Hot Best Seller

X-Men: The Complete Age of Apocalypse Epic, Book 4

Availability: Ready to download

Learn who lives and who dies in either reality as the apocalyptic arc ends in treachery and tragedy! While certain heroic humans prove their mettle without armor or magic hammers, it's a race to see who the X-Men will destroy first: Apocalypse or themselves! But even with the crisis concluded, new allies and enemies emerge, guaranteeing that reality will still never be the Learn who lives and who dies in either reality as the apocalyptic arc ends in treachery and tragedy! While certain heroic humans prove their mettle without armor or magic hammers, it's a race to see who the X-Men will destroy first: Apocalypse or themselves! But even with the crisis concluded, new allies and enemies emerge, guaranteeing that reality will still never be the same! Featuring the dawn of Gene Nation and a turning point for the Legacy Virus! Collects Generation Next #4, X-Calibre #4, X-Man #4 & #53-54, Factor X #4, Gambit And The X-Ternals #4, Amazing X-Men (1995) #4, Weapon X (1995) #4, X-Universe #2, X-Men: Omega, Blink #4 and X-Men: Prime


Compare

Learn who lives and who dies in either reality as the apocalyptic arc ends in treachery and tragedy! While certain heroic humans prove their mettle without armor or magic hammers, it's a race to see who the X-Men will destroy first: Apocalypse or themselves! But even with the crisis concluded, new allies and enemies emerge, guaranteeing that reality will still never be the Learn who lives and who dies in either reality as the apocalyptic arc ends in treachery and tragedy! While certain heroic humans prove their mettle without armor or magic hammers, it's a race to see who the X-Men will destroy first: Apocalypse or themselves! But even with the crisis concluded, new allies and enemies emerge, guaranteeing that reality will still never be the same! Featuring the dawn of Gene Nation and a turning point for the Legacy Virus! Collects Generation Next #4, X-Calibre #4, X-Man #4 & #53-54, Factor X #4, Gambit And The X-Ternals #4, Amazing X-Men (1995) #4, Weapon X (1995) #4, X-Universe #2, X-Men: Omega, Blink #4 and X-Men: Prime

30 review for X-Men: The Complete Age of Apocalypse Epic, Book 4

  1. 4 out of 5

    Frankh

    "This was never our place, never our time, not really. And if Bishop did his job, we will be but memories by the time the bombs fall. Come to me, my wife, my son. Let me love you...before time slips away...I never would have believed until I met you, beloved, that hope would be so dear to me. But then, a good man once gave me faith that all things were possible. He preached a dream of harmony...and told me any dream worth having is a dream worth fighting for. He taught me well. Had I these lo "This was never our place, never our time, not really. And if Bishop did his job, we will be but memories by the time the bombs fall. Come to me, my wife, my son. Let me love you...before time slips away...I never would have believed until I met you, beloved, that hope would be so dear to me. But then, a good man once gave me faith that all things were possible. He preached a dream of harmony...and told me any dream worth having is a dream worth fighting for. He taught me well. Had I these long years to live over again, I might have made other choices. I might have done many things differently. But I would never have stopped fighting for the dream. That is your legacy, Charles Xavier. Now--as I hold my family to me before the end--I thank you for changing my life." You gotta hand it to Erik Lehnsherr of the Age of Apocalypse story arc; he has been consistent in his Charles-loving, Charles-missing and Charles-monologuing for all the four volumes of this so-called fan-favorite alternate-universe storyline. It's the one thing that never fails to amuse and move me deeply. The soliloquy above definitely takes the Cherik cake and eats it too, honestly. I could not believe how much Magneto pined over Charles Xavier so goddamn hard for this story arc and it has made me immensely giddy as a shipper. It would be an understatement to say that everything that Erik for this alternate universe has become is all because of the loss and sacrifice of his late friend. The moments in between when he just lavishes on the heartache of losing Charles are so telling; especially for a supposedly straight man married to a woman and has a damn kid--whom he, coincidentally, NAMED AFTER HIS DEAD BEST FRIEND. Now I don't know if this was intentional or accidental but, in any case, I THANK Y'ALL PROFUSELY, Scott Lobdell and co., for writing Erik in such a magnificently angsty way every time he mentions Charles or contemplates about life with/without him. It's...unbelievably SHIPPY. It's like you guys did not even bother to be subtle about it, Jesus. This volume collects the last roster composed of: GENERATION NEXT #4, X-CALIBRE #4, X-MAN #4 and #53-54, FACTOR X #4, GAMBIT AND THE X-TERNALS #4, AMAZING X-MEN #4, WEAPON X #4, X-UNIVERSE #2, X-MEN: OMEGA, BLINK #4, and X-MEN: PRIME More on Cherik commentary later. Anyone who has been reading ANY of my X-Men comic book reviews should know by now I WILL ALWAYS TRY TO FIND A WAY TO TALK ABOUT XAVIER/MAGNETO PAIRING so just learn to deal with this quirk, will you? But I'll get back to it again because for now I have to talk about my general evaluation for everything that was grueling and otherwise only slightly enjoyable stories that comprised this landmark nineties saga, Age of Apocalypse. To summarize all of my points from the previous three reviews, here are the important highlights which I hope can help for you to decide whether or not you want to read this for yourself. * If you want something for posterity's sake then go on and pick this up. Be warned, however, that these four volumes of the "complete saga" IS NOT PUBLISHED IN A CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER in spite of what the blurbs might say. Fuck those lying pieces of shit. Reading AoA using these four books will get really annoying because their ordering is fucked. I suggest that you consult online fansites about the recommended reading order and follow that flow instead once you acquire these standard volumes or, better yet, the thousand-plus-paged omnibus. I'm not sure if the omnibus finally got the ordering right. If it didn't either, then srsly, FUCK WHOEVER DECIDED TO PUBLISH THEM OUT-OF-ORDER. That's the most crucial thing to remember about reading AoA. The goddamn out-of-order publication of the issues certainly affected my reading experience for the worst. * In the first volume, it should already be giving me a glimpse of who is Apocalypse and what he is capable of; what he plans to do exactly, and why is he a threat to the world. But all I got are crumbs of these things and the villains who act in his name are at best vaguely represented and under-utilized while others are barely competent. I don't understand the alternate reality that AoA operates in. No amount of world-building is sufficiently spent for readers to imagine and comprehend without the narrative bubbles for that being reduced to eye-rolling purple prose. The only thing I know is the fact that Xavier died so he never founded the X-Men so it was Magneto who took his place instead and now he plays the role of this tortured good guy who laments the lost dream he shared with his late friend while also doing a 'will-they-won't-they' dance with Rogue. * By the 2nd volume, I realized that though Age of Apocalypse is considered to be one of the landmark stories in the X-Men universe, I'm starting to think that it's mostly because it went on and on and on AND ON, spanning for fourteen separate titles over the course of what I assume are two to three years. Quality-wise, I'm not convinced it's a worthy classic. There are just so many stuff going on and most of them don't make sense as a unit. If solely viewed as issues belonging to their respective titles, I suppose they can be excusable but the problem is the references and callbacks about other events from other titles will force you to look back because you can't expect to remember everything clearly while reading through issue after issue of expanded expositions, action scenes that serve no purpose, and what little character and emotional developments that are squeezed in between the action. I can't bring myself to care about the supposedly major scenarios happening because the abruptness of scenes and the overall chopped way the stories are collected just distract me from fully immersing myself in this alternate world. * There are plenty of things to love about the third volume, however, like the fact that certain character relationships were finally allowed to grow. I'm talking about the issues with mother and son, Raven and Kurt; Logan and Jean Grey's doomed yet easy-to-root-for love affair; Gambit's complicated yet intriguing dynamics with the Externals; and Sabretooth and Blink's surrogate father-daughter moments in between. Because that's what makes me read X-Men: THE RELATIONSHIPS in the context of the madness and discrimination, the deaths and the second chances that surround these rag-tag team of lovable freaks. In addition, three characters as individuals stood out for me the most for this volume and they have been performing rather impressively since the second volume began (aside from Magneto who, let's face it, spends a good seventy-percent of his page time pining over Charles): I'm talking about Rogue, Cyclops and Morph. GODDAMN MORPH who serves as a comic relief but who actually gives this fucking story arc an unmistakable heart in its messy core. Rogue here has been placed in stressful positions and yet she always comes up on top. That's my girl right there! Cyclops, on the other hand, actually plays the bad-guy role like a pro (EPIC FORESHADOWING, AMIRITE?) and Morph is so amazingly quirky and inappropriate sometimes but the fact that he always tries to make people laugh in spite of the bad timing of it all doesn't come off insensitive but rather sad and sympathetic. * Also, AoA is the story arc where ERIK LEHNSHERR IS OBVIOUSLY HARBORING STRONG UNREQUITED FEELINGS FOR THE LATE CHARLES XAVIER. My favorite part of Age of Apocalypse--when all is said and done--remains to be Magneto. This version of him is a noble, heroic mentor and founder of the X-Men, and he is quite simply breathtaking in so many ways. His courage, his clear sense of purpose, his vulnerability...everything about this version of Magneto is sympathetic and compelling. Unfortunately, he belongs to an alternate world that in the end had to be erased to prevent Apocalypse from dominating everything. And Erik knows this as well so he selflessly allowed Bishop to travel back in time to fix what has happened during the prelude, Legion Quest. This is very brave and altruistic of him, considering in his world he is considered a savior and a husband and father to Rogue and Baby Charles--but he will sacrifice that if it meant the survival of both human and mutant kind. He believed in a dream worth fighting for but in the end, he also believed some dreams have to be given up and sacrificed in order for something better and long-term to take their place and that is probably the world where Charles Xavier lived to found the X-Men and changed history--even if it is also a world where he, Erik Lehnsherr, is the villain. When nothing else about Age of Apocalypse made any sense for me, I decided to focus more on Magneto's character arc and I believe it's a redemption story for him too that comes full-circle after the painful strife during Fatal Attractions where he was a super-mega-douche asshole. That's the most recommended facet of this storyline for me. Anyway, let's go back to Cherik. As I stated time and time again, Magneto consistently keeps talking about Charles, volunteering the information readily even when no one asked him to, and even when he's under duress while facing Apocalypse himself, or ready to watch the entire world as he knew it get wiped out in the end. What matters for him ultimately is the chance to TALK ABOUT GODDAMN XAVIER: Overall, Age of Apocalypse was not as "epic" as I was led to believe. Some of it is entertaining while others continue to baffle but if you find a way to focus on a specific title or a character then perhaps you could appreciate it more. Either way, reading this has been very confusing at the very least, with some of the issues barely making sense together or having any unifying theme or flow. When they do find the right stride, my annoyance level has already reached its limit that I can't even care as much. Still, this is a 'landmark' X-Men story from the nineties that you must read if you want to be a completeist and all that. Personally, I recommend it because of Magneto's characterization for this arc, especially his undying devotion to his shared dream with Charles Xavier. RECOMMENDED: 7/10 DO READ MY REVIEWS AT:

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wreade1872

    I'm tempted to give this two-stars. There are a lot of good moments, but for every good one, or at least for every 2 good ones there is a bad one. Inconsistent characterization, confusing artwork, bad plotting, pathetic attempts at shock value, unearned attempts at emotional moments, and poor action scenes. Volume 3 is certainly the highmark for this event, mostly because the writers and reader had had enough time to get a handle on events while their was still false hope of continued improvement I'm tempted to give this two-stars. There are a lot of good moments, but for every good one, or at least for every 2 good ones there is a bad one. Inconsistent characterization, confusing artwork, bad plotting, pathetic attempts at shock value, unearned attempts at emotional moments, and poor action scenes. Volume 3 is certainly the highmark for this event, mostly because the writers and reader had had enough time to get a handle on events while their was still false hope of continued improvement. This whole event feels both far too short to allow you to actually care about these versions of the X-men, and far too long since it lasted 3 months, destroying any momentum in the real storylines. Another bizarre choice was telegraphing from the first issues that this while thing was going to be undone with no serious consequences. I mean sure this is comics we knew such an event would be redone but to highlight from the start that this whole thing was going to be meaningless, AND to make that literally the main plotline seems a self-defeating strategy. This final volume also suffers from the writers need to make it seem like an ending, by making it all feel BIG and MEANINGFUL. For example the first 3/4 issues all have narrators, a common trick to try to make an issue feel important. Doesn’t work so well when everyone is using it though. Finally the Age of Apocalypse finishes about 100 pages from the end of this volume the rest is attempted clean-up and trying to put back together the real world continuity while also rewriting it a bit. However the very last couple of X-Man issues where fairly lame even given my penchants for the Summer’s clan. Overall, it had its moments but glad to be done with it. Or i will be when the messy bits and pieces its left behind are finally erased.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    And so the epic comes to an end… not with a bang, but not to shabby either. Like Secret Wars II, the creators ensure that the events in this alternate reality spill over into the Marvel Universe thus making an integral part of continuity :) Collects X-Calibre #4, Generation Next #4, X-Man #4, Factor X #4, Amazing X-Men #4, Gambit & The Externals #4, X-Universe #2, X-Men: Omega and X-Men Prime. And so the epic comes to an end… not with a bang, but not to shabby either. Like Secret Wars II, the creators ensure that the events in this alternate reality spill over into the Marvel Universe thus making an integral part of continuity :) Collects X-Calibre #4, Generation Next #4, X-Man #4, Factor X #4, Amazing X-Men #4, Gambit & The Externals #4, X-Universe #2, X-Men: Omega and X-Men Prime.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Uys

    The stunning conclusion to the Age of Apocalypse event, this GN also contains some of the "bleed-over" material as X-Man and other characters find their way to the 616 (main) Marvel Universe. Definitely a must read for fans of the X-Men and those interested in discovering more about Apocalypse ahead of the already planned followed up to the X-Men Days of Future Past movie! The stunning conclusion to the Age of Apocalypse event, this GN also contains some of the "bleed-over" material as X-Man and other characters find their way to the 616 (main) Marvel Universe. Definitely a must read for fans of the X-Men and those interested in discovering more about Apocalypse ahead of the already planned followed up to the X-Men Days of Future Past movie!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alex E

    All the pieces are in place for the downfall of Apocalypse. Where the previous three volumes sometimes felt disconnected or fragmented at times, this one completely focuses all the titles to streamline towards the ending. All the teams meet up in the end, all have their final moves planned out, and the final battle begins. In a way, it was a little sad to watch it end. The alternate universe that the writers created was, while at times devastatingly dark, ripe with storytelling possibilities. Th All the pieces are in place for the downfall of Apocalypse. Where the previous three volumes sometimes felt disconnected or fragmented at times, this one completely focuses all the titles to streamline towards the ending. All the teams meet up in the end, all have their final moves planned out, and the final battle begins. In a way, it was a little sad to watch it end. The alternate universe that the writers created was, while at times devastatingly dark, ripe with storytelling possibilities. They could have chose to linger in this world to tell the stories of the people living in it, but at the same time, it felt like a good amount of time had passed where the status quo returning felt right. Part of what makes this storyline so great is the art. From Joe Mad, to the Kubert bros, to John Romita, and the others... everyone did such great work on bringing this world to life. They conveyed the right tone for the stories, and created and atmosphere where you felt the oppressive nature of Apocalypse's world. On the art side of things, this was some of my favorite artwork from the X-Men era in the 90's. Overall, it's easy to see why this is one of the more acclaimed storylines from the X-Men's history. It is a "elseworlds" type tale done right. If you haven't read this, definitely start with Legion Quest and enjoy the ride.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Asilef

    What a letdown. The entire series, I mean. In this particular book, every story ended with, "To be concluded in X-Men Omega." So of course (stupidly), I thought X-Men Omega would be this grand moment I've been waiting to read, but...nah. The entire X-Man and X-Calibre books were total wastes. They served no purpose whatsoever, except to get that $MarvelMoney$. I wish whoever put these books together had left out X-Man and X-Calibre, and included more of the stories that actually mattered. I may b What a letdown. The entire series, I mean. In this particular book, every story ended with, "To be concluded in X-Men Omega." So of course (stupidly), I thought X-Men Omega would be this grand moment I've been waiting to read, but...nah. The entire X-Man and X-Calibre books were total wastes. They served no purpose whatsoever, except to get that $MarvelMoney$. I wish whoever put these books together had left out X-Man and X-Calibre, and included more of the stories that actually mattered. I may be being nitpicky, but The Greatest Telepath Ever Whom Magneto Desperately Needs To Find didn't really need to be found. The outcome didn't hinge on Nate's shoulders like it was made out to. The Greatest Seer Ever Who Desperately Needs To Be Found So She Can Read Bishop was so contrived it almost makes me angry. But like I said, $MarvelMoney$. I feel like the entire AoA saga was a huge waste of time. I'm not glad I read it. It makes no impact on the X universe as it stands now. Just...bleehhh. I do not recommend.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Givens

    An excellent and satisfying end to such a complex story! I don't like the aftermath issues, though -- the choice seems pretty random. Why not end with an epilogue issue back in the main continuity, and then start aftermath in a new volume? That would be way more effective and less confusing. Still, nothing will make me stop loving this arc. An excellent and satisfying end to such a complex story! I don't like the aftermath issues, though -- the choice seems pretty random. Why not end with an epilogue issue back in the main continuity, and then start aftermath in a new volume? That would be way more effective and less confusing. Still, nothing will make me stop loving this arc.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alli

    Nice to see all the missions and storylines come together in a way that makes sense (I was a little worried, I admit). I now understand why X-fans have gone nuts for this AU storyline! I also particularly loved how the human characters (Avengers, et al) fit into this installment.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Robert Kirwan

    Great ending to the series!!! Really liked the artwork in every issue. The two chronicles issues were the weakest for me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    Full disclosure: as a child, I was a huge fan of the Age of Apocalypse story arc. Unfortunately, I was never able to read the entire arc, as I didn't have access to all of the comics. Now, almost 20 years later, I have finally finished the arc. I still appreciate it as much as I did when I was younger, maybe a bit more because I am old enough to grasp the concept of the various timelines and what is going on within each one. That being said, it does still get confusing at times. SPOILERS AHEAD. D Full disclosure: as a child, I was a huge fan of the Age of Apocalypse story arc. Unfortunately, I was never able to read the entire arc, as I didn't have access to all of the comics. Now, almost 20 years later, I have finally finished the arc. I still appreciate it as much as I did when I was younger, maybe a bit more because I am old enough to grasp the concept of the various timelines and what is going on within each one. That being said, it does still get confusing at times. SPOILERS AHEAD. DO NOT READ PAST THIS POINT IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO BE SPOILED. This is my least favorite of the books. Everything finally concludes here, but it takes forever for the story to reach its ending, there is no real climax, and I found myself flipping though the pages in an attempt to reach the conclusion. Each issue promised a conclusion if you kept reading, but it dragged on so much that by the time I reached the actual conclusion, I was more relieved than anything else. I was just glad that it was over. The end stories, which take place after the Age of Apocalypse ends, didn't need to be included. Unless you plan on finding the respective comics, there's really no need to read them. I should also point out that you will be very lost while reading this arc if you don't have at least a basic knowledge of X-Men/Marvel and the characters. Don't get me wrong, I like seeing characters in roles they wouldn't normally be in, but it's a little hard to understand and keep up with if you don't know anything. This edition felt very convoluted and sloppy, as well. It felt less like an actual story with a purpose and more like a collection of different stories, all thrown in the same pot, leaving the reader to try and sort it out. I was a little disappointed. None of the volumes really tie in all that well, but this one is the worst in my opinion. It was hard to keep up with what was going on sometimes, and the art work didn't really provide many answers. For example, we see Ben Grimm taking off with the baby that they rescued, seemingly getting to a safe place. The next time we see Ben, he is sitting in a chair on an airplane with the baby on his lap, blood splatter all over his clothes. He is dead. We are given no explanation as to how this happened, and it is glossed over quickly. I did love the AoA, and I still do, but the conclusion was a bit disappointing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael Church

    This kind of went both ways for me. On the upside, they actually managed to me care about the kids in Generation Next. And the rising action to the conclusion was pretty thrilling. The stories here were all finally going in one direction and there were a number of resolutions that you get to see. Even the art in a couple of issues started to impress me. Everything still looked pretty dated, but there were some nicely done pages and panels. Personally, I took a little issue with the resolution of This kind of went both ways for me. On the upside, they actually managed to me care about the kids in Generation Next. And the rising action to the conclusion was pretty thrilling. The stories here were all finally going in one direction and there were a number of resolutions that you get to see. Even the art in a couple of issues started to impress me. Everything still looked pretty dated, but there were some nicely done pages and panels. Personally, I took a little issue with the resolution of the story. Given that this was called the "complete" story, I was hoping to see everyone end up where they were in Uncanny X-Force when I met these characters. It didn't actually take you to that point. Besides that, it just didn't all make sense. I mean...the point of string theory is that you have a new reality for every different decision that could be made. Certain ones are insignificant but other times you end up with a truly separate reality. The death of Xavier is apparently something significant. Just because it didn't happen that time doesn't mean it didn't happen. It just doesn't really work for me. Unless they did something leading into this series that pointed out the 616 reality was changing over to a new one or something. The main issue I had with the art style was that things were so unclear. You could never really see the progression of someone through a scene or something. And when things happened you had some issues really being able to tell what was going on. Ok so overall, yeah this was an epic story, but there were huge chunks that didn't make sense and that just were barely fleshed out. It just expected you to take it at face value. And then, the last two chapters had almost nothing to do with the rest of the story. I mean it involved X-Man but it didn't link up at all. It jumped from issue 4 to issue like 52. There's also a weird issue with the main universe after Bishop fixes AoA that just doesn't really fit either. I was just really disappointed with this whole thing. It's a part of comic history but it really kind of blows.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jason Owen

    The Age of Apocalypse was one of those crazy Marvel X-Men crossovers that basically took place every year and, in my opinion, I think it was the best one. It didn't necessarily have any universe altering events, outside of introducing a few characters into the regular Marvel universe, but most the books were well written. Despite the fact that there are something like 30-40 books total for the crossover, they all seemed to gel and flow together, providing interesting stories for the individual b The Age of Apocalypse was one of those crazy Marvel X-Men crossovers that basically took place every year and, in my opinion, I think it was the best one. It didn't necessarily have any universe altering events, outside of introducing a few characters into the regular Marvel universe, but most the books were well written. Despite the fact that there are something like 30-40 books total for the crossover, they all seemed to gel and flow together, providing interesting stories for the individual books, but also adding to the newly created universe as a whole. And it culminates into a final, fatal battle between the hero Magneto and the villian, Apocalypse, in one of my most memorable moments in comics.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    The conclusion of the Age of Apocalypse Epic was more satisfying than the beginning, but as I wrote in my review of X-Men: The Complete Age of Apocalypse Epic Book 3 the whole endeavor was a mixed bag. With so many writers over so many titles, the plot line was a bit of a mess. The best bits were a meditation on the nature of sacrifice and heroism in the face of an unforgiving world. Good superhero comic fare, but not great works which comics occasionally rise to. The conclusion of the Age of Apocalypse Epic was more satisfying than the beginning, but as I wrote in my review of X-Men: The Complete Age of Apocalypse Epic Book 3 the whole endeavor was a mixed bag. With so many writers over so many titles, the plot line was a bit of a mess. The best bits were a meditation on the nature of sacrifice and heroism in the face of an unforgiving world. Good superhero comic fare, but not great works which comics occasionally rise to.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Blake Strother

    After completing this series, I am giving this volume the lowest rating because I really expected a better ending. The ending of the alternate universe was not terrible but some of the issues included in the follow-up seemed a little out of place and uninteresting. However, I will simply conclude saying this was decent iconic series that I am glad I spent some time reading. For the average Marvel fan this is an enjoyable read. My only warning is that like most X-Men story lines, the complexity c After completing this series, I am giving this volume the lowest rating because I really expected a better ending. The ending of the alternate universe was not terrible but some of the issues included in the follow-up seemed a little out of place and uninteresting. However, I will simply conclude saying this was decent iconic series that I am glad I spent some time reading. For the average Marvel fan this is an enjoyable read. My only warning is that like most X-Men story lines, the complexity can be both a blessing a curse, leading to some entertaining twists and turns and ALSO very convoluted timelines.

  15. 5 out of 5

    M.i.

    With the upcoming x-men movie coming out, I thought this would be a great way to catch up on whats to come. I wasn't disappointed, but I felt the way the stories were arranged makes this somewhat hard to keep up with. Enjoyable though, and it depicts just how much of a threat Apocalypse is to the Marvel universe. With the upcoming x-men movie coming out, I thought this would be a great way to catch up on whats to come. I wasn't disappointed, but I felt the way the stories were arranged makes this somewhat hard to keep up with. Enjoyable though, and it depicts just how much of a threat Apocalypse is to the Marvel universe.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Deirdre

    The Age of Apocalypse saga draws to a close and people have to choose what side they are going to be on. More and more it looks like its going to be difficult to survive and a hope for a better world lives in the hearts of the x-men.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Oh thank God it's over. I haven't read too many recent X-Titles, but I know the art and writing can only go up from here. Oh thank God it's over. I haven't read too many recent X-Titles, but I know the art and writing can only go up from here.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    The story concludes, with a dramatic "well, that happened." Man, I do not miss the 90's. The story concludes, with a dramatic "well, that happened." Man, I do not miss the 90's.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    This was perhaps one of my favorite crossover events. The X-Men are completely reimagined in a dystopian world ruled by mutants. Professor X is killed in the past by his son allowing Apocalypse to conquer North America and start a global genetic war. Magento eventually forms the X-Men to protect humans and bring an end to the reign of terror. Every X-Men series was stopped in 1995 for four months and replaced with an Age of Apocalypse title. Yes, it was incredibly gimmicky, but it was also compl This was perhaps one of my favorite crossover events. The X-Men are completely reimagined in a dystopian world ruled by mutants. Professor X is killed in the past by his son allowing Apocalypse to conquer North America and start a global genetic war. Magento eventually forms the X-Men to protect humans and bring an end to the reign of terror. Every X-Men series was stopped in 1995 for four months and replaced with an Age of Apocalypse title. Yes, it was incredibly gimmicky, but it was also completely immersive. Each of the X-Men teams and their allies completes their various missions to discover the truth about their reality and find the pieces needed to return it to "normal". It culminates in a final showdown with Apocalypse in a final desperate gambit to save humanity. This collects Generation Next #4, X-Calibre #4, X-Man #4, Factor X #4, Gambit And The X-Ternals #4, Amazing X-Men #4, Weapon X #4, X-Universe #2, and X-Men: Omega.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    As the 4 volumes go along they become more and more coherent. That definitely benefits this final collection. It's not perfect and I think it's clear the industry as a whole has learned a lot about how to do these events. I'm a little disappointed in the actual mechanics of how Apocalypse is finally taken down, but thematically and character-wise all the major actions land fairly well. As the 4 volumes go along they become more and more coherent. That definitely benefits this final collection. It's not perfect and I think it's clear the industry as a whole has learned a lot about how to do these events. I'm a little disappointed in the actual mechanics of how Apocalypse is finally taken down, but thematically and character-wise all the major actions land fairly well.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Steve Clark

    I did enjoy this, but I probably needed to read more of the series to know who the characters are and what was going on.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Datagu

    the comic is really fantastic.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    Volume IV of this X-Men saga provides an awesome conclusion to one of my favorite story arcs. In a different world, where Charles Xavier died and the X-Men never formed, a mutant named Apocalypse rose up and assumed control of the world, leading mutants against humans in a savage battle of "suvival of the fittest". The world is filled with familiar faces but no one is as you remember them. In this final volume, all of Magneto's plans are coming together in a final attempt to bring an end Apocaly Volume IV of this X-Men saga provides an awesome conclusion to one of my favorite story arcs. In a different world, where Charles Xavier died and the X-Men never formed, a mutant named Apocalypse rose up and assumed control of the world, leading mutants against humans in a savage battle of "suvival of the fittest". The world is filled with familiar faces but no one is as you remember them. In this final volume, all of Magneto's plans are coming together in a final attempt to bring an end Apocalypse's reign. The series incorporates issues from Generation Next, Weapon X, The Amazing X-Men, and more. Everyone has a role to play in the world where Apocalypse rules and one of the best aspects is seeing how the characters have changed in a world without Xavier's influence. Magneto and Rogue have a son together and lead the modern incarnation of the "X-Men". Cyclops was once a Prelate working for Apocalypse himself and Beast was one of Apocalypse's top genetic scientists, performing horrible experiments on mutant and human prisoners. Though, as much as I enjoyed the Age of Apocalypse issues, my favorite issue included in this collection would most likely be X-Men Prime, which gives us a glimpse into the regular Marvel universe after the events in the Apocalypse timeline unfolded and introduces the Legacy Virus as it's existence is made public, starting a whole new storyline. Everything comes together in this collection as Colossus and Shadowcat lead an assault on the power core that ends in tragedy, Nate Summers confronts Mister Sinister about the truth of his past, Cyclops and Jean free the prisoners from the pens before the potential test subjects can be slaughtered, and more. One interesting inclusion I found in this saga was that of X-Universe, which follows the events surround the humans and their part in the saga. This angle included non-X-Men characters and explained where their fate took them with Apocalypse's existence (i.e. the Fantastic Four never became fantastic). The Age of Apocalypse saga is a must read for any X-Men fan. It's story is engaging, the artwork is fantastic, and, if you're like me, you'll have a hard time putting this collection down until you reach the end. I just wish they had put VOLUME 4 somewhere on the book over than the tiny notation on the spine; it was a bit frustrating when I got it home and realized that it was not, in fact, the complete epic as advertised on the front...but the last 25% of it. So, avoid making the same mistake and try to enjoy this saga from the beginning.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Harris

    This wraps up the original Age of Apocalypse storyline, which is packed with action, shocks, and twists right up to the explosive end! For those who don't know anything about the AoA (and haven't read my other related reviews on the previous books in this series), it's all about how what became of the world when Charles Xavier was killed twenty years in the past, Apocalypse took over North America, and Magneto formed the X-Men himself to try to stop him. Below, I'll break down what happens in ea This wraps up the original Age of Apocalypse storyline, which is packed with action, shocks, and twists right up to the explosive end! For those who don't know anything about the AoA (and haven't read my other related reviews on the previous books in this series), it's all about how what became of the world when Charles Xavier was killed twenty years in the past, Apocalypse took over North America, and Magneto formed the X-Men himself to try to stop him. Below, I'll break down what happens in each part of this fourth and final installment in these trade paperback collections without spoiling anything too major. Generation Next #4 - The youngest X-Men's search for Illyana Rasputin comes to a head, and ends tragically. X-Calibre #4 - Just when Nightcrawler thinks he won't be able to convince Destiny to accompany him back to New York, the Shadow King arrives to cause even more carnage. X-Man #4 - The real villain of the piece shows his true colors, revealing the secret truths behind Nate Grey's origins, and leading to a dramatic battle that leads right into X-Men: Omega. Issues #53-54 of the series are also included, which is a little confusing, but since the involve a tie-in to the AoA, I get why they're in here. Factor-X #4 - Cyclops and Jean Grey race against time to liberate the pens and stop a nuclear holocaust. Gambit & the X-Ternals #4 - Gambit and his teammates discover a traitor in their midst and try to escape Rictor's wrath in order to get the M'Kraan Crystal shard back to Magneto. Amazing X-Men #4 - Quicksilver, Storm, and Banshee go on a desperate trip to Canada to try to rescue Bishop from the Madri, and then regroup with the rest of the X-Men to try and save the day. Weapon X #4 - Logan has a final confrontation with a villain he thought was dead, as he leads the Human High Council's armada into the heart of Apocalypse's empire. X-Universe #2 - This wraps up the rest of the Marvel Universe's heroes' struggles against Apocalypse's "lost" horseman, Mikhail Rasputin. X-Men: Omega - Apocalypse's forces and Magneto's X-Men have their final, incredible battle, which is sufficiently epic in its scope to be a fitting conclusion to the original Age of Apocalypse storyline. Blink #4 - This is actually just one small portion of the issue, which shows what happens to Blink that leads her into the Exiles' world. X-Men: Prime - This takes us back to the main Marvel Universe, and serves as a springboard into the remainder of the X-storylines in 1995 and beyond! Again... if you haven't read the Age of Apocalypse Epic, READ IT!!!

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

    An astonishing accomplishment. Now I can understand why X-Men Age of Apocalypse is so wonderful. It took a bit of work on my part as a reader. Since this past summer I've been working my way through Uncanny X-men and related titles to fill in my Gap Years, those I'd never read after dropping comics as an older teen-ager/college student. Roughly spanning 1981- where we are now in 1995 with this volume. Let me first admit, I attempted reading A of A a couple of years ago and couldn't get past date An astonishing accomplishment. Now I can understand why X-Men Age of Apocalypse is so wonderful. It took a bit of work on my part as a reader. Since this past summer I've been working my way through Uncanny X-men and related titles to fill in my Gap Years, those I'd never read after dropping comics as an older teen-ager/college student. Roughly spanning 1981- where we are now in 1995 with this volume. Let me first admit, I attempted reading A of A a couple of years ago and couldn't get past dated-ness of the whole thing. And it also seemed a bit difficult to get into. What a fool I was. X-Men: Age of Apocalypse Prelude, the book, got me over the difficult to get into thing. The dated-ness fell apart having read the preceding 14 years of the X-Universe. And wow! What a creative explosion of talent: in a couple of senses. It's an enormous Marvel event quite unlike anything that's come before it. It's utterly, wholly original. There's also a bevvy of new artists. Artists who are now among Marvel's upper echelon. 5 years into the decade and the 90's have finally arrived. We're finally really and truly reaping the benefit of computers in art, lettering and most of all color. There's a color explosion going on. A huge stark contrast to 80's books that seemed to want to use as few as colors as possible. X-Men: Age of Apocalypse, the main story is told now across three trade paperback. They are lovely editions and a slight improvement on the earlier one. In the trades Dawn and Twilight you get the extras but you can skip them if you wish. Dawn has the Blink mini-series and I'd recommend it. The main story is an epic feast that you'll want to rip through like any good page turner. I do recommend starting with the OOP X-Men: Age of Apocalypse Prelude. It's a much better beginning to the story than what you will find in either the trades or the Omnibus. Oh, yeah. I totally loved it. Especially Blink, Creed and Morph. Now I get why the Exiles are so beloved. Well, other than being stars of a great series of their own.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Guillermo

    And so concludes the epic that I never came around to finishing as a teenager - with the bad guys losing (except for those who got away) and the heroes winning (only to watch the world they know end). Much like book one, the final collection of the Age of Apocalypse epic contains what I'd like to call filler - stories related to the epic, but not a part of it. It collects the fourth and final issues of Generation Next, X-Calibre, Factor X, Gambit and the X-Ternals, Amazing X-Men, Weapon X, X-Man And so concludes the epic that I never came around to finishing as a teenager - with the bad guys losing (except for those who got away) and the heroes winning (only to watch the world they know end). Much like book one, the final collection of the Age of Apocalypse epic contains what I'd like to call filler - stories related to the epic, but not a part of it. It collects the fourth and final issues of Generation Next, X-Calibre, Factor X, Gambit and the X-Ternals, Amazing X-Men, Weapon X, X-Man #4 & 53-54, X-Universe #2, X-Men: Omega, X-Men: Prime, and Blink #4 (for some odd reason, as it is also featured in book one, but it's quite possibly the last four pages of the final issue). What can I say about this collection? While most of it's worth the read, I ignored Blink and the other two issues of X-Man. The writing is magnificent and the art is stellar - there is not disappointment here! The stories are heartbreaking - especially the collection opener of Generation Next. Again, we are hit with the choices our heroes and villains make in this world. And how, no matter how much we distance ourselves from the conflict, we will have to make a decision in the end. Sometimes it's for the better and sometimes it's for our undoing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Munroe

    Oh my god, you guys, this comic is hilariously dated. It is GUN and it is GRIMACE, it is POUCHES and PUNCHES and OVER-EXAGGERATED MUSCULATURE, X-TREME spelling and grammar and conversations between characters who refuse to face one another, choosing instead to face front like the cast of a bad high school play. In 1995 I was all up for this, but with the benefit of hindsight, I blush at some of the more over-the-top elements presented here. That said, Age of Apocalypse is the '90s X-Family crossov Oh my god, you guys, this comic is hilariously dated. It is GUN and it is GRIMACE, it is POUCHES and PUNCHES and OVER-EXAGGERATED MUSCULATURE, X-TREME spelling and grammar and conversations between characters who refuse to face one another, choosing instead to face front like the cast of a bad high school play. In 1995 I was all up for this, but with the benefit of hindsight, I blush at some of the more over-the-top elements presented here. That said, Age of Apocalypse is the '90s X-Family crossover that's remembered most fondly for a reason, and for the most part it does hold up. There's real ambition and scope here, in a narrative sense, and some of the recontextualizations of characters I already know and love were fascinating to walk through. And when the disparate pieces do finally come together in the third act, it's presented in a way I found tremendously satisfying. I don't know how much of my enjoyment here is nostalgic in nature, but I suspect that even if I were reading this run for the first time I'd find it an interesting bit of counterfactual worldbuilding, and a compelling read to boot, once I got past the very specifically '90s tropes and idioms.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Oliver Hodson

    This was indeed one of those rare crossovers where you wanted them to stay in the crossover longer. I have always been more impressed by apocalypse than interested though, and that probably comes through in his villainy here- other players like havok are more interesting than his dark lord. Although some heroes redemptions were interesting like cyclops and warren's there were too many redemptions just because the character was a hero in the other reality. Beast was evil and should have remained This was indeed one of those rare crossovers where you wanted them to stay in the crossover longer. I have always been more impressed by apocalypse than interested though, and that probably comes through in his villainy here- other players like havok are more interesting than his dark lord. Although some heroes redemptions were interesting like cyclops and warren's there were too many redemptions just because the character was a hero in the other reality. Beast was evil and should have remained so (or if he came back don't donit as an aside) and i would have preferred jean and scott's chemistry to remain unrequited and her to stick with logan more definitively. I mean the whole beauty of AofA was that it gave vitality and flexibility to the x-universe and then you spend a fair bit of it making certain it is like the original universe. But overall, a great journey and well worth the effort of reading the complete epic!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    The final book of the original Age of Apocalypse series with more wonderful artwork and gripping action, this graphic novel is the often grim conclusion to one of the most popular X-Men Saga’s of all time. As all the running scenarios in this dimension come to a close you encounter desperate bids for survival and a great many sacrifices in an attempt to overthrow Apocalypse. There are some moments which are nothing short of tragic specifically in the X-Men Omega: Endings comic. The finale to this The final book of the original Age of Apocalypse series with more wonderful artwork and gripping action, this graphic novel is the often grim conclusion to one of the most popular X-Men Saga’s of all time. As all the running scenarios in this dimension come to a close you encounter desperate bids for survival and a great many sacrifices in an attempt to overthrow Apocalypse. There are some moments which are nothing short of tragic specifically in the X-Men Omega: Endings comic. The finale to this saga has been done very well and was definitely worth persevering for (if like me you lost a little interest in the 3rd book). As a compilation the series contains a lot of ‘filler’ material however the main basis is fantastic.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sadie-Jane Alexis Nunis

    Obviously u need to read the earlier volumes to have a better understanding of what's going on.. However, it doesn't mean you can't enjoy the glorious art that fills the Pages... One of the better compilations in my opinion. The feature with blink was lost on me.. maybe the pages were missing? I did borrow this from the library... but the pages were far too few and I scratched my head trying to figure out why they were even in there.. Obviously u need to read the earlier volumes to have a better understanding of what's going on.. However, it doesn't mean you can't enjoy the glorious art that fills the Pages... One of the better compilations in my opinion. The feature with blink was lost on me.. maybe the pages were missing? I did borrow this from the library... but the pages were far too few and I scratched my head trying to figure out why they were even in there..

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...