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Making Faces: Drawing Expressions for Comics and Cartoons

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Chances are, you already know how to draw some expressions. But face it, your stories can only get so far with "happy," "sad" and "angry." In order to give your characters some character, you need to know what they look like when they're about to sneeze, when they smell something stinky or when they're flirting, horrified or completely blotto. Lucky for you, that's what th Chances are, you already know how to draw some expressions. But face it, your stories can only get so far with "happy," "sad" and "angry." In order to give your characters some character, you need to know what they look like when they're about to sneeze, when they smell something stinky or when they're flirting, horrified or completely blotto. Lucky for you, that's what this book is all about! Making Faces contains everything you need to give your characters a wide range of expressions! Part 1: The Basics. How to draw heads, mouths, noses and eyes, and how they change shape when they move. Part 2: The Faces. Over 50 step-by-step demonstrations for a variety of expressions divided into scenarios. Each scenario shows four or five expressions from a single character, from simple emotions to more subtle and complex variations, so you see how a face changes with each emotion. Sidebars illustrate the same expressions on a variety of other characters. Part 3: Storytelling.How to move your story along using expression, point of view, body language and composition. See how it all comes together with damsels in distress, a noir-style interrogation, a Western standoff and other situations. Illustrated with a diverse cast of characters from hobos to superheroes to teenage girls, this guide will help you create the looks that say it all.


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Chances are, you already know how to draw some expressions. But face it, your stories can only get so far with "happy," "sad" and "angry." In order to give your characters some character, you need to know what they look like when they're about to sneeze, when they smell something stinky or when they're flirting, horrified or completely blotto. Lucky for you, that's what th Chances are, you already know how to draw some expressions. But face it, your stories can only get so far with "happy," "sad" and "angry." In order to give your characters some character, you need to know what they look like when they're about to sneeze, when they smell something stinky or when they're flirting, horrified or completely blotto. Lucky for you, that's what this book is all about! Making Faces contains everything you need to give your characters a wide range of expressions! Part 1: The Basics. How to draw heads, mouths, noses and eyes, and how they change shape when they move. Part 2: The Faces. Over 50 step-by-step demonstrations for a variety of expressions divided into scenarios. Each scenario shows four or five expressions from a single character, from simple emotions to more subtle and complex variations, so you see how a face changes with each emotion. Sidebars illustrate the same expressions on a variety of other characters. Part 3: Storytelling.How to move your story along using expression, point of view, body language and composition. See how it all comes together with damsels in distress, a noir-style interrogation, a Western standoff and other situations. Illustrated with a diverse cast of characters from hobos to superheroes to teenage girls, this guide will help you create the looks that say it all.

54 review for Making Faces: Drawing Expressions for Comics and Cartoons

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ietrio

    Far from being written by a talented person, it can be quite useful for the first steps of the child. And the book is far less formulaic than others in the same range.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    A bit self-important and unnecessarily smart at times, but it was fun to see different styles. Probably useful for a beginner hobby artist.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    The guys who wrote this book are talented. But a lot of the expressions are incorrect. They combine positions of mouth and eyes that the human face can't actually make. And while many of the expressions are clever, and confidently and boldly drawn, they quite often don't express the particular emotions they claim to illustrate. I don't honestly think it's a book to learn much from. Also every image of a female in the book is oppressive. And it's egregiously white. The guys who wrote this book are talented. But a lot of the expressions are incorrect. They combine positions of mouth and eyes that the human face can't actually make. And while many of the expressions are clever, and confidently and boldly drawn, they quite often don't express the particular emotions they claim to illustrate. I don't honestly think it's a book to learn much from. Also every image of a female in the book is oppressive. And it's egregiously white.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jaime Guzman

    A good start on facial expressions The book goes over the fundamentals of drawing faces and later gets into facial expressions. Each artist brings their own individual art style and their drawing process of developing facial expressions. A good book to have in a cartoonist's library. Avoid the Kindle version of this book which has grainy images and the intro page that introduces the artists is unreadable. A good start on facial expressions The book goes over the fundamentals of drawing faces and later gets into facial expressions. Each artist brings their own individual art style and their drawing process of developing facial expressions. A good book to have in a cartoonist's library. Avoid the Kindle version of this book which has grainy images and the intro page that introduces the artists is unreadable.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Peter Hale

    Very good for unprofessional animators and comic book artists like me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    favio

    Pretty good The book was good but more for beginners. The illustrations were stylish and instructive. Not to mention funny. The level of expression of the drawings are awesome definitely good starter work.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Steve Garvin

    I enjoyed the diversity of style in the book and the input of different artists. The variety of characters was helpful in exploring different approaches.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  9. 4 out of 5

    Yadi

  10. 4 out of 5

    Beepb00p

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  12. 4 out of 5

    Adam Greenow

  13. 5 out of 5

    Danny

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jayson

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  18. 5 out of 5

    Perihan

  19. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erick

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sylvain G.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Josehurra

  23. 4 out of 5

    Yordani Pulido

  24. 5 out of 5

    Willow

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bob

  26. 5 out of 5

    B-Rell

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marvin Perez

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey B Palmberg

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gustavo Vitarelli de Queiroz

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pixiepal

  31. 5 out of 5

    Carly

  32. 5 out of 5

    Roland

  33. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  34. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  35. 5 out of 5

    Carina

  36. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

  37. 4 out of 5

    Simon

  38. 5 out of 5

    Billie

  39. 4 out of 5

    Doug

  40. 5 out of 5

    PCDL-Teens

  41. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

  42. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  43. 5 out of 5

    Zee

  44. 4 out of 5

    Daryl Chritsensen

  45. 4 out of 5

    Philip Edward

  46. 4 out of 5

    Yan Li

  47. 4 out of 5

    Michael Wyatt

  48. 4 out of 5

    Wesen

  49. 4 out of 5

    Megs T Fretty

  50. 5 out of 5

    Christian

  51. 4 out of 5

    Penpen

  52. 4 out of 5

    Sumair Jain

  53. 4 out of 5

    Hussain Alismail

  54. 4 out of 5

    Toryn Green

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