer Walter Mitty had. Nonetheless, the Classics Illustrated stories did help me to create a kind of "reality" where the stories could live. When I was ten, my parents sent me to Children's Hospital in San Francisco while the rest of my family stayed home, some three and one-half hours away--too far to drive every day to see me. I had my operation and skin graft (to my foot), and began a slow recovery--the one day visits on the weekend stretched out to one day every two weeks. Aching with loneliness day after day for many weeks, I turned to my Classics Illustrated, to occupy my mind and to keep my spirits up. I gratefully accepted the titles my folks would bring when they visited me. This particular edition is a hardcover version of the classic novel, Ivanhoe, by Sir Walter Scott, adapted to Classics Illustrated. Comics and graphic novels can be the inspiration to read--reading this Classics Illustrated title inspired me to read the full novel, hardcover edition of Sir Walter Scott's Ivanhoe. [2] I loved many of those Classics Illustrated titles. Some of my favorites: The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas; The Last Days of Pompeii by Edward Bulwer-Lyton; The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells; Swiss Family Robinson by Jonathan Wyss; and The Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain. My absolute favorite of them all, though, was Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott. Looking at the book cover, on the right, here, note that the cover indicates the title as being a "Full-Color Graphic Novel Adaptation." Of course, back then, as a kid, I did not know what a "graphic novel" was. As an adult, I learned that my assumptions about what a graphic novel was were patently wrong. I sought a clear definition on-line for "graphic novel." I found that I had to glean bits and pieces of the definition from many sources to finally put together (what I thought was) a great definition. If you look back on some of my other posts, you can find that definition (of multiple parts), there. I really liked the book and all the information provided. I liked it so much that I purchased the hard- cover edition for myself. Let's take a look at Santiago Garcia's book, On the Graphic Novel, translated by Bruce Campbell, to see if we can resolve the question about the definition of graphic novel. To begin, let's examine a short synopsis of the book. SHORT SYNOPSIS: Santiago Garcia is a renowned comics artist. In this publication, Garcia traces the history of comics and the graphic novel back from its infancy and development in nineteenth-century European "sequential art." He takes us through the early beginnings of newspaper strips (in the US) all the way through the early twentieth-century evolution of the "comic book" and to its inevitable upheaval. Garcia examines both the "aesthetic" as well as the "metamorphosis" aspects that made for "the rise of the graphic novel." He lays out the "formal" elements and then takes us through the influences of the "cultural" aspects of comics and the graphic novel. He continues his exploration of this subject and shows the reader the many "formats" of the comic as a "popular medium." Two pages of the opened-up book; the pages illustrate a few of the "comics" that have been published in the past, as well as provide a text with information on the history of the comic industry as well as that of the graphic novel. Garcia states that comics are most often associated with children; even so, comics were condemned as a bad moral influence to children. Comics, at best, were seen as "unedifying" to the reading public. The material found in comics was such that no intelligent, educated, or public personage would want to pick them up to read. To show just how far the world of comics has come, Garcia provides illustrations from all over the world: Spain, France, Germany, and even Japan. Garcia uses these examples to clarify how the graphic novel has developed into its increased international profile. He also points to the graphic novel's increasingly sophisticated silhouette and how it evolved into a new type of "graphic narrative production." Moreover, the "graphic novel," is a new way of "empowering" authors. One of the very big things Garcia points out is that this new model challenges the prejudices that attached to "comics," and shows what they have yet to achieve. CELEBRATE THE FREEDOM TO READ! [3] With all that has come before in the evolution of comics and graphic novels, the comic has been condemned as unfit for children to read because it contains nothing of worth. Indeed, it has been decried as encouraging low life and moral values. Since Santiago Garcia speaks extensively throughout his book about the perception of comics and graphic novels, his book ties in perfectly with this week as BANNED BOOKS WEEK, 09-27-15 THROUGH 10-03-15. I want to take part in a great opportunity to help make the point that books in all genres, formats, philosophies, ideologies, etc. should not be banned. In one sense it is quite simple because "no one," as Lisa McMann, author of the Wake Trilogy, has said, "should have the power to decide what other people's kids may or may not read." [4] In one form or another all of us have felt the impact of books that have been the target for removal from libraries and school bookshelves across this vast nation. Take part this week and join in spreading the word about Banned Books Week (09/27-10/03/15). Please start by simply taking a moment to enjoy and share this enlightening promo from YouTube about the week ahead.[4] [6] I bring up the issue of banned books because, as author Santiago Garcia points out in his book, On the Graphic Novel, modernly graphic novels have received recognition and are viewed by some as legitimate books, containing legitimate topics and stories. Jason Heller of Entertainment Weekly, tells us that that "attention cuts both ways." He continues to explain that "[w]hile comics are now being taken seriously as literature, they're also being challenged and banned along with literature" by both private and public organizations, citizen groups, and religious communities. [5] [7] In Heller's article of 09-21-14, Heller listed a top group of important graphic novels and comics that have taken hits and have been banned by various organizations. Those top ten are as follows: (1) The Color of Earth by Dong Hwa Kim; (2) Fun Home by Alison Bechdel; (3) Bone by Jeff Smith; (4) Batman: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore and Brian Bolland; (5) Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi; (6) SideScrollers by Matthew Loux; (7) Ice Haven by Daniel Clowes; (8) Stuck Rubber Baby by Howard Cruse; (9) Maus by Art Spiegelman; and (10) Blankets by Craig Thompson. [5] The importance of how books, comics, and graphic novels are received by the public speaks to our very right to be able to choose to read whatever we wish to read. It is all about maintaining an essential freedom. Now, to continue on with that in mind, let's get on to what I think about Santiago Garcia's book, On the Graphic Novel. WHAT I THINK ABOUT SANTIAGO GARCIA'S BOOK, ON THE GRAPHIC NOVEL: At first I had assumed that Mr. Garcia would be providing a definitive defini- tion of a "graphic novel." It wasn't long until I was disabused of that notion. In the very first pages of the Preface to the American Edition, Garcia tells the reader that he is "not interested in a regular 'definition' of comics...or...the graphic novel." Wondering what the book was all about confused me; after all, the title of Garcia's work is, "On the Graphic Novel." Just a little later I read what Garcia had in- tended for us. Garcia ex- plained that he intended to show us all what the "mean- ing" of comics was to us in the past, what it means to us in the present and what it will mean to us in the future. The second part of all this is that Garcia also intended to show us how the graphic novel is connected to it all. "The Yellow Kid" (because he wore yellow gar- ments) at first, had dialogue written on his clothing--before the thought bubbles became prominent. [8] Delving into the pages of the e-book (an advance reading copy from NetGalley) I began to look at comics and graphic novels in a different light. Bringing the history of the telling of stories graphically from instances like Egyptian pictograms and Trajan's Column up to the earliest "comics" (like The Yellow Kid) provided a sound basis for my understanding to grow. I am too young to have lived through the horrors of the "McCarthy Era" in which anyone could be accused of being a communist and be blacklisted or even called before a committee with the sole purpose of ferreting out communists. Anyone could be accused, and once accused, even if innocent, you could not live down the accusation. Many people lost their jobs and could no longer work in their chosen profession I, of course, had heard about the terrors of "McCarthyism," and the many awful repercussions. What I didn't know was that something very similar happened in the publishing world to comics and graphic novels. Through a complex series of events including an attempt to blame comics for a rise in juvenile crime and "low living," the "Blame Campaign," and the rise of the "Comics Code" brought the demise of publishers and changed the way the comics industry would be from then on. [9] While looking for this graphic to place here, in this post, I found David Hajdu's book is still for sale. See the link, below. Garcia proposed a number of reasons for the dramatic change in the industry. The first, already mentioned above, was the comic industry's attempt to force "self-censorship" on publishers of comics. Another reason seemed to be that with the market saturated, and the rise of television as a competitor, the market was sorely injured. Perhaps the killing blow came when comics primary national distributor, American News Company, had to face an anti-monopoly suit by the Department of Justice. Garcia tells us that in David Hajdu's book, The Ten-Cent Plague: The Great Comic-Book Scare and How It Changed America, Hajdu lists fifteen pages of writers and artists (over 450 names) who were never able to work in the industry again. Another huge effect of the "purge" was comics would not be able to "toy with themes" for adult readers any more. Very few comics survived, for example Mad comics reorganized and became a magazine, Mad Magazine. Illustrated Classics survived because of their continuing insistence that their adaptations of classics were not comic books. This "Graphic Novel" collects under one cover the following: X-Men: Messiah Com- plex One-Shot; Uncanny X-Men (1963) #492-494; New X-Men (2004) #44-46; X- Men (2004) #205-207; and X-Factor (2005) #25-27. One point Garcia makes in his book is this: Does gathering comics from different years, different comic series, and story lines under one cover really make this a graphic novel? [10] Another repercussion was not only the loss of adult themes (eg. crime or detective stories, horror comics and murder mysteries), but also the resurgence of the old "superheroes" making a comeback--this time with humans as superheroes (Fantastic Four, Spider-Man, etc.). D.C and Marvel flourished; and many old comic books were packaged together under one cover and called a "graphic novel," just to grab the coat tails of true graphic novels to both improve their status and to make more money. It was also during this time that the comix underground began growing. What I have described, here, is nothing more than a very abbreviated, nutshell version of a very small section of Garcia's work. He demonstrates how the evolution of comics shaped and perhaps even readied the way for graphic novels. Just reading Garcia's book helped me to appreciate how the history of drawing stories has influenced the modern comic and graphic novel and to keep an eye open as to where influences may take the graphic novel in the future. I not only loved reading this book in which I was able to explore more about topics like "underground comix", a subject of which I knew very little. Also, reading this book has made a great change in the way I think about not only comics, and graphic novels, it has changed the way I see influences in society--everywhere. Repercussions. Impacts. Stimuli. I no longer think, for example, that businesses fail just because of their poor fiscal management, alone. [11] Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, is one of my graphic novels that I keep at arms reach right by my desk. This book is a wonderful ex- ample of an adult graphic novel. In spite of the seeming negativity, above, of which I have written, actually Santiago Garcia's book, On the Graphic Novel, is hopeful and uplifting. I look at this book as something like a person working to improve their physical condition through training, struggling everyday, wanting to give up, but nonetheless, continuing to push forward through the pain and doubt. And in the end, he or she finds success and a healthier life. So, yes, Garcia honestly and realistically portrays the struggles and triumphs of graphic art communication. It is just so, the graphic novel, growing in "strength," and developing an adult audience looking for mature material, with adult themes. As Garcia pronounces, this growing community of adult graphic art readers will not be satisfied with antiquated themes and stereotypes from their childhood, or those perhaps which have been relegated to "low culture," and will search out more creative topics and sophisticated adult themes. Garcia believes that because of all that has come before and shaped and formed the current aesthetic in graphic communications, on a global level, that we should "behold" that something very "good" has happened in serious comics studies. The Color of Earth by Kim Dong Hwa is a wonderful example of a book banned for a sexual theme. The book is about a "truly intimate but respectful journey...of a young girl and her widowed mother." The focus of the story is on the young girl's sexual awakening. [12] Since I read and review graphic novels from time to time, I found my knowledge vastly improved by reading Santiago Garcia's book. I am more interested than ever in reviewing some of the really good titles, perhaps like, Maus by the wonderful Art Spiegelman, Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, or one of the other books listed in the banned book section, above. Topics about genocide, war, sexual abuse, and repression are just a few topics adults might be looking forward to reading. So, it is important that we sound out on the issue of banning books (in all forms), and make our voices heard that we do not accept the banning of books. One thing you can do is to choose a banned book and read it--and then pass it on to a friend. This year the focus is on young adult literature, so choose a good title from the banned books list and expand your knowledge of our young adults. FINAL WORDS AND RATING: I found the incredible knowledge and background material given to the reader absolutely dumbfounding. Garcia presents his concepts in a clear and very understanding manner, and yet is able to steer through a mountain of information to get the reader to the destination. I am very impressed with Santiago Garcia's articulate presentation of material. And, as I mentioned, above, the information that I take away from this book will, undoubtedly, aid me in my analysis and review of future graphic novels (and those that say they are graphic novels, but are not). I am genuinely excited to dive into a graphic novel and start writing. [13] Given all the information I have given, above, I am very pleased to award On the Graphic Novel by Santiago Garcia a rating of 4.0 stars out of 5. This book deservedly has achieved this very good rating. Thank you for joining me today as we got to look at this exciting and wonderful book covering the world of comics, graphic novels, the history of these art/literature forms, and the influences that happened to form the current events in these industries. Please join me next time as we take up a new book and learn more from the world of reading. Also, Thank you for taking your time to read and consider my viewpoints in this blog post. I have truly enjoyed being with you, here, today. I look forward to the next time we meet. Until next time . . . . . . many happy pages of reading. This flower is a white Rose of Sharon with a red center. [**] Best wishes, Sharon. _________________________________________________________ REFERENCES/SOURCES [1] "On the Graphic Novel." [Santiago Garcia] smile.amazon.com. Retrieved 06-09-15. [2] "Ivanhoe." [Sir Walter Scott] amazon.com. Retrieved 07-07-15. [3] "Fahrenheit 451 Book Covers." [Sarah Surachi] behance.net. Retrieved 09-22-15. [4] "Celebrate The Freedom To Read." Simon and Schuster Books. youtube.com. Retrieved 09-22-15. [5] "Cover Up: 10 Essential Banned and Challenged Graphic Novels." ew.com. Retrieved 09-25-15. [6] "Jeff Smith's 'Bone," 10 Years On: 'Out From Boneville' Tribute Edition." geekdad.com. Retrieved 09-25-15. [7] "The Complete Maus, The Twenty Fifth Anniversary Edition." [art spiegelman] tower.com. Retrieved 09-25-15. [8] "Know Thy History: The Yellow Kid." [el santo] webcomicoverlook.com. Retrieved 09-27-15. [9] "The Ten-Cent Plague: The Great Comic Book Scare and How it Changed America." [david hadju] amazon.com. Retrieved 09-97-15. [10] "X-Men: Messiah Complex Kindle Edition." amazon.com. Retrieved 09-28-15. [11] While this photograph is my own, I want to provide you with the link for this book: "The Complete Persepolis." [paperback/black and white] amazon.com. Retrieved 09-28-15. [12] "The Color of Earth (Volume 1)." [kim dong hwa] [mcmillan publishers] us.macmillan.com. Retrieved 09-28-15. [13] "Four out of Five Stars!" purpleinkwriters.wordpress.com. Retrieved 09-28-15. [*] "Netgalley." netgalley.com. Retrieved 06-08-15. [**] "White Rose of Sharon Gifts." zazzle.com. Retrieved 06-08-15.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Powers

    Book Review by:Sharon Powers. To see the book review with all the graphics go to at: http://sharonsloveofbooks.blogspot.com/ _______________________________________ In middle school, I loved reading Classics Illustrated. Seeing the pictures along with the words helped me to visualize the story, making it come alive for me. But what does reading Classics Illustrated as a child have to do with Santiago Garcia's beautiful book, "On the Graphic Novel"? The connection is one most children have: the re Book Review by:Sharon Powers. To see the book review with all the graphics go to at: http://sharonsloveofbooks.blogspot.com/ _______________________________________ In middle school, I loved reading Classics Illustrated. Seeing the pictures along with the words helped me to visualize the story, making it come alive for me. But what does reading Classics Illustrated as a child have to do with Santiago Garcia's beautiful book, "On the Graphic Novel"? The connection is one most children have: the reading of comics. And, though I read Classics Illustrated, I never had the same life-like experiences that daydreamer Walter Mitty had. Nonetheless, the Classics Illustrated stories did help me to create a kind of "reality" where the stories could live. When I was ten, my parents sent me to Children's Hospital in San Francisco while the rest of my family stayed home, some three and one-half hours away--too far to drive every day to see me. I had my operation and skin graft (to my foot), and began a slow recovery--the one day visits on the weekend stretched out to one day every two weeks. Aching with loneliness day after day for many weeks, I turned to my Classics Illustrated, to occupy my mind and to keep my spirits up. I gratefully accepted the titles my folks would bring when they visited me. This particular edition is a hardcover version of the classic novel, Ivanhoe, by Sir Walter Scott, adapted to Classics Illustrated. Comics and graphic novels can be the inspiration to read--reading this Classics Illustrated title inspired me to read the full novel, hardcover edition of Sir Walter Scott's Ivanhoe. [2] I loved many of those Classics Illustrated titles. Some of my favorites: The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas; The Last Days of Pompeii by Edward Bulwer-Lyton; The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells; Swiss Family Robinson by Jonathan Wyss; and The Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain. My absolute favorite of them all, though, was Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott. Looking at the book cover, on the right, here, note that the cover indicates the title as being a "Full-Color Graphic Novel Adaptation." Of course, back then, as a kid, I did not know what a "graphic novel" was. As an adult, I learned that my assumptions about what a graphic novel was were patently wrong. I sought a clear definition on-line for "graphic novel." I found that I had to glean bits and pieces of the definition from many sources to finally put together (what I thought was) a great definition. If you look back on some of my other posts, you can find that definition (of multiple parts), there. I really liked the book and all the information provided. I liked it so much that I purchased the hard- cover edition for myself. [ ] Let's take a look at Santiago Garcia's book, On the Graphic Novel, translated by Bruce Campbell, to see if we can resolve the question about the definition of graphic novel. To begin, let's examine a short synopsis of the book. SHORT SYNOPSIS: Santiago Garcia is a renowned comics artist. In this publication, Garcia traces the history of comics and the graphic novel back from its infancy and development in nineteenth-century European "sequential art." He takes us through the early beginnings of newspaper strips (in the US) all the way through the early twentieth-century evolution of the "comic book" and to its inevitable upheaval. Garcia examines both the "aesthetic" as well as the "metamorphosis" aspects that made for "the rise of the graphic novel." He lays out the "formal" elements and then takes us through the influences of the "cultural" aspects of comics and the graphic novel. He continues his exploration of this subject and shows the reader the many "formats" of the comic as a "popular medium." Two pages of the opened-up book; the pages illustrate a few of the "comics" that have been published in the past, as well as provide a text with information on the history of the comic industry as well as that of the graphic novel. Garcia states that comics are most often associated with children; even so, comics were condemned as a bad moral influence to children. Comics, at best, were seen as "unedifying" to the reading public. The material found in comics was such that no intelligent, educated, or public personage would want to pick them up to read. To show just how far the world of comics has come, Garcia provides illustrations from all over the world: Spain, France, Germany, and even Japan. Garcia uses these examples to clarify how the graphic novel has developed into its increased international profile. He also points to the graphic novel's increasingly sophisticated silhouette and how it evolved into a new type of "graphic narrative production." Moreover, the "graphic novel," is a new way of "empowering" authors. One of the very big things Garcia points out is that this new model challenges the prejudices that attached to "comics," and shows what they have yet to achieve. CELEBRATE THE FREEDOM TO READ! [3] With all that has come before in the evolution of comics and graphic novels, the comic has been condemned as unfit for children to read because it contains nothing of worth. Indeed, it has been decried as encouraging low life and moral values. Since Santiago Garcia speaks extensively throughout his book about the perception of comics and graphic novels, his book ties in perfectly with this week as BANNED BOOKS WEEK, 09-27-15 THROUGH 10-03-15. I want to take part in a great opportunity to help make the point that books in all genres, formats, philosophies, ideologies, etc. should not be banned. In one sense it is quite simple because "no one," as Lisa McMann, author of the Wake Trilogy, has said, "should have the power to decide what other people's kids may or may not read." [4] In one form or another all of us have felt the impact of books that have been the target for removal from libraries and school bookshelves across this vast nation. Take part this week and join in spreading the word about Banned Books Week (09/27-10/03/15). Please start by simply taking a moment to enjoy and share this enlightening promo from YouTube about the week ahead.[4] [6] I bring up the issue of banned books because, as author Santiago Garcia points out in his book, On the Graphic Novel, modernly graphic novels have received recognition and are viewed by some as legitimate books, containing legitimate topics and stories. Jason Heller of Entertainment Weekly, tells us that that "attention cuts both ways." He continues to explain that "[w]hile comics are now being taken seriously as literature, they're also being challenged and banned along with literature" by both private and public organizations, citizen groups, and religious communities. [5] [7] In Heller's article of 09-21-14, Heller listed a top group of important graphic novels and comics that have taken hits and have been banned by various organizations. Those top ten are as follows: (1) The Color of Earth by Dong Hwa Kim; (2) Fun Home by Alison Bechdel; (3) Bone by Jeff Smith; (4) Batman: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore and Brian Bolland; (5) Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi; (6) SideScrollers by Matthew Loux; (7) Ice Haven by Daniel Clowes; (8) Stuck Rubber Baby by Howard Cruse; (9) Maus by Art Spiegelman; and (10) Blankets by Craig Thompson. [5] The importance of how books, comics, and graphic novels are received by the public speaks to our very right to be able to choose to read whatever we wish to read. It is all about maintaining an essential freedom. Now, to continue on with that in mind, let's get on to what I think about Santiago Garcia's book, On the Graphic Novel. WHAT I THINK ABOUT SANTIAGO GARCIA'S BOOK, ON THE GRAPHIC NOVEL: At first I had assumed that Mr. Garcia would be providing a definitive defini- tion of a "graphic novel." It wasn't long until I was disabused of that notion. In the very first pages of the Preface to the American Edition, Garcia tells the reader that he is "not interested in a regular 'definition' of comics...or...the graphic novel." Wondering what the book was all about confused me; after all, the title of Garcia's work is, "On the Graphic Novel." Just a little later I read what Garcia had in- tended for us. Garcia ex- plained that he intended to show us all what the "mean- ing" of comics was to us in the past, what it means to us in the present and what it will mean to us in the future. The second part of all this is that Garcia also intended to show us how the graphic novel is connected to it all. "The Yellow Kid" (because he wore yellow gar- ments) at first, had dialogue written on his clothing--before the thought bubbles became prominent. [8] Delving into the pages of the e-book (an advance reading copy from NetGalley) I began to look at comics and graphic novels in a different light. Bringing the history of the telling of stories graphically from instances like Egyptian pictograms and Trajan's Column up to the earliest "comics" (like The Yellow Kid) provided a sound basis for my understanding to grow. I am too young to have lived through the horrors of the "McCarthy Era" in which anyone could be accused of being a communist and be blacklisted or even called before a committee with the sole purpose of ferreting out communists. Anyone could be accused, and once accused, even if innocent, you could not live down the accusation. Many people lost their jobs and could no longer work in their chosen profession I, of course, had heard about the terrors of "McCarthyism," and the many awful repercussions. What I didn't know was that something very similar happened in the publishing world to comics and graphic novels. Through a complex series of events including an attempt to blame comics for a rise in juvenile crime and "low living," the "Blame Campaign," and the rise of the "Comics Code" brought the demise of publishers and changed the way the comics industry would be from then on. [9] While looking for this graphic to place here, in this post, I found David Hajdu's book is still for sale. See the link, below. Garcia proposed a number of reasons for the dramatic change in the industry. The first, already mentioned above, was the comic industry's attempt to force "self-censorship" on publishers of comics. Another reason seemed to be that with the market saturated, and the rise of television as a competitor, the market was sorely injured. Perhaps the killing blow came when comics primary national distributor, American News Company, had to face an anti-monopoly suit by the Department of Justice. Garcia tells us that in David Hajdu's book, The Ten-Cent Plague: The Great Comic-Book Scare and How It Changed America, Hajdu lists fifteen pages of writers and artists (over 450 names) who were never able to work in the industry again. Another huge effect of the "purge" was comics would not be able to "toy with themes" for adult readers any more. Very few comics survived, for example Mad comics reorganized and became a magazine, Mad Magazine. Illustrated Classics survived because of their continuing insistence that their adaptations of classics were not comic books. This "Graphic Novel" collects under one cover the following: X-Men: Messiah Com- plex One-Shot; Uncanny X-Men (1963) #492-494; New X-Men (2004) #44-46; X- Men (2004) #205-207; and X-Factor (2005) #25-27. One point Garcia makes in his book is this: Does gathering comics from different years, different comic series, and story lines under one cover really make this a graphic novel? [10] Another repercussion was not only the loss of adult themes (eg. crime or detective stories, horror comics and murder mysteries), but also the resurgence of the old "superheroes" making a comeback--this time with humans as superheroes (Fantastic Four, Spider-Man, etc.). D.C and Marvel flourished; and many old comic books were packaged together under one cover and called a "graphic novel," just to grab the coat tails of true graphic novels to both improve their status and to make more money. It was also during this time that the comix underground began growing. What I have described, here, is nothing more than a very abbreviated, nutshell version of a very small section of Garcia's work. He demonstrates how the evolution of comics shaped and perhaps even readied the way for graphic novels. Just reading Garcia's book helped me to appreciate how the history of drawing stories has influenced the modern comic and graphic novel and to keep an eye open as to where influences may take the graphic novel in the future. I not only loved reading this book in which I was able to explore more about topics like "underground comix", a subject of which I knew very little. Also, reading this book has made a great change in the way I think about not only comics, and graphic novels, it has changed the way I see influences in society--everywhere. Repercussions. Impacts. Stimuli. I no longer think, for example, that businesses fail just because of their poor fiscal management, alone. [11] Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, is one of my graphic novels that I keep at arms reach right by my desk. This book is a wonderful ex- ample of an adult graphic novel. In spite of the seeming negativity, above, of which I have written, actually Santiago Garcia's book, On the Graphic Novel, is hopeful and uplifting. I look at this book as something like a person working to improve their physical condition through training, struggling everyday, wanting to give up, but nonetheless, continuing to push forward through the pain and doubt. And in the end, he or she finds success and a healthier life. So, yes, Garcia honestly and realistically portrays the struggles and triumphs of graphic art communication. It is just so, the graphic novel, growing in "strength," and developing an adult audience looking for mature material, with adult themes. As Garcia pronounces, this growing community of adult graphic art readers will not be satisfied with antiquated themes and stereotypes from their childhood, or those perhaps which have been relegated to "low culture," and will search out more creative topics and sophisticated adult themes. Garcia believes that because of all that has come before and shaped and formed the current aesthetic in graphic communications, on a global level, that we should "behold" that something very "good" has happened in serious comics studies. The Color of Earth by Kim Dong Hwa is a wonderful example of a book banned for a sexual theme. The book is about a "truly intimate but respectful journey...of a young girl and her widowed mother." The focus of the story is on the young girl's sexual awakening. [12] Since I read and review graphic novels from time to time, I found my knowledge vastly improved by reading Santiago Garcia's book. I am more interested than ever in reviewing some of the really good titles, perhaps like, Maus by the wonderful Art Spiegelman, Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, or one of the other books listed in the banned book section, above. Topics about genocide, war, sexual abuse, and repression are just a few topics adults might be looking forward to reading. So, it is important that we sound out on the issue of banning books (in all forms), and make our voices heard that we do not accept the banning of books. One thing you can do is to choose a banned book and read it--and then pass it on to a friend. This year the focus is on young adult literature, so choose a good title from the banned books list and expand your knowledge of our young adults. FINAL WORDS AND RATING: I found the incredible knowledge and background material given to the reader absolutely dumbfounding. Garcia presents his concepts in a clear and very understanding manner, and yet is able to steer through a mountain of information to get the reader to the destination. I am very impressed with Santiago Garcia's articulate presentation of material. And, as I mentioned, above, the information that I take away from this book will, undoubtedly, aid me in my analysis and review of future graphic novels (and those that say they are graphic novels, but are not). I am genuinely excited to dive into a graphic novel and start writing. [13] Given all the information I have given, above, I am very pleased to award On the Graphic Novel by Santiago Garcia a rating of 4.0 stars out of 5. This book deservedly has achieved this very good rating. Thank you for joining me today as we got to look at this exciting and wonderful book covering the world of comics, graphic novels, the history of these art/literature forms, and the influences that happened to form the current events in these industries. Please join me next time as we take up a new book and learn more from the world of reading. Also, Thank you for taking your time to read and consider my viewpoints in this blog post. I have truly enjoyed being with you, here, today. I look forward to the next time we meet. Until next time . . . . . . many happy pages of reading. This flower is a white Rose of Sharon with a red center. [**] Best wishes, Sharon _________________________________________________________ REFERENCES/SOURCES [1] "On the Graphic Novel." [Santiago Garcia] smile.amazon.com. Retrieved 06-09-15. [2] "Ivanhoe." [Sir Walter Scott] amazon.com. Retrieved 07-07-15. [3] "Fahrenheit 451 Book Covers." [Sarah Surachi] behance.net. Retrieved 09-22-15. [4] "Celebrate The Freedom To Read." Simon and Schuster Books. youtube.com. Retrieved 09-22-15. [5] "Cover Up: 10 Essential Banned and Challenged Graphic Novels." ew.com. Retrieved 09-25-15. [6] "Jeff Smith's 'Bone," 10 Years On: 'Out From Boneville' Tribute Edition." geekdad.com. Retrieved 09-25-15. [7] "The Complete Maus, The Twenty Fifth Anniversary Edition." [art spiegelman] tower.com. Retrieved 09-25-15. [8] "Know Thy History: The Yellow Kid." [el santo] webcomicoverlook.com. Retrieved 09-27-15. [9] "The Ten-Cent Plague: The Great Comic Book Scare and How it Changed America." [david hadju] amazon.com. Retrieved 09-97-15. [10] "X-Men: Messiah Complex Kindle Edition." amazon.com. Retrieved 09-28-15. [11] While this photograph is my own, I want to provide you with the link for this book: "The Complete Persepolis." [paperback/black and white] amazon.com. Retrieved 09-28-15. [12] "The Color of Earth (Volume 1)." [kim dong hwa] [mcmillan publishers] us.macmillan.com. Retrieved 09-28-15. [13] "Four out of Five Stars!" purpleinkwriters.wordpress.com. Retrieved 09-28-15. [*] "Netgalley." netgalley.com. Retrieved 06-08-15. [**] "White Rose of Sharon Gifts." zazzle.com. Retrieved 06-08-15.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Montse

    Creo que es un libro súper útil para hacer como una especie de arqueología del término 'novela gráfica'. El autor intenta tener una mirada panorámica de este fenómeno; entonces, tanto está la tradición anglosajona como nombres de la fracobelga, la japonesa, algunas mujeres africanas, y claro, la española. Al final, me parece que, aunque hay muy buenas citas, no termina de dar una definición. Claro, es un libro de hace diez años y tal vez en ese momento sí era algo nuevo la novela gráfica. No sé, Creo que es un libro súper útil para hacer como una especie de arqueología del término 'novela gráfica'. El autor intenta tener una mirada panorámica de este fenómeno; entonces, tanto está la tradición anglosajona como nombres de la fracobelga, la japonesa, algunas mujeres africanas, y claro, la española. Al final, me parece que, aunque hay muy buenas citas, no termina de dar una definición. Claro, es un libro de hace diez años y tal vez en ese momento sí era algo nuevo la novela gráfica. No sé, tal vez una reedición con un epílogo no vendría mal. En fin, una lectura exhaustiva e interesante de la historia del cómic.

  7. 4 out of 5

    David Sanz

    Un ensayo excelente, sobre todo la parte histórica hasta los años 70 del siglo XX. Me llama la atención que con todos los antecedentes que se nombran, no se haga ninguna referencia a las aucas.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I received a digital review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Monita Mohan

    Picked this one out from Netgalley and I have to say it is extremely educational. I'm not a history buff and don't read a lot of non-fiction, so at the start this was hard to get into. It didn't help that the intros seemed to be written through a haze of tedium. This one book charts the entire history of graphic novels and its many iterations. What starts off as an argument about the semantics, definition and meaning of the very phrase 'graphic novel' (a conclusion we never come to) soon turns in Picked this one out from Netgalley and I have to say it is extremely educational. I'm not a history buff and don't read a lot of non-fiction, so at the start this was hard to get into. It didn't help that the intros seemed to be written through a haze of tedium. This one book charts the entire history of graphic novels and its many iterations. What starts off as an argument about the semantics, definition and meaning of the very phrase 'graphic novel' (a conclusion we never come to) soon turns into a proto-chronological history lesson on who wrote what, when, where and sometimes why. We are provided mini biographies of some of the game-changers in the comic book industry and the repercussions of each movement. The author delves into the comic book histories of several countries which gives this book a rounded international, if not global, feel. The entire book feels like it could have been written in the early 1900s; the language is languorous and dense. The denseness is often hard to trudge through - this is about graphic novels, by definition a visually expressive medium, but this book does not evoke the same sensibility. The version of the book that I downloaded kept the pages of iconic comic books, or graphic novels as it were, at the end of each quarter. While this made it easier to read (Netgalley's illustrated books hate every reading software in town), it dissociated itself from the context of the story behind the comic. One just ended up scrolling quickly through the pages instead of comparing and contrasting the styles and understanding the possible repercussions of the same. My greatest criticisms about this book are two-fold. The book minimises the impact and significance of Manga in the world of comics. They may not have contributed to the realisation of the graphic novel, but Manga's influence cannot be denied (this from someone who actively doesn't read Manga). It's problematic that the author only touches on the subject in the third quarter - Manga should have had an entire chapter dedicated to its inception and influence. It's far too important (admittedly, often in the wrong way). It is worrying that the author selectively chose only Western comics as the basis for his history. That's not where it was at, mate. The other great grouse is that the author appears to begrudgingly include women creators in his book. It is evident to everyone that all popular media actively dissuade or prevent women from entering, either as creators or consumers. The comic book industry is no different and in fact has a particularly poor reputation when it comes to gender-inclusiveness (at least in the US, don't know about the rest of the world). The author does not shine a light on this; without a commentary on women in the comic book industry (as well as the lack thereof) the book appears incomplete. When the author does mention women writers, he clumps them together as writers of autobiographical graphic novels only - and does so with more than a hint of condescension. Granted this book was not meant to be a history of the comic book industry, but it is practically written as such and hence it was of great importance for the author to acknowledge the role women played in diversifying the language and subject-matter of comic books. They may not have been the pioneers of these diverse new topics, but their entry into this world have definitely changed the landscape of how and what we view as graphic novels. The book is indeed an impressive feat and an important resource for anyone who loves comics. Had it been even more detailed when it came to the global and gender landscapes of the industry I would have given it a much higher rating. A must-read for comic book enthusiasts.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan Hawthorne

    Merci à NetGalley et à la University Press of Mississippi pour ce service presse numérique. Pour quelqu’un qui aime les comics et essai d’en apprendre plus afin de mieux comprendre le medium, cette lecture est merveilleuse. Santiago García débute son analyse de façon chronologique, avec notamment les ancêtres du comics comme les tableaux séquentiels de William Hogarth, puis les éditions illustrées de romans – classiques ou destinés à la jeunesse. Petit à petit, l’auteur avance dans le temps pour Merci à NetGalley et à la University Press of Mississippi pour ce service presse numérique. Pour quelqu’un qui aime les comics et essai d’en apprendre plus afin de mieux comprendre le medium, cette lecture est merveilleuse. Santiago García débute son analyse de façon chronologique, avec notamment les ancêtres du comics comme les tableaux séquentiels de William Hogarth, puis les éditions illustrées de romans – classiques ou destinés à la jeunesse. Petit à petit, l’auteur avance dans le temps pour nous rappeler l’influence qu’ont pu avoir les pulps sur la création du comics, puis l’apparition de comic strips et enfin, la production des premiers comics et leur réception. L’auteur nous offre également une analyse sur ce que représente le comics de nos jours en tant que médium, et ses évolutions possibles. J’ai beaucoup apprécié que l’auteur ne se contente pas de parler des États-Unis : il explore également la bande dessinée franco-belge, les mangas du Japon, les historietas d’Espagne et bien d’autres encore. Le fait que Santiago García ne soit pas originaire des États-Unis a probablement aidé dans la construction de cette analyse étendue et j’adore le fait qu’il s’attarde également sur la réception des comics américains en Europe, en ponctuant tout cela par des anecdotes personnelles sur sa découverte du médium dans sa jeunesse. Bien sûr, puisque « comics » est un terme bien vaste, et puisque d’autres mots semblent désigner quelque chose qui s’en approche beaucoup, Santiago García revient sur la définition de chacun de ces mots, leurs origines et ce qu’ils sont devenus. Par exemple, il nous rappelle que le « roman graphique » était simplement un moyen pour les auteurs et éditeurs de présenter leurs comics (puisque c’est de ça dont il s’agit) comme plus érudits que ceux de leurs prédécesseurs, notamment avec les genres de super-héros, les romances et les histoires de monstres. Puisqu’il s’agissait également d’un moyen de faire accepter le médium à une audience plus large, c’est fantastique qu’on ait parlé de romans graphiques, mais finalement cela semble obsolète de continuer à utiliser le terme. Enfin, l’auteur ne s’arrête pas à l’histoire des éditeurs de comics les plus importants et les plus connus tels que DC Comics, Marvel ou Image Comics. Deux chapitres sont dédiés aux « comix » underground et aux comics alternatifs, ce qui montre encore une fois à quel point le médium a évolué et toutes les histoires différentes qui peuvent être racontées, et de manières diverses, derrière le mot « comics ». Je pense qu’une personne ayant lu un grand nombre de comics, de tous genres et de toutes périodes, appréciera cette lecture encore plus que moi, puisque le livre présente des analyses pertinentes sur des comics bien précis. C’était fantastique de pouvoir lire en quoi un titre précis correspondait aux comics de l’époque ou au contraire, en quoi il s’en éloignait et ce que l’auteur avait bien pu initier comme genre, surtout quand je connaissais le comics dont Santiago García parlait ! J’ai encore pleins de lectures à faire et j’adorerais retrouver ce livre plus tard, quand je pourrais mieux comprendre toutes les analyses. Pas d’inquiétudes si vous n’avez lu aucun des « classiques » du médium, les illustrations et extraits vous donnerons une idée de la chose !

  11. 5 out of 5

    La Revistería Comics

    Finalmente tenemos en nuestro local la magnífica obra "La Novela gráfica", de Santiago García. Este libro de colección realiza un detallado, inteligente, entretenido y profundo repaso por la hisotria del cómic, y cómo éste género fue mutando e incorporando estilos, destinatarios y formas. Es un verdadero ensayo, ya que para su creación, Santiago usó de base su tesis doctoral en Historia del Arte, de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. La Novela Grafica explica cómo es que el comic llegó al estado Finalmente tenemos en nuestro local la magnífica obra "La Novela gráfica", de Santiago García. Este libro de colección realiza un detallado, inteligente, entretenido y profundo repaso por la hisotria del cómic, y cómo éste género fue mutando e incorporando estilos, destinatarios y formas. Es un verdadero ensayo, ya que para su creación, Santiago usó de base su tesis doctoral en Historia del Arte, de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. La Novela Grafica explica cómo es que el comic llegó al estado de madurez y prestigio del que goza actualmente. Valiéndose de determinados estudios fundamentales, como los de Scott McCloud, Kuntzle, Groensteen y Will Eisner, García describe el término "Novela Gráfica", que se utilzia actualmente para definir a las obras "maduras" del comic y que parece estar excento de la carga negativa que tienen otros términos más conocidos, asociados quizás a la historieta como entretenimiento infantil. [...] Esta es una obra que lleva a la reflexión. Que, compartiendo herramientas, datos, fechas y fenómenos, nos dota de disparadores que generan debate, ideas, y análisis sobre el hermoso fenómeno de los comics. Santiago García tiene su teoría, su mirada, pero no la impone, sólo la comparte. ¿Cuál es la tuya? Animate a leerlo y a pensar sobre este género que todos amamos. Reseña completa en: http://larevisteriacomics.blogspot.co...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    This is a translation and I am grateful for the English version. It is a fairly heavy read and covers a large part of the history of comics and into graphic novels and up to the present day. Garcia does not provide a single clear definition of "graphic novel" preferring to let the reader decide from several different views. He talks about the popular view of graphic novels and of the people who read them. Having worked briefly in a library I was surprised at the often expressed disdain for reade This is a translation and I am grateful for the English version. It is a fairly heavy read and covers a large part of the history of comics and into graphic novels and up to the present day. Garcia does not provide a single clear definition of "graphic novel" preferring to let the reader decide from several different views. He talks about the popular view of graphic novels and of the people who read them. Having worked briefly in a library I was surprised at the often expressed disdain for readers of graphic novels but usually these people hadn't seen one recently. The content and quality of modern graphic novels is amazing - from Dickens and Agatha Christie to X-Men and Spiderman and through the Japanese Manga there is something for everyone in pictorial form. I enjoyed reading the book and learned a lot about the genesis of comics and the growth in writers and concepts. Recommended if you know a die hard "comic" fan or if you're looking to understand what your teenager sees in books with pictures. I was given copy of this book by Netgalley in return for an honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Trever

    *Received this from Netgalley for an honest review* I thought the book was a graphic novel about graphic novels. I thought to myself... hmmm... that sounds interesting. But it is just a regular book with a graphic novel front about graphic novels. The book did go through the history of just graphic novels and didn't really delve to deep in comics and how graphic novels grew out of that, but since I sat in on a art/history lesson about graphic novels I can say it does an excellent job. I was more e *Received this from Netgalley for an honest review* I thought the book was a graphic novel about graphic novels. I thought to myself... hmmm... that sounds interesting. But it is just a regular book with a graphic novel front about graphic novels. The book did go through the history of just graphic novels and didn't really delve to deep in comics and how graphic novels grew out of that, but since I sat in on a art/history lesson about graphic novels I can say it does an excellent job. I was more excited for the pictures, but it was kind of a let down.

  14. 4 out of 5

    aLejandRø

    En la búsqueda del origen de la “novela grafica” García nos pasea por la historia del comic desde sus orígenes hasta nuestros días, planteando interesantes conceptos y destacando y recomendando obras en los diferentes periodos que propone. Son incluidas un gran número de reproducciones, complemento muy necesario para este tipo de trabajo.

  15. 4 out of 5

    álvaro

    El principio es increíble, con mucha documentación, bibliografía y ejemplos de los orígenes de la historieta moderna. Conforme se acerva al presente, se emociona y el rigor se va deshinchando. Con todo, imprescindible.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Xavier Àgueda

    El título despista, es un buen libro de divulgación que repasa toda la historia del cómic. Desde las primeras tiras de prensa a las novelas gráficas, pasando por los comic-books de superhéroes, el comic code, los comix underground… sólo se olvida, por supuesto, de los webcómics.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Palimp

    Todavía no se sabe muy bien cual es la definición de 'Novela gráfica' pero Santiago García -uno de los mejores guionistas del cómic actual- realiza un estudio que rastrea las fuentes y la evolución del formato. Todavía no se sabe muy bien cual es la definición de 'Novela gráfica' pero Santiago García -uno de los mejores guionistas del cómic actual- realiza un estudio que rastrea las fuentes y la evolución del formato.

  18. 5 out of 5

    GONZA

    A great essay in the form of a love story for comics and graphic novels. Un grande saggio che prende la forma di una grande storia d'amore nei cronfronti dei fumetti e delle graphic novel. THANKS TO NETGALLEY AND UNIVERSITY PRESS OF MISSISIPI FOR THE PREVIEW! A great essay in the form of a love story for comics and graphic novels. Un grande saggio che prende la forma di una grande storia d'amore nei cronfronti dei fumetti e delle graphic novel. THANKS TO NETGALLEY AND UNIVERSITY PRESS OF MISSISIPI FOR THE PREVIEW!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Variaciones Enrojo

    Libro teórico que analiza el mundo de la historieta en general y del término Novela gráfica en particular, en un recorrido que abarca prácticamente todo el siglo XX y lo que va del XXI.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dony Grayman

    Libro teórico que trata de explicar el tramposo término Novela gráfica.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Raffaele

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carol Tilley

  23. 5 out of 5

    Santiago Sánchez

  24. 5 out of 5

    May

  25. 4 out of 5

    Noomi Books

  26. 5 out of 5

    Germán

  27. 4 out of 5

    GastOn DIaz

  28. 4 out of 5

    fonz

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tropo Alegro

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wendelin Gray

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