Hot Best Seller

Bonjour Kale: A Memoir of Paris, Love, and Recipes

Availability: Ready to download

A memoir of love, life, and recipes from the woman who brought kale to the City of Light. The story of how one expat woman left her beloved behind when she moved to France-her beloved kale, that is. Unable to find le chou kale anywhere upon moving to the City of Light with her new husband, and despite not really speaking French, Kristen Beddard launched a crusade to single- A memoir of love, life, and recipes from the woman who brought kale to the City of Light. The story of how one expat woman left her beloved behind when she moved to France-her beloved kale, that is. Unable to find le chou kale anywhere upon moving to the City of Light with her new husband, and despite not really speaking French, Kristen Beddard launched a crusade to single-handedly bring kale to the country of croissants and cheese. Infused with Kristen's recipes and some from French chefs, big and small (including Michelin star chef Alain Passard) Bonjour Kale is a humorous, heartfelt memoir of how Kristen, kale, and France collide.


Compare

A memoir of love, life, and recipes from the woman who brought kale to the City of Light. The story of how one expat woman left her beloved behind when she moved to France-her beloved kale, that is. Unable to find le chou kale anywhere upon moving to the City of Light with her new husband, and despite not really speaking French, Kristen Beddard launched a crusade to single- A memoir of love, life, and recipes from the woman who brought kale to the City of Light. The story of how one expat woman left her beloved behind when she moved to France-her beloved kale, that is. Unable to find le chou kale anywhere upon moving to the City of Light with her new husband, and despite not really speaking French, Kristen Beddard launched a crusade to single-handedly bring kale to the country of croissants and cheese. Infused with Kristen's recipes and some from French chefs, big and small (including Michelin star chef Alain Passard) Bonjour Kale is a humorous, heartfelt memoir of how Kristen, kale, and France collide.

30 review for Bonjour Kale: A Memoir of Paris, Love, and Recipes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kristyn - Reading to Unwind

    This book follows the author Kristen as her and her husband travel from NY to France. Kristen had a very organic and vegetable centered eating pattern and when she moved to France she found out that kale was not readily available. Kale had recently taken off in America and was found on every street corner. I enjoyed learning the history of why kale was not readily available in France as well as more about the markets and how they are setup in France. I like that vegetables are sold fresh from fa This book follows the author Kristen as her and her husband travel from NY to France. Kristen had a very organic and vegetable centered eating pattern and when she moved to France she found out that kale was not readily available. Kale had recently taken off in America and was found on every street corner. I enjoyed learning the history of why kale was not readily available in France as well as more about the markets and how they are setup in France. I like that vegetables are sold fresh from farmers and only when in season. I do find it strange in the winter to see so many vegetables readily available at the supermarket and it always makes me question them. I loved how the author was able to take her life story about moving to another country and incorporate it into the book it really made the story feel very honest and heartfelt. Kristen explained the challenges of moving to a foreign country and also gave some basic French expectations that I did not know anything about. The culture that the author was able to bring into the book made me want to keep on reading more. I loved hearing the challenges of learning a new language, culture, as well as trying to find a new job all in one book. The French culture shined through very brightly in this book and would be a perfect read for someone who might be moving to France to learn some important tips. I loved the recipes that the author gave in the book. I enjoyed how she gave details of how the recipe became to be as well as tips when making the item. I loved how she explained the importance of massaging the kale before making a salad, I find kale hard to eat if not steamed or properly prepared so now I have a large amount of new recipes to try. The major item that I didn't love in the book was the length. I felt like about half way through the author accomplished her point and I felt like some sections began to drag on into one another. I felt like some sections could have been combined or it wasn't really information that I needed to know. I would suggest this as a nighttime read. It was perfect to end your day with reaching the journey of one person trying to bring kale to another country.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    I finally finished my foodie Paris books, The Little Paris Kitchen and Bonjour Kale. I've had The Little Paris Kitchen for a while, but I've been saving it to read carefully during Paris in July. I'd hoped to try some of the recipes for Weekend Cooking, but it just didn't happen...maybe next year. Nevertheless, it was fun to browse through stories and recipes as Rachel Khoo proves to us that it doesn't take a fancy kitchen to cook up a little la joie de vivre. I was a little reluctant to try Bon I finally finished my foodie Paris books, The Little Paris Kitchen and Bonjour Kale. I've had The Little Paris Kitchen for a while, but I've been saving it to read carefully during Paris in July. I'd hoped to try some of the recipes for Weekend Cooking, but it just didn't happen...maybe next year. Nevertheless, it was fun to browse through stories and recipes as Rachel Khoo proves to us that it doesn't take a fancy kitchen to cook up a little la joie de vivre. I was a little reluctant to try Bonjour Kale. Yes, I adore Paris, but a story about the woman who reintroduces Paris to kale? Happily, Kristen Beddard is a solid writer, and her passion for kale has convinced me to give this healthy-food vegetable a try. Preferably in Paris, but who knows?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    This book has a rather unusual topic - what does a person do when they uproot themselves, plant themselves in a beautiful European city in which you don't speak the language, and GASP - you cannot find your beloved kale anywhere? In Paris with her brand new husband, Kristen decides to bring Kale to the City of Light come hell or high water - and sometimes a little of both. The book has some humerous tidbits in it as she sets about enlightening the French to the beauty of kale, and, in the end, so This book has a rather unusual topic - what does a person do when they uproot themselves, plant themselves in a beautiful European city in which you don't speak the language, and GASP - you cannot find your beloved kale anywhere? In Paris with her brand new husband, Kristen decides to bring Kale to the City of Light come hell or high water - and sometimes a little of both. The book has some humerous tidbits in it as she sets about enlightening the French to the beauty of kale, and, in the end, some recipes to boot.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ann Mah

    Bonjour Kale made me nostalgic for life in Paris, and all its elegance and eccentricity. With warmth and wit, Kristen Beddard has written a charming story of perseverance and fresh produce!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading Kristen Beddard's memoir and for several reasons too. I'm choosy about the memoirs I read, and was immediately attracted to this one. It's about a young woman and her adventures with food, love and Paris. It's about the expat life, and how she had to adapt to being a newlywed in a foreign country. It reminded me of my parents's immigrant situation when they were young and moved to Canada from Italy. It's also about Kristen's love of the leafy green vegetable kale and I thoroughly enjoyed reading Kristen Beddard's memoir and for several reasons too. I'm choosy about the memoirs I read, and was immediately attracted to this one. It's about a young woman and her adventures with food, love and Paris. It's about the expat life, and how she had to adapt to being a newlywed in a foreign country. It reminded me of my parents's immigrant situation when they were young and moved to Canada from Italy. It's also about Kristen's love of the leafy green vegetable kale and how she pursued a passionate project to make kale available in France. Kristen is a great writer, capturing my interest with her humor and descriptions of her life in New York, the Parisian streets, markets and way of life, interspersed with French words and expressions which I understood. I loved how she included the history of kale, how it became popular and how she reintroduced it in France. Here in Quebec, kale is called chou frisé and is easily found everywhere. I also enjoyed the recipes and was happy that Kristen included tips on how to use kale. I have made kale chips several times, but they never came out as good as when I tried Kristen's recipe. And the key to a good kale salad? You have to massage the dressing into the kale so it marinates the leaves. It's true that this makes the salad tastier. Ever since reading this book, I've made more use of kale instead of just using it daily in my smoothies. And oh, Kristen's descriptions of food and meals at the restaurants interspersed throughout the book made my mouth water. Best of all, I enjoyed Kristen's journey in pursuing something she was passionate about. She left her home and job in America to follow her husband to a country where she did not speak the language. She reinvented herself after going through times of doubt, vulnerability, and self-reflection. She was courageous and accomplished something worthwhile, something that had great meaning in her life and that taught her important things about herself and those around her, including the people and culture of France. Her passion and enthusiasm for kale helped her make friends with others who came to understand her quest -- farmers and chefs. My dad, a gentleman farmer and lover of verdura who owns a large garden plot, started growing kale a few years ago after he learned the nutritious value of kale. Farmers are great people to know. They love the land and growing food is their life in more ways than one. I enjoyed reading about Kristen's interaction with them. If you love memoirs set in France, like stories about the expat life, are a foodie or love to cook, then you will love Bonjour Kale. It's heartwarming, inspiring, fun to read and it's a clean read. It's one of the best books I've read this year.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

    Bonjour Kale is a heartfelt story of starting over in a overly romanticized place, Paris, France. "It's the most beautiful city in the world! What's not to love?" is the instant response. But Beddard delves into a difficult transition from New York career girl about town to the culture shock of moving to a new country without a job or language skills. Kristen recognized something that Paris didn't have (cue in kale) and started a straight-up revolution to bring change to an often static, museum Bonjour Kale is a heartfelt story of starting over in a overly romanticized place, Paris, France. "It's the most beautiful city in the world! What's not to love?" is the instant response. But Beddard delves into a difficult transition from New York career girl about town to the culture shock of moving to a new country without a job or language skills. Kristen recognized something that Paris didn't have (cue in kale) and started a straight-up revolution to bring change to an often static, museum of a city. This is a must-read for anyone who has had to start over again or anyone who dreams to do so. The delicious-sounding recipes animate Beddard's anecdotes along the way.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    This story made me nostalgic for life in France and learning the ropes as an American living there. While Kale doesn't interest me specifically, I appreciated Kristen's passion for it and desire to bring it to the City of Light. I also enjoyed the inclusion of recipes in each chapter and the fluid and easy flow to the book. It gives it a Julia Child feel and has inspired me to attempt some of her creations. Kale chips sound particularly intriguing! I'm hoping that the myriad errors in French and E This story made me nostalgic for life in France and learning the ropes as an American living there. While Kale doesn't interest me specifically, I appreciated Kristen's passion for it and desire to bring it to the City of Light. I also enjoyed the inclusion of recipes in each chapter and the fluid and easy flow to the book. It gives it a Julia Child feel and has inspired me to attempt some of her creations. Kale chips sound particularly intriguing! I'm hoping that the myriad errors in French and English will be remedied before the publication date, particularly the reference to the pronunciation of the name Hermione from Harry Potter.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andie

    Here's another Paris memoir. Goodness! Is there an infinite market for American in Paris fairy tales? I will give author Kristen Beddard points for not being in love with the idea of Paris before she gets there & for doing a realistic job of describing the alienation a person feels not being able to speak the language beyond the level of a two-year old. However, her breathless descriptions on the joys of kale and her messianic quest to reintroduce the green to France was not appealing - maybe bec Here's another Paris memoir. Goodness! Is there an infinite market for American in Paris fairy tales? I will give author Kristen Beddard points for not being in love with the idea of Paris before she gets there & for doing a realistic job of describing the alienation a person feels not being able to speak the language beyond the level of a two-year old. However, her breathless descriptions on the joys of kale and her messianic quest to reintroduce the green to France was not appealing - maybe because I've just never gotten into the whole kale craze. At least it was a quick read. I received an ARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Fascinating and very honest memoir of a New York expat in Paris, about her courageous mission and dedication to kale, despite obstacles found in a new culture and a difficult language. One of the most fascinating memoirs I have read for a while! Plus, it’s about France, Paris, and kale. All good reasons to love Bonjour Kale. my full happy review is here: https://wordsandpeace.com/2017/08/04/... Fascinating and very honest memoir of a New York expat in Paris, about her courageous mission and dedication to kale, despite obstacles found in a new culture and a difficult language. One of the most fascinating memoirs I have read for a while! Plus, it’s about France, Paris, and kale. All good reasons to love Bonjour Kale. my full happy review is here: https://wordsandpeace.com/2017/08/04/...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    What I loved most about this book was that it was about so much more than both Paris and kale! Kristen is a wonderful storyteller and expresses the ups and downs of expat life with grace. On top of that, she found a way to make an impact in the Parisian food scene. A wonderful read with excellent, simple recipes throughout.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Here is a book recommendation for you all, especially my Parisphile friends! Kristen Beddard Heimann,"Bonjour Kale"which was about her project to bring kale to Paris during 2011-13. Her new husband was relocated to Paris and during their time there she decided to create a project. It was very interesting to follow her journey which led her to farmers and chefs and ultimately the press (including the NYTimes). She published it in early 2016 and I met her briefly at Verjus in Paris in May for a boo Here is a book recommendation for you all, especially my Parisphile friends! Kristen Beddard Heimann,"Bonjour Kale"which was about her project to bring kale to Paris during 2011-13. Her new husband was relocated to Paris and during their time there she decided to create a project. It was very interesting to follow her journey which led her to farmers and chefs and ultimately the press (including the NYTimes). She published it in early 2016 and I met her briefly at Verjus in Paris in May for a book reception. I finally sat down to read it this weekend. Oh what a delight this book is! I read it over two days - it's 300 pages and for some super readers here you'd probably devour this in a day and I probably could have as well but I tend to putter a lot even when in the midst of cabin fever (this wkd). Many people she wrote about already were familiar since I used to follow many, many Paris blogs. Remember blogs? This book has lots of lots of recipes, too. For dinner I had sautéed kale after I finished reading it. lol

  12. 5 out of 5

    RivkaBelle

    **2.5 stars I liked it, and then I set it down and had a hard time remembering to pick it back up. It's an interesting story though. And added to my seasonal wanderlust ... Who wants to go to Paris with me? **2.5 stars I liked it, and then I set it down and had a hard time remembering to pick it back up. It's an interesting story though. And added to my seasonal wanderlust ... Who wants to go to Paris with me?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    solid 4 stars Sometimes I walk through the library, waiting for a book to present itself to me. This how I discoveredbonjour kale, and I am so happy that it revealed itself to me. As Kristen Beddard is a Pittsburgh native and a Penn State grad, I felt a bit of kinship. Beyond that, this is a wonderful memoir. At the risk of being predictable, the book is charming.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sami

    This book was a gem! As a self-proclaimed kale lover and bonafide Francophile, I was so excited to happen upon this book that seemed to marry these distinct interests of mine. What I didn’t expect was for the book to be so intensely relatable on a more personal level. As I prepare to get married and move to another country (where I only vaguely speak the language) this year, I connected so closely to Kristen’s explanation of floundering and learning in a brand new culture and community. It gives This book was a gem! As a self-proclaimed kale lover and bonafide Francophile, I was so excited to happen upon this book that seemed to marry these distinct interests of mine. What I didn’t expect was for the book to be so intensely relatable on a more personal level. As I prepare to get married and move to another country (where I only vaguely speak the language) this year, I connected so closely to Kristen’s explanation of floundering and learning in a brand new culture and community. It gives me hope to know that an expat without a plan can find such purpose in a new place. I checked this copy out from the library, but I might need a purchase a copy as a confidence booster in my new home...plus all those recipes sound delicious!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm

    Enjoyed the parts about moving/living in Paris, didn't care about the kale. Not a huge kale fan (salads and/or the occasional smoothie) but I was intrigued by this woman's story of bringing kale to Paris after moving there with her husband. How could such a rich country like France not have kale of all things? So she sets about bringing it back for the French (and her) to enjoy.   I had not been familiar with The Kale Project or what it entails, so I had no clue as to what this woman's story. She Enjoyed the parts about moving/living in Paris, didn't care about the kale. Not a huge kale fan (salads and/or the occasional smoothie) but I was intrigued by this woman's story of bringing kale to Paris after moving there with her husband. How could such a rich country like France not have kale of all things? So she sets about bringing it back for the French (and her) to enjoy.   I had not been familiar with The Kale Project or what it entails, so I had no clue as to what this woman's story. She basically picks up and moves with her English husband to live in France and as part of her adjustment she tries to bring kale by going to gardens, markets, etc. in her search. When she can't find it (or is given the wrong vegetable) she decides to re-introduce the vegetable to France.   There's not much more to say about it. The more enjoyable parts was the first half, where it talks a bit about her life and initial adjustment to France. Although she admits she's not a Francophile, her POV was really refreshing and her story quite readable. But after she starts getting into making kale more available in France and her personal story recedes I definitely wasn't as interested. Although it was fascinating to read her wrestling with French bureaucracy, the language/culture barrier, etc. it was not something I cared passionately about.   What was probably more interesting was that another author, Elaine Sciolino, who pops up at the beginning, gets a mention and then reappears at the end of the book. I had read Sciolino's book, 'La Seduction' that Beddard mentions so that was a fun tie-in for me. It was quite interesting to read though, that Sciolino's offer of help (that Beddard takes up) doesn't happen and yet she appears at the end of the book. I wonder if she had remember talking to the author beforehand? A small detail that really isn't important here but interesting.   I bought this on a whim because it was on sale. Normally I'd be skeptical of such a book, having been burned by too many memoirs of these types for veering into chick-lit, which is just not something I enjoy. But perhaps in combination with the truly awful events of this week plus that I read some "heavy" books topical to what had happened I needed a book like this.   Still, it seems that if one is an expat or thinking of living in France then the first half would be more relevant. If you're into her project or love France AND kale it might be a good read on a rainy day.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Marquis

    Living in France, it was fun for me to find out that the kale I enjoyed for dinner tonight (sautéed with onions and lardons), and last night (added to a white-bean soup), and, quite honestly, pretty much every night I cook for myself, is largely thanks to fellow American Kristen Beddard, a New Yorker who found herself a bit lost in Paris, lacking a job and lamenting the absence of her favorite vegetable. Five years ago, kale was the superfood and comfort food du jour for foodies around the US, b Living in France, it was fun for me to find out that the kale I enjoyed for dinner tonight (sautéed with onions and lardons), and last night (added to a white-bean soup), and, quite honestly, pretty much every night I cook for myself, is largely thanks to fellow American Kristen Beddard, a New Yorker who found herself a bit lost in Paris, lacking a job and lamenting the absence of her favorite vegetable. Five years ago, kale was the superfood and comfort food du jour for foodies around the US, but in France ce n'existait pas. Beddard wondered why. She tentatively made it her mission to find out, and to change that if she could. Spoiler alert: it worked. Her curiosity led her from her favorite market to farms all around France and then to trendy restaurants all around Paris. I appreciate this book most as a business story, a great example of how to identify a need and met it. As for the rest of it: "a memoir of Paris, love, and recipes," I'm less convinced. While the recipes are great (I've tried two), and it's fun to learn of each one's diverse origins (from the author's mother to Alain Passard), I don't think the story quite covers "Paris" and "love" effectively. This title oversells the product–or perhaps represents a different product entirely. When I think of Bonjour Kale, I think of...kale. Yes, the book is mainly set in Paris, and yes, there are charming recollections of mothers and marriages, but title-wise, this book sets itself up to compete with memoirs such as Elizabeth Bard's fabulous Lunch in Paris: A Love Story, with Recipes. In my opinion, it falls short. I would call this book something like: Legume Oublié: One Woman's Quest to Bring Kale to France. The 'American expat stumbling around France' thing has been done before. I think there is room to do it again: but the writing should be really sharp, the observations astute. Foreign words should be included effortlessly, with grace (don't define for readers un petit peu or mon Dieu!: instead, simply provide a bit of context). The author should have something original to say. Beddard has that something (how many other Americans have started a transatlantic initiative for a beloved vegetable?) but her true story gets a bit lost when trying to 'keep up with the Joneses' of the memoir game.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Fluff Smut & Murder

    Thank you to NetGalley.com for an Advanced Reader Copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. I know what you’re thinking - a book about kale? Really? Yes! It’s a crazy memoir about one woman’s journey to bring kale back to France but the writing is so well done with its sprinkling of stories that it was a cute read. Yes, my eyes did glaze over in a few parts about the history of the vegetable, “Bonjour Kale” is worth it. What I loved: I love cooking memoirs so of course I liked the book Thank you to NetGalley.com for an Advanced Reader Copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. I know what you’re thinking - a book about kale? Really? Yes! It’s a crazy memoir about one woman’s journey to bring kale back to France but the writing is so well done with its sprinkling of stories that it was a cute read. Yes, my eyes did glaze over in a few parts about the history of the vegetable, “Bonjour Kale” is worth it. What I loved: I love cooking memoirs so of course I liked the book but I also enjoyed Kristen’s struggles with adjusting to life in France when you don’t speak the language. Sure, would I have preferred her to treat The Kale Project a little more business-like? Yes – how do you not follow up with people who are doing things for you? What I didn’t love: I was all ready to give this book an A- based on the writing and am super excited to try the Secret Sauce recipe in the first few chapters, but then when I got all excited for the Gratin Dauphinois recipe – it was no where to be found in my digital copy along with a ton of other recipes I was looking to make. Boo! I’m not purchasing a book I already read just to get a handful of recipies that deep down, I know I will never make. What I learned: I had no idea the salad bar garnish was so versatile… Overall Grade: Before 6/7/16 B, after 6/7/16 A- ******June 7, 2016 - Because I posted this review on Goodreads.com as well as my own website, I was messaged by Kristen directly for the recipes I wanted. Just now, she messaged me to let me know that the publisher was sending me a brand new copy of the book so that I would have all of the recipes I desired - How amazing is that??? Because of this, I had to change my Overall Grade to what the book truly deserved!****** www.FluffSmutandMurder.com

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liralen

    The idea of loving kale so much that you start a campaign to bring it to your new country of residence...that's a little foreign to me. Nothing against kale, but even when I put this in the context of a vegetable I feel much more strongly about...would I work to introduce Brussels sprouts to a place? Peppers? ...probably not. But Beddard does an entertaining job of recounting her adventures, both as an expat and as someone devoted to finding local sources of kale. On language: One time I thought The idea of loving kale so much that you start a campaign to bring it to your new country of residence...that's a little foreign to me. Nothing against kale, but even when I put this in the context of a vegetable I feel much more strongly about...would I work to introduce Brussels sprouts to a place? Peppers? ...probably not. But Beddard does an entertaining job of recounting her adventures, both as an expat and as someone devoted to finding local sources of kale. On language: One time I thought I'd made an appointment with a dermatologist only to be told by the doctor that he was an anesthesiologist, after I'd showed him the rash on my underarms. He was a cute doctor too (133). And on kale: A young, petite Frenchwoman, she had recently returned to Paris after years of living in New York City, working as a private raw-food chef... "I want to build a business here," she told me... "But how can I coach people on raw food and healthy living and eating if I do not have kale?" (205) I...I am pretty sure that it's possible to be healthy (and, if you want, to eat raw) without the power of kale. And to have a business without it, especially when the vast majority of your clients in France have never heard of kale. But hey—it spurred Beddard on, and the whole thing is a fun read. Beddard started her search (and then her more active quest) at just the right time, it seems, when interest in kale was high enough elsewhere that bringing it to Paris could catch the interest of the media (which presumably also led, directly or indirectly, to this book). It makes for a nice twist on the I-moved-to-Paris subgenre.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eve

    While no one could accuse me of being a passionate kale lover, I am drawn to Parisian memoirs. And this one stands apart from the rest simply because it is about kale. But don’t worry, even though the theme is about one American woman’s search for kale in Paris, it isn’t just about the leafy vegetable. Kale is a metaphor for Beddard’s adjustment to French life and culture. The picture she paints of her early months is bleak and discouraging, a small part of which is the fact that she has trouble While no one could accuse me of being a passionate kale lover, I am drawn to Parisian memoirs. And this one stands apart from the rest simply because it is about kale. But don’t worry, even though the theme is about one American woman’s search for kale in Paris, it isn’t just about the leafy vegetable. Kale is a metaphor for Beddard’s adjustment to French life and culture. The picture she paints of her early months is bleak and discouraging, a small part of which is the fact that she has trouble finding ingredients commonplace in New York, including kale. Jobless and directionless, Beddard decides to bring kale to Paris by convincing local farmers to start growing the leafy green and restaurants and locals to buy it. Beddard’s experiences as a fish out of water in Paris are relatable and I got caught up in the momentum of her passion project. Recipes with a healthy bent (some without a whit of kale) end every chapter. My favorite one is easy and versatile. Called Sharzie’s Secret Sauce (after her mom), I use it a couple of times a week as a salad dressing, drizzled over chicken or vegetables. Sharzie’s Special Sauce Ingredients: 3/8 cup or 6 tablespoons olive oil 3 tbsp Umeboshi vinegar 1 teaspoon dill Combine the olive oil and vinegar in a medium-size jar. Sprinkle the dill into the jar, covering the liquid mixture. Shake vigorously. Taste. If desired, add more dill. Dressing will keep for 2-3 weeks. I’ve made variations of this sauce by substituting white wine vinegar and adding some salt and a squeeze of lemon.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I love books set in Paris especially those stories about ex-pats and their transition into Parisian life. We had many of the same experiences as Kristen and Philip..trouble with carte de sejour...apartment hunting...language barriers. I loved her descriptions of the open markets..of Parc Monceau..the layout of her apartment. The book brought back so many memories and I loved that. However, I do not have the same love of kale. Any vegetable that has to be manipulated, dissected and massaged in or I love books set in Paris especially those stories about ex-pats and their transition into Parisian life. We had many of the same experiences as Kristen and Philip..trouble with carte de sejour...apartment hunting...language barriers. I loved her descriptions of the open markets..of Parc Monceau..the layout of her apartment. The book brought back so many memories and I loved that. However, I do not have the same love of kale. Any vegetable that has to be manipulated, dissected and massaged in order for it to be edible just is not my kind of food. The recipes interspersed throughout the book are also mainly kale (but her vegetable soup recipe is delicious!). I do admire Kristen's quest to bring kale back to Paris through her blog, personal interactions and her Kale Project. She found farmers to grow and sell kale at markets and chefs to prepare it at restaurants. For kale is no longer one of the "forgotten vegetables" and is now able to be purchased! If I only had her initiative when we lived in Paris..not for kale but for American peanut butter!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Susanna Natti

    This is an account of one American woman's quest to re-introduce kale to the French. Years after it became trendy in the United States to eat kale, it was still resisted in France, a "forgotten" food. Kristen Beddard persisted, out of love for the vegetable and out of desperation that her formerly strong self was foundering as a stay-at-home wife living in Paris with her new English husband. She found purpose in being determined to make kale available and despite obstacles, including her difficu This is an account of one American woman's quest to re-introduce kale to the French. Years after it became trendy in the United States to eat kale, it was still resisted in France, a "forgotten" food. Kristen Beddard persisted, out of love for the vegetable and out of desperation that her formerly strong self was foundering as a stay-at-home wife living in Paris with her new English husband. She found purpose in being determined to make kale available and despite obstacles, including her difficulty with the language and dealing with French bureaucracy, she enlists allies along the way. Thanks to her, in no small part, if you're eating in France, either at a restaurant or cooking the kale you've found at the markets, you owe her some thanks. Her memoir is also the story of her marriage, but kale is the star. As the title suggests, it includes recipes. It's a pleasant read, along the lines of Eat, Pray, Love and, being a Francophile and an eater of kale, I was glad to have read it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aurora

    Where I live, I imagine that finding cuisine or specific type of food is as easy as one-two-three. I even take it for granted that if I desire to find a specific type meat or tea, I can easily drive to an ethnic market and buy it there, thus its difficult for me to imagine that prior to 2017, France didn't have any kale. Unlike the author, I only knew kale because it became popular recently and even then I just knew the name; I didn't know it was a cabbage (there are things I don't know) and I a Where I live, I imagine that finding cuisine or specific type of food is as easy as one-two-three. I even take it for granted that if I desire to find a specific type meat or tea, I can easily drive to an ethnic market and buy it there, thus its difficult for me to imagine that prior to 2017, France didn't have any kale. Unlike the author, I only knew kale because it became popular recently and even then I just knew the name; I didn't know it was a cabbage (there are things I don't know) and I also had no idea that kale was so well known prior to 2017. Back to the book, the author has done an amazing job researching things about kale and introducing it to those who are new to the craze as well as making it an exciting fish out of water story about a young woman who has moved to France and the daily struggles she experiences while living life there be it returning things, language barriers or learning the norms of France. I was given this for a honest review

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Fair warning: this was written by my yoga teacher's daughter so I might be a little biased! This was such a delightful, well-written book. A woman from Pittsburgh found herself living in Paris and noticed that the French don't grow or eat kale. She decided to start The Kale Project as a way to bring kale to France. While it's an interesting, quirky idea, the book is about so much more than kale (although there are awesome recipes at the end of each chapter). The author is very open about her mar Fair warning: this was written by my yoga teacher's daughter so I might be a little biased! This was such a delightful, well-written book. A woman from Pittsburgh found herself living in Paris and noticed that the French don't grow or eat kale. She decided to start The Kale Project as a way to bring kale to France. While it's an interesting, quirky idea, the book is about so much more than kale (although there are awesome recipes at the end of each chapter). The author is very open about her marriage, relationships with family and friends, and transitioning to a new country. This book also fit into my newly discovered niche love of books about French eating. I loved it, and I think you should buy it and support a fellow yinzer.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carrol

    Honestly, this is one of the most annoying pieces of food writing I've read. The story is great, and it was the only thing that pushed me to finish the book; I had had enough by page 50 or so. Beddard's depiction of her struggles with dealing with difficult people and situations made me balk-- not everything comes with a simple solution on a silver platter with flowers and ponies. She did no favors for herself with whining about her language woes, either; maybe she was a bit self-deprecating for Honestly, this is one of the most annoying pieces of food writing I've read. The story is great, and it was the only thing that pushed me to finish the book; I had had enough by page 50 or so. Beddard's depiction of her struggles with dealing with difficult people and situations made me balk-- not everything comes with a simple solution on a silver platter with flowers and ponies. She did no favors for herself with whining about her language woes, either; maybe she was a bit self-deprecating for the sake of the book, but geesh, way to perpetuate the stereotype that Americans are dumb and unable to adapt. Again... a worthy story, but maybe would have been more effectively expressed in the third person, by a different writer.

  25. 5 out of 5

    paula_reads

    This is basically an enjoyable feel-good book about bringing kale to Paris and France. It's also the story of an American expat living the dream (is it?) of living in Paris. The author is the typical American abroad... realizing nearly too late that she better learn French and being overly critical of everything French. I'm not sure if she enjoyed her five years there, I can't remember her saying anything positive besides loving Croque Monsieur. But that's not surprising and it still made the bo This is basically an enjoyable feel-good book about bringing kale to Paris and France. It's also the story of an American expat living the dream (is it?) of living in Paris. The author is the typical American abroad... realizing nearly too late that she better learn French and being overly critical of everything French. I'm not sure if she enjoyed her five years there, I can't remember her saying anything positive besides loving Croque Monsieur. But that's not surprising and it still made the book a good read. A bit more self-awareness would've been nice tho. And I hope she'll teach her daughter that it's okay to eat an orange in the Métro if it's stuck underground for hours...even if people might notice you lol

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    This is a fun story of an American moving with her husband to Paris and the surprises and challenges that arise. I love that the author isn't a Francophile to begin with - so her impressions and descriptions are realistic and not overly romanticized. I can't imagine having enough of a commitment to Kale to even notice that Paris didn't have it, let alone set out to change the situation, but I admire the fact that she simply decided to act on something that was meaningful for her. Almost every ch This is a fun story of an American moving with her husband to Paris and the surprises and challenges that arise. I love that the author isn't a Francophile to begin with - so her impressions and descriptions are realistic and not overly romanticized. I can't imagine having enough of a commitment to Kale to even notice that Paris didn't have it, let alone set out to change the situation, but I admire the fact that she simply decided to act on something that was meaningful for her. Almost every chapter ends with a recipe (that includes kale), most of which look pretty simple, and several of which I plan to try right away.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Helena

    First of all, I read this for the whole "American living in Paris" aspect, not the spin on kale, because the truth is that I have yet to find a way to prepare kale that renders it edible (to me or to my family), so I knew I wasn't going to try the recipes in the book. And of course my dislike of kale made it hard to understand why the author was so obsessed with it, but I can put myself in her shoes. While I did enjoy the book, it confirmed that I have very little desire to return to Paris (was First of all, I read this for the whole "American living in Paris" aspect, not the spin on kale, because the truth is that I have yet to find a way to prepare kale that renders it edible (to me or to my family), so I knew I wasn't going to try the recipes in the book. And of course my dislike of kale made it hard to understand why the author was so obsessed with it, but I can put myself in her shoes. While I did enjoy the book, it confirmed that I have very little desire to return to Paris (was there very briefly many years ago).

  28. 5 out of 5

    Eileen Hall

    A lovely memoir of life in Paris by Kristen Beddard. Whilst growing up in America, Kirsten "grew up" with kale. Moving to Paris with her husband she realised that kale was not to be found anywhere, or being mistaken for cabbage, which it isn't. Kristen set about the onerous task of introducing the leafy vegetable to France. This book reads as a memoir, French travel and recipes book rolled into one and should be on everyone's cookery book shelf. I was given a digital copy of this book by the publishe A lovely memoir of life in Paris by Kristen Beddard. Whilst growing up in America, Kirsten "grew up" with kale. Moving to Paris with her husband she realised that kale was not to be found anywhere, or being mistaken for cabbage, which it isn't. Kristen set about the onerous task of introducing the leafy vegetable to France. This book reads as a memoir, French travel and recipes book rolled into one and should be on everyone's cookery book shelf. I was given a digital copy of this book by the publisher Source Books via Netgalley in return for an honest unbiased review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Mcnair

    I was unsure about this book when I started it, but add two things I really like-and you have a winner. Being married to a French man who grew up in Paris, I love learning about the different cultural aspects of a woman who moves to France from the US and her daily revelations and encounters (this is explains why my husband is uncomfortable wearing "sport" clothes out in public) and couple that with the pursuit of a healthy, not so local vegetable. I thoroughly enjoyed this tale of how one woman I was unsure about this book when I started it, but add two things I really like-and you have a winner. Being married to a French man who grew up in Paris, I love learning about the different cultural aspects of a woman who moves to France from the US and her daily revelations and encounters (this is explains why my husband is uncomfortable wearing "sport" clothes out in public) and couple that with the pursuit of a healthy, not so local vegetable. I thoroughly enjoyed this tale of how one woman helped bring Kale to the Parisian people!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dorothy

    I found the book a bit slow at the beginning, but eventually there was a rhythm. Not a surprise to me, though, on the success. A bit predictable, of course, but I also heard about this book on the podcast Paris Paysanne (which is also quite good!) I had the fortune of spending 5 weeks in Paris this past summer and visited a lot of markets, but never once noticed kale. Of course, it's not my favorite vegetable, but the story is not in the vegetable. The story is the quest, the transformation, and I found the book a bit slow at the beginning, but eventually there was a rhythm. Not a surprise to me, though, on the success. A bit predictable, of course, but I also heard about this book on the podcast Paris Paysanne (which is also quite good!) I had the fortune of spending 5 weeks in Paris this past summer and visited a lot of markets, but never once noticed kale. Of course, it's not my favorite vegetable, but the story is not in the vegetable. The story is the quest, the transformation, and the adaptation to a new and wonderful culture.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...