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Human Behavior in Extreme Situations: Implications for K-12 Education in the Twenty-First Century

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Columbine. Virginia Tech. Sandy Hook. For most Americans, these names conjure images of violence and feelings of terror or deep sadness. While news reports of rising crime rates build up each day and all-too-frequent occurrences of school-based violence cause panic and fear, policy-makers and school administrators have scrambled to ensure that students are safe and protected i Columbine. Virginia Tech. Sandy Hook. For most Americans, these names conjure images of violence and feelings of terror or deep sadness. While news reports of rising crime rates build up each day and all-too-frequent occurrences of school-based violence cause panic and fear, policy-makers and school administrators have scrambled to ensure that students are safe and protected in the classroom, in many cases by increasing security, arming school-based police, and putting surveillance systems in place. But looking to the past and examining the ways that humans have responded to novel dangers and extreme situations throughout history may provide us with a better idea of ways that we can adapt ourselves to the threats we now face, particularly in school settings. This book analyzes the response techniques, collaborative models, and personal characteristics that helped individuals from prisoners of concentration camps to kidnapping victims escape their situations and provides modern-day tactics for both responding to and preventing violence in schools.


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Columbine. Virginia Tech. Sandy Hook. For most Americans, these names conjure images of violence and feelings of terror or deep sadness. While news reports of rising crime rates build up each day and all-too-frequent occurrences of school-based violence cause panic and fear, policy-makers and school administrators have scrambled to ensure that students are safe and protected i Columbine. Virginia Tech. Sandy Hook. For most Americans, these names conjure images of violence and feelings of terror or deep sadness. While news reports of rising crime rates build up each day and all-too-frequent occurrences of school-based violence cause panic and fear, policy-makers and school administrators have scrambled to ensure that students are safe and protected in the classroom, in many cases by increasing security, arming school-based police, and putting surveillance systems in place. But looking to the past and examining the ways that humans have responded to novel dangers and extreme situations throughout history may provide us with a better idea of ways that we can adapt ourselves to the threats we now face, particularly in school settings. This book analyzes the response techniques, collaborative models, and personal characteristics that helped individuals from prisoners of concentration camps to kidnapping victims escape their situations and provides modern-day tactics for both responding to and preventing violence in schools.

33 review for Human Behavior in Extreme Situations: Implications for K-12 Education in the Twenty-First Century

  1. 5 out of 5

    Reader Views

    HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN EXTREME SITUATIONS Robert H. Koff PhD and Kathryn Hanna M.S.W. InkwaterPress (2015) ISBN 9781629012766 Reviewed by Christine Watson for Reader Views (11/15) “Human Behavior in Extreme Situations” by Robert H. Koff PhD and Kathryn Hanna M.S.W. is a much-needed book for K-12 schools specifically, and for everyone in general. The advice and suggestions are based on in-depth research of historical events where people were put into tragic situations and forced to survive using these crit HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN EXTREME SITUATIONS Robert H. Koff PhD and Kathryn Hanna M.S.W. InkwaterPress (2015) ISBN 9781629012766 Reviewed by Christine Watson for Reader Views (11/15) “Human Behavior in Extreme Situations” by Robert H. Koff PhD and Kathryn Hanna M.S.W. is a much-needed book for K-12 schools specifically, and for everyone in general. The advice and suggestions are based on in-depth research of historical events where people were put into tragic situations and forced to survive using these critical skills. Koff and Hanna do a great job of summarizing tragic events in history, and breaking down how the victims survived traumatic life events. Leadership is a large component of survival. Shackleton’s Voyage in 1914 was an example of how leadership in action saved the lives of everyone on board the “Endurance” ship in an effort to cross the Antarctic Continent. When things went wrong, guidance, trust, sticking together and having patience proved as the skills needed to save the crew. Another historical event discussed was the concentration camp of Sobibor during World War II. Several prisoners were planning an escape, and they took advantage of the skills, experience, and knowledge of their fellow prisoners to create a plan, make difficult decisions, and then follow through with the plan when it got tough. These are examples of how a little planning and leadership can help to make schools a much safer place for the students and staff. The authors talk about how the effect of different methods of emergency responses can vary, and that balancing higher security with preventative measures is the best way to create a safe environment for all involved. Helping to create leadership skills in the school faculty, staff, and other stakeholders, along with the parents of the students, will go a long way in giving students the safety they need to make it through difficult circumstances that may occur in the future. I highly recommend “Human Behavior in Extreme Situations” by Robert H. Koff PhD and Kathryn Hanna M.S.W. to school leaders and parents because they are responsible for the safety and care of children on a regular, often daily basis. I also recommend this book for anyone interested in learning how to develop some skills needed to survive a tragic event. As no one knows when something like this could happen, these skills could be invaluable in saving lives.

  2. 5 out of 5

    San Diego Book Review

    Reviewed by Kim Heimbuch You’re in the midst of your English class of twenty-five high school students debating the symbolism of George Orwell’s //Animal Farm//. Mid-sentence, a chill runs up your spine and all at once, twenty-six heads turn towards the door attempting to assess why fireworks are going off in the hallway. Screams shattering the silence just feet away beyond the classroom door. Panic filling your students as one girl lets out her own panicked filled scream. What do you do?You can Reviewed by Kim Heimbuch You’re in the midst of your English class of twenty-five high school students debating the symbolism of George Orwell’s //Animal Farm//. Mid-sentence, a chill runs up your spine and all at once, twenty-six heads turn towards the door attempting to assess why fireworks are going off in the hallway. Screams shattering the silence just feet away beyond the classroom door. Panic filling your students as one girl lets out her own panicked filled scream. What do you do?You can read this entire review at San Diego Book Review

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ariana

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    Frederick Rotzien

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    Sangeeta

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    Glenn

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    Ann Ellis

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    Todd Rumsey

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    Heather

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    Pamela Miller

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    Cynthia Schwarzer

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    Dr. Cole Marie Mckinnon

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    Amber Griffith

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    Cheryl Bradley

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    Tammy Hornbeck

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    Tempest Hare

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    Stacia Chappell

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    Raymond Stone

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    Cheryl Wood

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    Anna Franks

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    Kyaw

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    Kristin

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    Heidi

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    Mary Nee

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    Dawn

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