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Test Cricket: The unauthorised biography

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Test Cricket is an odyssey into cricket’s heart and history, filled with heroes, villains, laughter, tears, bats and balls. No subject has escaped cricket writer and filmmaker Jarrod Kimber in his chronicling of Test match cricket. He takes cricket fans through all the seismic events in cricket’s tragicomic history, from its accidental birth to its run-in with death. Lords, Test Cricket is an odyssey into cricket’s heart and history, filled with heroes, villains, laughter, tears, bats and balls. No subject has escaped cricket writer and filmmaker Jarrod Kimber in his chronicling of Test match cricket. He takes cricket fans through all the seismic events in cricket’s tragicomic history, from its accidental birth to its run-in with death. Lords, maharajahs and refugees have all played the game that has survived many wars, corruption and terrorism to still be standing – still be captivating – today. Cricket has been dented by history, evolved by nature, grown entire nations and had to fight just to remain. This is not just the story of the people who played the game; this is Test cricket’s story.


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Test Cricket is an odyssey into cricket’s heart and history, filled with heroes, villains, laughter, tears, bats and balls. No subject has escaped cricket writer and filmmaker Jarrod Kimber in his chronicling of Test match cricket. He takes cricket fans through all the seismic events in cricket’s tragicomic history, from its accidental birth to its run-in with death. Lords, Test Cricket is an odyssey into cricket’s heart and history, filled with heroes, villains, laughter, tears, bats and balls. No subject has escaped cricket writer and filmmaker Jarrod Kimber in his chronicling of Test match cricket. He takes cricket fans through all the seismic events in cricket’s tragicomic history, from its accidental birth to its run-in with death. Lords, maharajahs and refugees have all played the game that has survived many wars, corruption and terrorism to still be standing – still be captivating – today. Cricket has been dented by history, evolved by nature, grown entire nations and had to fight just to remain. This is not just the story of the people who played the game; this is Test cricket’s story.

30 review for Test Cricket: The unauthorised biography

  1. 4 out of 5

    Abhishek Mukherjee

    Test Cricket — the Unauthorised Biography is not the best cricket book ever written. But it is an important cricket book, a necessary one for the generation known for treating history of the sport with supreme disdain. It is about the glorious past of the sport, from the 1800s to the 1900s to World Cup 2015, all written in neat little chapters, to be consumed even by the casual reader at a a-chapter-a-day pace. It is just that Kimber does not let you stop at a single chapter. He makes you read on Test Cricket — the Unauthorised Biography is not the best cricket book ever written. But it is an important cricket book, a necessary one for the generation known for treating history of the sport with supreme disdain. It is about the glorious past of the sport, from the 1800s to the 1900s to World Cup 2015, all written in neat little chapters, to be consumed even by the casual reader at a a-chapter-a-day pace. It is just that Kimber does not let you stop at a single chapter. He makes you read on, for his style is inimitable, especially among contemporaries. And then, there are little snippets throughout the book, providing interesting bits of trivia. If there is a collection on cricket quotes from the 21st century, Kimber may account for a chunk of it. Do sample a few: On heavy scoring in the 1930s: “By the 1930s batsmen were clocking cricket like it was some flawed 1980s video game.” “Procter bowled chest front on, holding the ball in both hands, and then a windmill action. It was like he bowled the ball twice, and off the wrong foot both times. Even if he did bowl two balls, you still wouldn’t have hit either of them.” On Bodyline: “A cricketing act of beautiful bastardry.” On Sabina Park, 1975-76: “The scoreboard read 3/273. But it was written in blood.” “Richard Hadlee seemed to pop out of a 1920s film and straight into the bowling crease.” “When the ball was outside off stump, Greenidge played it like it had slept with his sister.” On the Ws: “All three delivered by the same midwife. Of all the midwives who have helped deliver cricketers, she surely had the softest hands.” “Adam Gilchrist is a nice man. But what that nice man did to the bowlers of the world was a crime.” “While Australia was building one of the best empires in cricket, India went about owning the whole planet of cricket.” I can go on, but I will probably be sued under copyright law or something similar for over-quoting. All in all, it is a must-read for every cricket-lover. For the casual fan, this is your most concise portal to names you have only heard of. For the enthusiastic student, this can be your handbook as long as the sport stays with you. And as for the historian, you will find yourself nodding and smiling as you read on. There are a few minor errors (typographical or otherwise), but they will certainly be rectified in the second edition — which, I presume, is not too far away.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Prathamesh Deshpande

    I have been a fan of Jarrod Kimber for quiet some time now. His blogs, podcasts and videos full of analytics are brilliant to say the least. This book is just one more product of this brilliant analytical cricket mind. The book doesn’t just run through the history of test cricket, it glides through it. It points out how the game has moved from its birthplace to where it is now. Kimber doesn’t mince words when he is pointing out the dark spots/underbelly of cricket and thats why this makes for a I have been a fan of Jarrod Kimber for quiet some time now. His blogs, podcasts and videos full of analytics are brilliant to say the least. This book is just one more product of this brilliant analytical cricket mind. The book doesn’t just run through the history of test cricket, it glides through it. It points out how the game has moved from its birthplace to where it is now. Kimber doesn’t mince words when he is pointing out the dark spots/underbelly of cricket and thats why this makes for a very interesting and informative read. Worth a read for every cricket fan..!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Roshan

    If ever there's a book written on Test Cricket which can give Jarrod Kimber's Test Cricket: The Unauthorised Biography, a run for its money it would be Test Cricket: The Unauthorised Biography itself. The brilliant work on cricket's oldest format is a mind fulfilling read. It brings to fore the period when Test cricket attracted the attention and interest of the masses, and soon evolved into a crowd-pulling affair with big names gracing the game over a short time, a century and a half earlier. T If ever there's a book written on Test Cricket which can give Jarrod Kimber's Test Cricket: The Unauthorised Biography, a run for its money it would be Test Cricket: The Unauthorised Biography itself. The brilliant work on cricket's oldest format is a mind fulfilling read. It brings to fore the period when Test cricket attracted the attention and interest of the masses, and soon evolved into a crowd-pulling affair with big names gracing the game over a short time, a century and a half earlier. The author Jarrod Kimber is instrumental in his approach and effort of gathering significant facts about events on and off the cricket field which have influenced the game stupendously resulting in frequent evolution in the way the game is played, and has gained acceptance with masses over the years in different parts of the world. Cricket matches and related events collated into a collection and presented herein as a memoir to cricket admirers by Jarrod Kimber, offers sixty three absorbing stories from the past and recent past that took the world of cricket, its followers, and the cricket experts by storm and surprise. The chronicle has more cricket facts in it than a curious reader would anticipate at first glimpse of the non-fiction work on the sport. The glorious journey of Test cricket evaluating the perennial impact the classic format has had on the mindset of cricketers from different eras, matches played under varying weather and climatic conditions, the unpredictable but sometime vicious and deceptive nature of cricket field and batting surface (the cricket pitch), the revolutionizing of sporting protective cricket gears and guards, the highly embraced yet constantly varying and evolving umpiring standards among other factors that have vastly influenced and suited similar cricketing contexts during Test matches are allotted dedicated writing space extensively by the author. Also evident from the read is the exhaustively researched history and origin of cricket artistry such as wrong'un, reverse swing, carom ball, various variations in off-break and leg-break bowling, the side and round arm bowling action and the acceptable degree of exception leveraged on its execution on the field, the reverse sweep - Gooch's innovation which devastated the Indian spin juggernaut, besides other interesting revelations on the original inventors of these revolutionizing cricketing skills. From the time WG Grace graced the game of cricket to the time it embraced the limited overs and One day international cricket format, the time Sir Donald Bradman took guard at the crease for the first time to the time India discovered the prodigy in Sachin Tendulkar, the time Sir Vivian Richards intimidated the world's best bowlers with his unique swagger to the time the Australians very nearly perfected and emulated invincibility, the time the W's hogged limelight and tasted success to the time game of cricket exercised a u-turn with advent of Packer's impactful dilemma and reinstatement of South African cricket team with privilege of playing international cricket, the time Sri Lanka and New Zealand marked their arrival on international cricket arena with thumping wins after a long wait to the time of associate nations' induction into the International Cricket Council, in addition to various similar timeless associations and events that the game of cricket has experienced and embraced since its invention are penned in an exquisite manner and enthrall the Test cricket enthusiasts keeping them glued to the chronicled creation until eternity. Such is the impact the book has in store for cricket lovers. Further us, the young Indian nationals who've known and worshipped only one God since 1989, the book springs up a surprise by introducing a bearded monster WG Grace christened as the first and original God of cricket by Englishmen, and graced the game of cricket to confront the Australian demon of his times - Fred Spofforth. Another interesting anecdote made available to the cricket fans is the fact that the game of cricket developed an unlikely liking toward citizens of United States and Canada during the later part of the 19th century, and the folks living in these countries responded by readily embracing England's own innovated version of baseball. Cricket's rise to popularity and success in these parts of the world were short-lived with the Americans and Canadians deciding to stick with baseball and soccer to gain sporting exuberance. After Grace's demolition of the demon in Fred Spofforth, Australia discovered their own God of cricket in Victor Trumper, a stylish cricketer who had the Aussies cricket fraternity on their toes during the Golden Age of cricket. The terrific exploits of cricketers on the field, the game of cricket witnessed after the Grace-Trumper era surpassed the benchmark for power-packed performance set by the two esteemed colossal figures and raised the bar for the subsequent generation of elite cricketers who followed. Sir Donald Bradman was the chief architect of cricket's rise to popularity in England and Australia during early part of the 20th century. Along with his contemporaries - the likes of Wally Hammond, Sir Jack Hobbs, Bill Ponsford, Douglas Jardine, and Harold Larwood; Bradman dominated some of the finest Test matches played between the two teams - Australia and England. Arguably, the greatest batsman of all time, Bradman ended his Test career with a batting average characteristic of a human being possessing God's power. Ironically, Bradman was never conferred the title of God of Cricket by his peers, his contemporaries, or the cricketing contingent world over. He was The Don. The Don who owned the nod to play every Test match against his famous rival team - England. England, during the decade of 1930-1940 were at the receiving end of The Don's ire. The run machine picked England's bowlers, be it fast, medium-paced, or the spinners for punitive treatment accumulating tons of runs at an extraordinary pace and recording excellent awe-inspiring batting averages and feats consistently against them, which the cricket historians believed only The Don could have accomplished, the way it was accomplished. Cricket's history has had its fair share of controversies - from Bodyline to sledging to racial discrimination to ball tampering to rebellious intent from players which disturbed the integrity of the game to match fixing. The game has survived these ordeals with a lively sporting spirit and emerged victorious most times. The Kerry Packer dilemma that dogged many cricketers during the decade of 1970-1980 succeeded in bringing to fore the long forgotten ghost of prospects of marketing cricket in the United States for the second time in approximately one hundred and fifty years since cricket made its debut. Jarrod Kimber is colloquial with his insights on the controversial events that have marred cricket's progress time and again. This fairly justifies his involvement and obsession with Test Cricket and its whereabouts which the readers get to identify at the first go before flipping the last leaf of the biography. Readers in quest for a considerable dose of witty remarks and humorous exchange between cricketers on and off the field are never left stranded in their search for one, for there are many hilarious snippets on offer which leave us, the cricket enthusiasts yearning for more. Now, this unique trait of identifying the tricky and bizarre witty moments on and off the cricket field seem to be the author's major life support system vis-à-vis his wording of humour elements. There's aplenty of it in the book. The bossy Bosie's success tale, the sight of batsmen getting foxed by The Tiger and the Fox, the gist on sober Sobers's sombre efforts against Pakistan, an account on New Zealand cricket's revival taking shape in the form of Glenn Turner's cohesive unit, the saga of Indian big cat Tiger Pataudi's endless roar never unheard before, the romance in Indian cricket team bagging the recognition plate with an emphatic World Cup triumph form an enticing read and provide the much needed impetus to the slow paced cricket narrative. Kimber's piece of writing has the making of a complete biography of Test Cricket with a mention of every minute detail regarding Test Cricket and the fascination toward it among cricket experts. The absorbing read has in the offing for readers Test cricket's own narratives which shaped its existence and progress over centuries to this day in the 21st century. International Cricket Council's stranglehold over cricket's marketing never flourished on a large scale until India announced its arrival by successfully bagging exclusive broadcasting rights of cricket matches played abroad, mostly outside the sub-continent for the first time. In the Indian sub-continent, the brand named Sachin Tendulkar did no harm to cricket's rising popularity either. The cricket icon's exploits with the bat does not go unnoticed in Test cricket's biography and Kimber reintroduces readers to Tendulkar's most accomplished, cherished, and endeared cricketing victory and prized possession of his career - the World Cup triumph in 2011. The section narrating the entire episode is hilarious and acts as a reagent to an interesting cricket tale the author discloses, which consume writing space prior to the segment rolling out a description on MS Dhoni's famous six in the final of the ICC event - the author's much awaited opportunity to watch Tendulkar bat from close quarters at the Melbourne Cricket Ground during the touring Indian team's match against Victoria in 2003. Kimber's work also takes a deep dive into the large ocean called Twenty20 - the shortest format of the game in international cricket in the concluding segment of the book. New Zealand's legend Richard Hadlee never had Lee during his career. What he did have was a moustache the Tigers and the Foxes envied. Reading the segment titled The moustachioed villain takes us on a journey which explores Test Cricket's grueling element of tough grind and the manner in which it brings out the best from the better on the cricket field for five energy soaking days, an enigma likely to produce a contest of high intensity when it lasts the distance. The revival of New Zealand cricket occurred in three different eras and in three different ways. If Glenn Turner and his boys turned around the fortune of New Zealand's Test cricket leading the nation to its first Test series win, Martin Crowe crowed with delight after spearheading Kiwis One Day international team's revival. However, New Zealand cricket's first rock-star was Richard Hadlee, a fierce competitor with formidable all-round skills who gave the opponents many sleepless nights. Sir Richard Hadlee put New Zealand cricket on global map by featuring among leading wicket-takers in Tests. He ended his Test career holding the record for highest Test wickets. New Zealand cricket past Richard Hadlee, witnessed a long period of drought and slump, and then, in came the flow of abundant talent with Daniel Vettori, Shane Bond, and Brendon McCullum making considerable impact on the fortune and prospect of the Kiwi progress in international cricket. Throughout the reading experience, one can sense Jarrod Kimber setting the tone for subsequent segments with inclusion of cheeky titles. Book readers can derive the drive and motivation to finish the read from a vast range of telling occurrences on and off the cricket field elaborated very clearly and distinctly by the author. Jarrod Kimber's Test Cricket: The Unauthorised Biography cracks the Test with a 5/5 from my PAT (Point Allocation Table). Test Cricket is likely to retain its cut above other formats in the game's immediate future. The biography of Test Cricket explores every previously undiscovered fact about the interesting cricket characters the game has embraced and let go in short intervals of cricket history, to reflect on the epiphanies associated with the characters' characteristic style of play and their impact on the game. The author's unauthorised biography is a leading example of the Test exploits of great players enclosed in a small package counting unto scarcely below the better part of three hundred pages. Test Cricket enthusiasts are advised not to consider giving the read a complete miss. Test Cricket appreciators are well off giving in to the read more than once. Test Cricket players can hit it off instantly with this read. Test Cricket fanatics can bow out gracefully from the group which considers itself as Test Cricket enthusiasts for, their enthusiasm can burn a hole in the fanatics expertise on the matter awaiting their attention in the exclusive cricket chronicle. A brilliantly scripted book on Test Cricket that includes every element of human emotion and behaviour associated with sport lovers such as competitive flair, excitement, exultation, heroics, exaggeration, tragedy, historical disruption, aggression, mind games, strategy devising, decision making, trick execution, innovation, and the eventual acceptance of victory, defeat, draw, or tie. Test Cricket lovers are assured of a feast of feats only a good student of the game would relish and be able to grasp at will. An excellent read. 'Test cricket is the true test of character and grit for the players the game has embraced willingly. Test Cricket is the surreal inclusion of character and wit the game has witnessed inevitably.'

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nitin

    I've always liked Kimber's writings and this book is no exception. Kimber captures the joy, the beauty, the heartbreak of test cricket (with some ODIs and T20s thrown in the latter sections) but he also doesn't shy from speaking of the history of injustice - whether it be racism, sexism, classism, or the forever present injustice of the batting establishment against the bowling underclass. And yet through all of this, his love for the game shines through. The book is full of characters - maveric I've always liked Kimber's writings and this book is no exception. Kimber captures the joy, the beauty, the heartbreak of test cricket (with some ODIs and T20s thrown in the latter sections) but he also doesn't shy from speaking of the history of injustice - whether it be racism, sexism, classism, or the forever present injustice of the batting establishment against the bowling underclass. And yet through all of this, his love for the game shines through. The book is full of characters - mavericks, statesmen, cheaters, bastards but cricketers above all. He paints the beauty of Victor Trumper, the long forgotten genius of Sydney Barnes, the grace of Ranji's wrists and the courage of Tiger Pataudi. Being an Indian, my favourite chapters were when he talked about Kapil Dev and Sachin Tendulkar. He almost makes you remember what it was like growing up in 90s and seeing the Indian cricket grow alongside. Their are a lot of memorable quotes about the grace and grit of the cricketers - some moving, some outrageously funny. I think my favourite might be when he describes Graeme Smith's batting as "He certainly spent years trying to prove that left-handed batsmen aren't actually more aesthetically appealing than right-handed batsmen." But with all this fun, there are things which haven't necessarily aged well in last 5 years. All the talk of healing South Africa's wounds is now in the question with renewed allegations of discrimination. But at the same time, there are things which only have got better since 2015. Kimber went to bat for Afghanistan and Ireland in his book. And lo, they are both test playing nations now - something which a romantic like him must surely love.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Prabhat sharma

    Test Cricket: The Unauthorised Biography: Jarrod Kimber. The Book is well researched document in the form of interesting stories about- cricket test matches and limited over matches, Kerry Packer series – old and new players, teams, administrators, cricket lovers, and spectators in the cricket playing countries. Cricket has developed in the 18th century at England followed by Australia, West Indies, New Zealand. Later, description about South Africa, India, Pakistan and further Srilanka, Banglad Test Cricket: The Unauthorised Biography: Jarrod Kimber. The Book is well researched document in the form of interesting stories about- cricket test matches and limited over matches, Kerry Packer series – old and new players, teams, administrators, cricket lovers, and spectators in the cricket playing countries. Cricket has developed in the 18th century at England followed by Australia, West Indies, New Zealand. Later, description about South Africa, India, Pakistan and further Srilanka, Bangladesh, Ireland, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Argentina has been narrated. Women cricket stories – how they struggled for recognition -are also part of the interesting book. The book puts special emphasis on how to bring viewers to stadium to view the match and gate collection is raised because of entertainment. The stories have shown the charm of cricket – that today an ordinary boy or girl after proving his talent becomes a star overnight. Australia has training and developed systemic training of cricketers from school level. The administrators provide for stipend and less worry about 10 to 5 job for budding players. In India also, National Cricket Academy has been formed for training and health of players. After one day cricket, International Cricket Conference is fairly rich and can spend more for the development of cricket in Ireland, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Argentina and other such countries. More such books should be written because they throw light on importance of sports in human life – that during viewing the match, the viewers forget their worries and enjoy the match.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vinayak Hegde

    I love Test Cricket - all of it - the history, the battles within the battles, the rivalries and last but not the least the skill and resilience needed to win a test. I have been following Jarrod Kimber's writings on Cricinfo for more than a decade and love how he brings the sport to life. Jarrod Kimber is a magician with words. He writes with beautiful metaphors without being cliche. He is passionate about cricket - especially Test cricket and it shows. The books follows the evolution of cricket I love Test Cricket - all of it - the history, the battles within the battles, the rivalries and last but not the least the skill and resilience needed to win a test. I have been following Jarrod Kimber's writings on Cricinfo for more than a decade and love how he brings the sport to life. Jarrod Kimber is a magician with words. He writes with beautiful metaphors without being cliche. He is passionate about cricket - especially Test cricket and it shows. The books follows the evolution of cricket from it's humble origins to a gentleman's game through the wars and the various controversies. Also you realize that the game has changed a lot over the years - what was once deemed controversial in the game is now considered par for the course. It also chronicles the lives and careers of the greats that shaped the game - WG Grace, Victor Trumper, Ranjitsinghji aand a litany of others. Kimbers tracks crickets evolution through the infamous bodyline series, the Kerry Packer years, the famous "groveling" series between England and WI. The the book slowly descends into descends into mediocrity just as Kimber starts covering every other test series, one-days and horror of horrors - the anti-test T20. Needless to say I motored through the last 3rd of the book. The book could have done with a much better curator and editor. Began with a bang, became better and then ended with a whimper.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anal Ghosh

    Jarrod Kimber is the quintessential cricket romantic. Having been a fan of his Cricinfo articles for a long time, I was sure I didn't want to miss this book. And boy, he didn't disappoint! Laced with his trademark cynical humor, punchy dialogues, and a treasure trove of trivia, he does a wonderful job chronicling the history of test cricket (with some lip service to other forms). The origins of the game from the 19th century to the 1980s are deeply researched and presented, while for the recent Jarrod Kimber is the quintessential cricket romantic. Having been a fan of his Cricinfo articles for a long time, I was sure I didn't want to miss this book. And boy, he didn't disappoint! Laced with his trademark cynical humor, punchy dialogues, and a treasure trove of trivia, he does a wonderful job chronicling the history of test cricket (with some lip service to other forms). The origins of the game from the 19th century to the 1980s are deeply researched and presented, while for the recent years, he mostly covers interesting incidents and anecdotes. There are riveting accounts of erstwhile legends, about whom you have heard of but known much (Fred Spofforth, Sydney Barnes, Learie Constantine, Victor Trumper, etc.), and momentous matches (first-ever for all countries, the first tied test, bodyline series, blackwash, etc.). The book is organized in multiple short chapters, and you can easily pick up chapters randomly and read in short bursts, despite the linear narrative. This might not be a comprehensive history of the sport, but one of the finest books written on the sport.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ietrio

    Apparently Mr. Test was very upset about Kimber and has sent his lawyers to block the publication of this beautiful book. Lucky for Kimber, the editors have not backed up and here's the valuable information. A book about a guy named Australia who can't bat and another one named New Zeeland who can bat, but can't do other things. I have no idea how the game went forward, probably it was a game like Cricket, only played like Singles in Tennis. Apparently Mr. Test was very upset about Kimber and has sent his lawyers to block the publication of this beautiful book. Lucky for Kimber, the editors have not backed up and here's the valuable information. A book about a guy named Australia who can't bat and another one named New Zeeland who can bat, but can't do other things. I have no idea how the game went forward, probably it was a game like Cricket, only played like Singles in Tennis.

  9. 4 out of 5

    BMK

    I like Jarrod Kimber, I like cricket and I liked this book. I found the stuff about the early years of cricket more interesting than the more recent stuff which I had both seen and read about when it was actually happening.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lautaro

    Quite entertaining and very well written. Recommended for hardcore cricket fans only. Quite a few things have happened in Test cricket since it was published.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Piyush Pal

    It starts off pretty well. It serves it's purpose - of taking you through the history of test cricket. But the descriptions sound a bit repetitive after a while. It starts off pretty well. It serves it's purpose - of taking you through the history of test cricket. But the descriptions sound a bit repetitive after a while.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rahul

    Hisotry with Entertainment

  13. 5 out of 5

    Moosa Sharif

    A good book for those interested in the details of how the game came into being and how it evolved over the years and who were the light bearers to carry the vame through generations.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Abinash

    I love Jarrod. This was a wonderful read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rohit Nair

    More of a stream of consciousness book - a good collection of blog posts. But all in Jarrod’s own style, so if you like his writing, you should like the book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Manish

    Jarrod Kimber is not an artist with words. He would never claim that. The world might never disagree. He is just a man passionate about cricket. This book is a work of passion above anything else. I recently saw the documentary,” Death of a Gentleman” that he co-produced with Sam Collins. That is a work of passion as well. In that documentary, he investigates, condemns and then resigns himself to the deplorable state of Test Cricket. He started work on this book when he was still making that doc Jarrod Kimber is not an artist with words. He would never claim that. The world might never disagree. He is just a man passionate about cricket. This book is a work of passion above anything else. I recently saw the documentary,” Death of a Gentleman” that he co-produced with Sam Collins. That is a work of passion as well. In that documentary, he investigates, condemns and then resigns himself to the deplorable state of Test Cricket. He started work on this book when he was still making that documentary. All the research he must have done for that documentary finds its way into this book. By illustrating the numerous issues that cricket faced and subsequently triumphed, he reassures that Cricket will triumph; it always does. The words have come straight from the heart.This is the work of a hopeful romantic. That this is also a work of art is purely coincidental. Jarrod Kimber might never agree. The world might disagree yet.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kiwi

    I've long been a fan of test cricket, and have enjoyed Cricinfo contributor Jarrod Kimber's thoughts on the game. In this very readable book, Jarrod seems to have taken the best of his research from the documentary film Death of a Gentleman (produced by Kimber & Sam Collins) and presented it in a way that interests a cricket tragic like me, but will also appeal to a wider audience. I read Test Cricket on a four hour flight. At times I chuckled, at other times I got a lump in my throat, particular I've long been a fan of test cricket, and have enjoyed Cricinfo contributor Jarrod Kimber's thoughts on the game. In this very readable book, Jarrod seems to have taken the best of his research from the documentary film Death of a Gentleman (produced by Kimber & Sam Collins) and presented it in a way that interests a cricket tragic like me, but will also appeal to a wider audience. I read Test Cricket on a four hour flight. At times I chuckled, at other times I got a lump in my throat, particularly in the retelling of the 1953 Boxing Day test between New Zealand and hosts South Africa, in the aftermath of the Tangiwai disaster, and of course, in the passages related to the untimely death of Australian cricketer Phillip Hughes. Jarrod is known to many cricket fans for his acerbic wit and typically Australian humour, but in this book he makes his mark as a serious cricket writer. I'm grateful for this, as I could actually give this book to my Dad. A must read for fans of the game.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sabahat

    From the first page till the last, this beautifully written book held my mind and my heart. I picked it up because of Jarrod Kimber knowing this person can never fail to amaze me with his words and rightly so. This book is just what cricket is: a pure roller-coaster of emotions. And after going through all kinds of emotions, I ended up falling in love with it. There isn't a single line let alone a page that you'd find boring or would want to skip. In fact, you'd want to read a few chapters (if n From the first page till the last, this beautifully written book held my mind and my heart. I picked it up because of Jarrod Kimber knowing this person can never fail to amaze me with his words and rightly so. This book is just what cricket is: a pure roller-coaster of emotions. And after going through all kinds of emotions, I ended up falling in love with it. There isn't a single line let alone a page that you'd find boring or would want to skip. In fact, you'd want to read a few chapters (if not all) over and over again. The book is full of interesting, heart-breaking, worth remembering facts and figures. Full of everything a cricket fan's brain should be full of. It was one of those books that I wanted to finish and also didn't want it to ever end. It is one of those books that I'll be re-reading many times.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brian Boyle

    Comprehensive history of Test cricket, told in a series of short vignettes. Good coverage of women's cricket, minor nations and doesn't shirk away from cricket's darker side of racism, sexism and corruption. Unfortunately the writing style is a more than a little clunky - making it difficult to follow in places. It almost as if blog text had been thrown together in a rich to get it out in time for the Australian summer reading market, starved of any decent cricket this summer. Comprehensive history of Test cricket, told in a series of short vignettes. Good coverage of women's cricket, minor nations and doesn't shirk away from cricket's darker side of racism, sexism and corruption. Unfortunately the writing style is a more than a little clunky - making it difficult to follow in places. It almost as if blog text had been thrown together in a rich to get it out in time for the Australian summer reading market, starved of any decent cricket this summer.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Akshy

    Jarrod Kimber worships cricket. He loves Test Cricket. More than anything else in the world I presume. He brings players to life using words. From WG Grace to Shapoor Zadran. Sometimes he spits with intensity like Spofforth. His writing is sometimes as poetic as VVS Laxman. Had Eddie Gilbert been as vociferous as Kimber against the ruling bosses, he would have been a champion. The reader enjoys every inch of the book. He too worships cricket. He respects Kimber.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Paulisbored

    Less a traditional history book and more of a series of essays detailing key moments in the game's history. The early stuff is interesting but Kimber is at his absolute best when he's writing about the cricket itself. The chapter on Sri Lanka's 2014 tour of England, for instance, is simply extraordinary. Less a traditional history book and more of a series of essays detailing key moments in the game's history. The early stuff is interesting but Kimber is at his absolute best when he's writing about the cricket itself. The chapter on Sri Lanka's 2014 tour of England, for instance, is simply extraordinary.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hamish

    The parts about Hughes were nice, and I could probably read a whole book about that, but the rest just seemed sort of pointless. A series of loosely connected vignettes that I wasn't sure I actually wanted to read. Like a collection of his articles, not something meant to be seen as one overreaching book. And FULL OF TYPOS! AND THE SHORT SENTENCES GOT ANNOYING. MAYBE I ACTUALLY HATED IT The parts about Hughes were nice, and I could probably read a whole book about that, but the rest just seemed sort of pointless. A series of loosely connected vignettes that I wasn't sure I actually wanted to read. Like a collection of his articles, not something meant to be seen as one overreaching book. And FULL OF TYPOS! AND THE SHORT SENTENCES GOT ANNOYING. MAYBE I ACTUALLY HATED IT

  23. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Since I ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️ test match cricket I was always going to love this book. It gets increasingly easy to predict what is coming as we move into modern times but all the right bases are covered. A swift, entertaining and informative reminder of the wonders of test cricket for fans of the game.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ridwan Anam

    A magnificent read on history of cricket. Apart from downplaying Bangladesh, this book is perfect for beginners to learn about the most dazzling moments of cricket. Thoroughly recommended for cricket enthusiasts.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ruchik

    Jarrod Kimber is a terrific cricket writer, this is more of an essay collection about the evolution of cricket, Some essays are brilliant ,some not so. But worth a read for the cricket fan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Suman Srivastava

    Brilliant. This is cricket with all the emotions. Cricket with all the back stories. Cricket with lots of passion. All cricket lovers will enjoy this.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Pranav Tanwar

  28. 5 out of 5

    MadFreya

  29. 4 out of 5

    Danny

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tony

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