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The Inheritance

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A mysterious bequest of money leads to a murder in this new novel in the critically acclaimed and bestselling series whose last installment The New York Times called “a sterling addition to this well-polished series.” Charles Lenox has received a cryptic plea for help from an old Harrow schoolmate, Gerald Leigh, but when he looks into the matter he finds that his friend has A mysterious bequest of money leads to a murder in this new novel in the critically acclaimed and bestselling series whose last installment The New York Times called “a sterling addition to this well-polished series.” Charles Lenox has received a cryptic plea for help from an old Harrow schoolmate, Gerald Leigh, but when he looks into the matter he finds that his friend has suddenly disappeared. As boys they had shared a secret: a bequest from a mysterious benefactor had smoothed Leigh’s way into the world after the death of his father. Lenox, already with a passionate interest in detective work, made discovering the benefactor's identity his first case – but was never able to solve it. Now, years later, Leigh has been the recipient of a second, even more generous bequest. Is it from the same anonymous sponsor? Or is the money poisoned by ulterior motives? Leigh’s disappearance suggests the latter, and as Lenox tries, desperately, to save his friend’s life, he’s forced into confrontations with both the most dangerous of east end gangs and the far more genteel denizens of the illustrious Royal Society. When someone close to the bequest dies, Lenox must finally delve deep into the past to uncover at last the identity of the person who is either his friend’s savior – or his lethal enemy.


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A mysterious bequest of money leads to a murder in this new novel in the critically acclaimed and bestselling series whose last installment The New York Times called “a sterling addition to this well-polished series.” Charles Lenox has received a cryptic plea for help from an old Harrow schoolmate, Gerald Leigh, but when he looks into the matter he finds that his friend has A mysterious bequest of money leads to a murder in this new novel in the critically acclaimed and bestselling series whose last installment The New York Times called “a sterling addition to this well-polished series.” Charles Lenox has received a cryptic plea for help from an old Harrow schoolmate, Gerald Leigh, but when he looks into the matter he finds that his friend has suddenly disappeared. As boys they had shared a secret: a bequest from a mysterious benefactor had smoothed Leigh’s way into the world after the death of his father. Lenox, already with a passionate interest in detective work, made discovering the benefactor's identity his first case – but was never able to solve it. Now, years later, Leigh has been the recipient of a second, even more generous bequest. Is it from the same anonymous sponsor? Or is the money poisoned by ulterior motives? Leigh’s disappearance suggests the latter, and as Lenox tries, desperately, to save his friend’s life, he’s forced into confrontations with both the most dangerous of east end gangs and the far more genteel denizens of the illustrious Royal Society. When someone close to the bequest dies, Lenox must finally delve deep into the past to uncover at last the identity of the person who is either his friend’s savior – or his lethal enemy.

30 review for The Inheritance

  1. 4 out of 5

    Charles Finch

    I wrote this book! Six stars, possibly six and a half!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    3.5 A historical mystery set in the Victorian age that I have followed from the beginning. Has just the right mixture of history, historical trivia, intrigue, family scenes and great character development. Lennox, a very interesting character, with a fascinating back story, once held a seat in Parliament, but his real love is detecting and he now runs his own detective agency. This case will take a few turns but will lead back to one path. Microbes, the Royal society, botany and one character wi 3.5 A historical mystery set in the Victorian age that I have followed from the beginning. Has just the right mixture of history, historical trivia, intrigue, family scenes and great character development. Lennox, a very interesting character, with a fascinating back story, once held a seat in Parliament, but his real love is detecting and he now runs his own detective agency. This case will take a few turns but will lead back to one path. Microbes, the Royal society, botany and one character will find himself in a life struggle. I learned why the English drive on the right and the American on the left, also the origin of the word quiz. Slower paced as most historical are, atmospheric and descriptive, this series is good stuff. ARC from Netgalley.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Malia

    I'm sure I've mentioned this before in a review of another book in this series, but what I love most about Lenox is that he seems so real. We may be separated by time space and realms of fiction vs. reality, and still I am surprised sometimes reading the books that I can never meet Charles Lenox. In my experience, books with characters like these are the ones that stick with me the longest. Details of the mystery may blur, but I remember what the characters did, how they felt and how I watched t I'm sure I've mentioned this before in a review of another book in this series, but what I love most about Lenox is that he seems so real. We may be separated by time space and realms of fiction vs. reality, and still I am surprised sometimes reading the books that I can never meet Charles Lenox. In my experience, books with characters like these are the ones that stick with me the longest. Details of the mystery may blur, but I remember what the characters did, how they felt and how I watched the progression of their lives through hundreds and hundreds of pages. "The Inheritance" case brings an old friend back into Lenox's life, and old friend, but a new case. As the title would suggest, the story centers around a mysterious inheritance, but also a mystery of their shared school days at Harrow, dubious East End gangs and the Royal Society. This book, like all the others in this series, is packed with historical detail (I always feel I learn a lot about Victorian life through Lenox), beautiful language and characters I have grown very fond of, as mentioned above. I was happy for Dallington to have a substantial role and for McConnell to be doing much better than he had in some of the previous books. I also very much appreciate that time, in this series, actually moved forward and the protagonist grows older and develops with the changes life throws at him. As for the mystery itself, there were plenty of red herrings to make me guess who the culprit might be, but the resolution did end up being a surprise, which I always value in a mystery. The only criticism I have is that I will have to wait another year to find out what is happening next with my old pal Lenox and his memorable coterie! Find more reviews and bookish fun at http://www.princessandpen.com

  4. 4 out of 5

    LJ

    First Sentence: London was silent with snow, soft flakes of it dropping evenly into the white streets, nobody outside who had somewhere inside to be. Private Enquiry Agent receives a rather cryptic request for help from an old boarding school friend whom he has not seen for many years. It was a private bequest which allowed Gerald Leigh to attend Harrow, and now he has been notified of a second, even more generous entitlement. Leigh has been attacked once and now when they go to question the att First Sentence: London was silent with snow, soft flakes of it dropping evenly into the white streets, nobody outside who had somewhere inside to be. Private Enquiry Agent receives a rather cryptic request for help from an old boarding school friend whom he has not seen for many years. It was a private bequest which allowed Gerald Leigh to attend Harrow, and now he has been notified of a second, even more generous entitlement. Leigh has been attacked once and now when they go to question the attorney, they find him murdered. Between East End gangs, and members of the Royal Society, Lenox has his hands full keeping his friend alive while solving a mystery. Finch is a wonderfully evocative writer. From the opening paragraph, you are in the room with Lenox and a scene eminently relatable to anyone who has lived in a snowy climate. He then sets the stage for suspense and introduced us to the characters, all in a very concise, economical fashion. Finch is very good at providing background information on the characters as they enter the story. If one is a fan of British detective shows, one might smile at the character of “Inspector Frost.” One of the pleasures of reading historical, is the small bits of information one learns—the genesis of “cabs,” why the English drive on the left while American drive on the right, and the changes brought about in the Victorian age, including fish and chips. It is also, sadly, interesting to note the disparity between the salaries of man and women, and the conflict between science and politics. To further establish the sense of time, we have mouth-watering descriptions of food—“Baked mullets came out to the table; rissoles, and roast fowl, and macaroni with parmesan cheese, and sea-kale; for dessert there was a laudably enormous charlotte russe placed at the center of each table, with vanilla hard sauce trickling down its sides.” Dialogue is a strength of Finch’s, particularly that between Lenox and his brother Edmund—“What shall we do now?” Edmund had asked. “We could have a look around Truro.” “Yes, that should be a thrilling eight minutes.” “The Inheritance” is wonderfully done with excellent arcs to the story, with rises and falls in the suspense, and a delightful ending. THE INHERITANCE (Hist Mys-Charles Lennox-England-1877) – Ex Finch, Charles – 10th in series Minotaur Books, Nov 2016

  5. 5 out of 5

    The Lit Bitch

    One of my favorite ‘armchair detectives’ is back…..though he’s less of an amateur and more of a professional than he was in the first books! The Charles Lenox series has been a fall fixture for me for quite some time. Some of the mysteries I liked better than others but this one was especially delightful. I loved being back in London, the last mystery was set in the country but there is something about London that works so much better for me in this series. It’s been so fun watching Lenox evolve t One of my favorite ‘armchair detectives’ is back…..though he’s less of an amateur and more of a professional than he was in the first books! The Charles Lenox series has been a fall fixture for me for quite some time. Some of the mysteries I liked better than others but this one was especially delightful. I loved being back in London, the last mystery was set in the country but there is something about London that works so much better for me in this series. It’s been so fun watching Lenox evolve throughout the series. Now he’s more middle age and finally finding success in his profession. I admire his dedication and resolve. I liked that this book was more about Lenox and less about some of the other characters. Many of my favorite characters make appearances but for the most part the mystery is mostly Lenox. This mystery kept me guessing right up until the end and I love how there was a secondary mystery being investigated that I am assuming will be a segway into the next book. In some ways I had hoped that that story line would have been more emphasized within the main story…..clearly the mystery that Dallington was working on was less important but I think it would have been nice to have Lenox’s and Dallington’s mysteries intersect in a different way than they were but overall I think it worked alright and look forward to seeing how that plot carries over into future books. There were plenty of ‘red herrings’ in this mystery to keep the reader interested and wondering what game was a foot. I enjoyed seeing how things panned out for Leigh, he was a funny character and I enjoyed getting to know him throughout the story. He was so unique from the typical Victorian ‘gentlemen’ or ‘men of science’ and I really really liked his character over all. I also loved that we got to see Lenox as a young man…..his compassion toward Leigh made him all the more endearing. Overall this book was another great installment to a long running series. As with all the Lenox books, I wonder what new adventures and mysteries await him. Though I do wonder what the end game is for Lenox…..being middle aged now what will his ultimate plan be? On one hand I feel like he has a lot more mysteries to solve but what will happen to the agency? Will Dallington and Polly run things with Lenox moving toward his home life and possibly migrating back to being more of an ‘armchair’ detective as he was in the early books? It sounds like that’s what Jane would like…..but will Charles want the same? See my full review here

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    I love Charles Lenox and his family and friends. I love Charles Finch's stories. And I really love James Langton's ability to narrate and bring these characters to life. A walk down memory lane with Charles and a school friend, a murder mystery and a Mysterious Benefactor are the central themes in this story. The doctor is doing well, John and Polly at odds over work, and Charles's friend is a hoot. I love Charles Lenox and his family and friends. I love Charles Finch's stories. And I really love James Langton's ability to narrate and bring these characters to life. A walk down memory lane with Charles and a school friend, a murder mystery and a Mysterious Benefactor are the central themes in this story. The doctor is doing well, John and Polly at odds over work, and Charles's friend is a hoot.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nerak

    It was okay but not enough to make me seek out any other books by this author. Got tired of the bogus historical factoids and trivia.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    A request for help from an old school friend sets Charles on an exploration into his memories of the past and a new test for his detecting skills. The way the author blends the personal stories of all the engaging regular characters, the setting of each case, and the historical background has me eager to plunge into each new installment in the series. The Inheritance is the tenth book in the closely connected Charles Lenox Mysteries series that works best read in order. Charles gets a letter from A request for help from an old school friend sets Charles on an exploration into his memories of the past and a new test for his detecting skills. The way the author blends the personal stories of all the engaging regular characters, the setting of each case, and the historical background has me eager to plunge into each new installment in the series. The Inheritance is the tenth book in the closely connected Charles Lenox Mysteries series that works best read in order. Charles gets a letter from the eccentric naturalist Gerald Leigh. Leigh was the odd duck out back in their school days at Harrow. He didn't fit in socially nor was he a very bright student, but Leigh excelled at anything living or growing outside. It has been years since the two were together other than the occasional letter and now Gerald Leigh is in London and needs Charles because he is in some sort of trouble and it might have something to do with the mysterious benefactor who paid for him to attend school. But, then Leigh vanishes and Charles fears foul play. While he pursues Gerald's case, Charles is also concerned about the emotional distance Lady Jane is putting between them and he has no idea about the cause and he is more than concerned about the abrasive atmosphere between his detecting partners, Dallington and Polly over the Parliament mystery they are working on. Like I said, there is a good mystery, a fascinating historical background of Victorian London and science, but also an engaging story of Charles and his friends' lives, loves, and investigating. The Inheritance was welcome because I enjoyed the flashbacks to Charles as a young student at Harrow befriending a guy that others ignored or bullied, and forming his first interest in detective work. I also enjoyed seeing Polly and John's story come to a crisis point and was touched by the tender situation that was going on with Lady Jane and Charles. The mystery was almost an afterthought for me. I enjoyed how it helped drive the story and made for some exciting moments though I did have the culprit and the motive tagged beforehand so just had to wait for Charles to get there. All in all, this series is one I anticipate each new installment and have yet to be disappointed. I learn fascinating historical tidbits, enjoy spending time with the characters, and appreciate a well-developed historical mystery. Definitely recommend.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Linda Baker

    t's a snowy, cold day in London and Charles Lenox is awaiting a visit from an old school friend, Gerald Leigh. Both men were at Harrow 30 years earlier and Lenox has seen him only a few times since. Leigh was a complete misfit at Harrow, eventually expelled, and Lenox was his only friend. So when Lenox receives a letter from Leigh, asking for his help, Charles is eager to see him. Gerald Leigh, however, never arrives and upon visiting his hotel the next day, Lenox finds that he was absent all ni t's a snowy, cold day in London and Charles Lenox is awaiting a visit from an old school friend, Gerald Leigh. Both men were at Harrow 30 years earlier and Lenox has seen him only a few times since. Leigh was a complete misfit at Harrow, eventually expelled, and Lenox was his only friend. So when Lenox receives a letter from Leigh, asking for his help, Charles is eager to see him. Gerald Leigh, however, never arrives and upon visiting his hotel the next day, Lenox finds that he was absent all night. As a detective and friend, Lenox sets out to find him. When he does, Leigh has a strange story to tell. He was living in France and received a letter informing him of an anonymous bequest of twenty-five thousand pounds sterling; a huge fortune in those days. Far from being a failure as Harrow predicted, Leigh is an internationally known scientist, much in demand among scientific circles. He is required to claim the bequest in person and also has a speaking engagement at the Royal Society. The inheritance echoes an earlier bequest in Leigh's life; an anonymous benefactor paid his school fees. Charles and Gerald tried to solve that mystery as boys but failed. Since arriving in England, Leigh has had two failed attempts on his life. As is ofter the case in the Charles Lenox novels there is a secondary mystery. The Lenox Agency is on retainer with Parliament. When there is a break-in at Parliament, Lenox's associates, Sir John Dallington and Polly Buchanan take the lead, sending Sir John in particular into great danger. The Charles Lenox Mysteries are perennial favorites and I think that The Inheritance is one of the best. Charles Finch achieves a splendid balance between plot, characterization, and historical detail. As a history geek, I love the small details that make the era come alive; such as the origin of the phrase, "by hook or by crook", and how fish and chips became so popular in England. As always, I highly recommend the series in general and The Inheritance in particular.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    4.5 star and getting better, better and best! #10 is splendid and takes place in the years 1877-78. Because one of these cases is LLLLOOONG- about 30 years long. And falls back to Charles' Harrow days; those years in which he was 16 and 17. In those two years of their former contact (1846-48), actually less than 2 because his friend becomes expelled-he forms a strange and unusual friendship with the Harrow rejected, Leigh. And in 1877, Leigh is clearly the opposite of rejected. But he is threate 4.5 star and getting better, better and best! #10 is splendid and takes place in the years 1877-78. Because one of these cases is LLLLOOONG- about 30 years long. And falls back to Charles' Harrow days; those years in which he was 16 and 17. In those two years of their former contact (1846-48), actually less than 2 because his friend becomes expelled-he forms a strange and unusual friendship with the Harrow rejected, Leigh. And in 1877, Leigh is clearly the opposite of rejected. But he is threatened/ attacked, as well. But other cases are progressing quite quickly and not on the pace of the inheritance question. One has to do with Parliament's building itself and a break-in there. Or is it a break-out? Polly and Lord D.- the other two partners are disagreeing about that procedural too, as it goes on and on. But Lenox himself is quite tied up in different directions all over London and especially within the gang of the Farthington's home turf because of Leigh's personal safety. We have multiple levels of society in this one. Particularly up to the scientific and the Royal Society for those and other arts. And a type of celeb feel too- as Leigh, just for a short time returned from France and long absence from England, is being courted for his brilliant scientific work. Numerous fields of the natural world, of course, but especially upon the new and just recently viewed object that he describes as a "microbe". And within all of this evasion- Lady Jane, Sophia, Toto and Edmund- none of them are left behind for long. They may be required to particularly hide themselves for short time periods now and again because of the danger Charles has trailed home that targets their locations. Lady Jane has some sorrow beyond this, and Charles intuits the cause. Edmund is more healed and working to the max for his district. The nephews are in other guises and work staying closer to home for him too, now. But beyond the points of the crisis for Leigh's plight somewhat averted! Well it isn't. Because that becomes just the beginning of another 3 or 4 separate plots/cases unwinding off the original one "work" scroll case. But do any of them earn profit? And what does Polly have to say about that? There is a reveal that becomes accompanied by severe physical result- unto death. And life long "afterwards" to a different reality for the person of mishap. And there is also an ultimate life long and professional adjustment for the agency too. But above all LONDON reigns as the main character and what a go it is. Every one of these Charles Finch for Charles Lenox has delicious and scrumptious and often quite nasty London prime Victoria. Like having the tot run back the bowl to the cart (can you image using the same bowl for a couple dozen customers' cheaper scrape type porridge)- and then when the scamp of 4 or 7 runs back the bowl, he earns his/her own refill? Details like that one. Or how by the year 1877-trying to use/gallop a horse and rider by singleton method (no cart, no carriage, no coach)through a London street in chase for time in saving a life was close to murder of others and suicide of your own? Both at the same time. Or that Harrow is 10 miles out of London proper then on a heavily used and strongly coached road and set in idyll of hill and field by choice. (Of course, it no longer is.) Fabulous read and now I must be super sad because I need to wait for more. Hopefully many more. This one will make all those people who are bored by "mostly talk, and little action" historical fiction- extremely happy. Plus it gives a window to very young Charles. He WAS ALWAYS rather obtuse to the joy and apt to be a heavy grindstone user. If that's not enough- the very last page offers a glowing revelation. Read them in order from #6 to #10- those for sure. London is changing and wilder all the time- highly recommend.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    I always approach a new Charles Finch mystery with the greatest anticipation because I know the plot will intrigue and the characters will be as dear to me as old acquaintances. Much of the reason for this is the author's voice which has remained faithful to his creations throughout the series. Even within the forms of Victorian prose, Finch's use of figurative language shines. He slips with ease into imagery such as this example from Lenox's musings, "Lenox could almost discern a pattern. It wa I always approach a new Charles Finch mystery with the greatest anticipation because I know the plot will intrigue and the characters will be as dear to me as old acquaintances. Much of the reason for this is the author's voice which has remained faithful to his creations throughout the series. Even within the forms of Victorian prose, Finch's use of figurative language shines. He slips with ease into imagery such as this example from Lenox's musings, "Lenox could almost discern a pattern. It was like looking at the reverse of a Persian carpet . . . in the threads there was the ghost of its true shape." In the development of plot, The Inheritance presents the full complement of the true mystery genre: a strong protagonist in the person of Charles Lenox, who has been an eminent detective for two decades; a deadly crime (or two); a full slate of possible suspects (red herrings too); a couple of plot twists; and clues, among which are a Greek dictionary, the definition of genius, and farthings. In addition, just when the reader begins to believe he has figured out the mystery and can relax, he is hit full-on with an unexpected and traumatic event that closely affects Lenox. The novel explores several universal themes, among them friendship, jealousy, unconditional love, obsessive egotism, and diffidence. The story begins with Lenox waiting in his home for a visit from an old school friend (in trouble it appears according to a letter received earlier in the day) whom he hasn't seen in thirty years. The friend, Gerald Leigh, has narrowly escaped two attempts on his life. He wants to consult Lenox. When Leigh fails to show up as scheduled, Lenox sets out to find him. Is the letter Leigh received informing him of an inheritance of twenty-five thousand pounds linked to the Mysterious Benefactor who paid his fees to Harrow after his father was killed? Lenox must discover which of the three suspects from their youthful investigations could have sent it. In addition to the technique of flashback, the novel spins several threads of the story simultaneously. Some of these threads involve characters that readers have come to love: Dr. McConnell and his wife Toto -- what is their secret that has so affected Lady Jane? Lord John Dallington has a dogged determination to solve the mystery of the broken window near the House of Commons in Parliament. Is his single-mindedness going to affect his relationship with Polly? There are quite a few scenes of subtle levity that caused me to laugh aloud. Finch shows a softer side of Lenox than we have previously seen. Also, as always, the author regales us with historical facts and details, such as how the completion of the railroads led to fish 'n chips becoming the premier signature dish of England; the prestige and form of the Royal Society; and allusions to the first modern detective story (Poe's Murders in the Rue Morgue); Louis Pasteur and vaccinations; microbes; and a very young Winston Churchill. Charles's former butler, now member of Parliament and ever a staunch friend, Graham, makes a couple of appearances. Charles's brother, Edmund, accompanies him to Cornwall on a quest for information. We relish the pages spent with these characters and the glimpses we get of Lady Jane and Sophia. The significance of the cover becomes clear late in the book -- very interesting -- and the mysteries are solved with Lenox's usual thoughtful detective work. The ultimate delight is a bit of a surprise at the end. This is another exciting mystery by a virtuoso author that always enchants.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    The Inheritance is book 10 in the Charles Lenox series and this time the mystery involves a childhood friend of Lenox, Gerald Leigh. As Lenox pursues the investigation into Gerald's current troubles, we are privy to his boyhood times at Harrow and his friendship with outsider, Gerald Leigh, thirty years previous. In fact, Lenox’s first case as a “detective” was helping Gerald get to the bottom of the mystery of finding out the identity of who was Gerald’s mysterious benefactor. Now, three decade The Inheritance is book 10 in the Charles Lenox series and this time the mystery involves a childhood friend of Lenox, Gerald Leigh. As Lenox pursues the investigation into Gerald's current troubles, we are privy to his boyhood times at Harrow and his friendship with outsider, Gerald Leigh, thirty years previous. In fact, Lenox’s first case as a “detective” was helping Gerald get to the bottom of the mystery of finding out the identity of who was Gerald’s mysterious benefactor. Now, three decades later, Gerald, now a successful, albeit eccentric, scientist has contacted his old friend because he is again the beneficiary of a mysterious inheritance and feels his life s in danger. I liked Gerald okay but his constant presence was like an intrusion into Lenox’s family life. He has re-appeared after being away from London for thirty years and his constant presence encroached on Graham time. Graham has been a constant and loyal presence at Lenox’s side for the last two decades; there is no replacing Graham. In the meantime, Lenox’s partners, lord John Dallington and Polly Buchanan, are staking out Parliament following a break-in. Their agency has been retained for investigative services for Parliament. However, Graham warns Lenox that there are forces trying to force out Lenox and his partners. Lord John has a feeling there is more to the break-in that meets the eye. His persistence leads to friction between him and Polly and a near-fatal incident. Interwoven with the superb mystery element is the reconnection between old friends as well as the richly drawn personal elements of Lenox’s world that include his friend Dr. McConnell, who has finally reclaimed his profession by working at the children’s hospital, despite objection by Toto’s uber wealthy family. The glimpses of personal aspects of Charles’ life with lady Jane balances out the suspense and gives the story its heart and soul. It was good to see McConnell happy and fulfilled personally and professionally. It is masterful how Finch weaves in history and mystery in each book. It was extremely interesting to learn the reason Britain drive on the left side of the road, a throwback to when knights travelled across the country. Also, lady Jane’s initial reaction to the installation of electric lights in her home was priceless. The ending scene was wonderful with Charles, Jane, and Sophia but I was left somewhat bereft not only by being caught up with the series but also by my beloved Graham left hanging. There was no mention of whether he had proposed to Miss Winston or her answer. I want this honorable, astute, kind man to know the same happiness with a wife and family of his own just like Charles now has. I have pre-ordered the next book and will be anxiously waiting until February to return to the world of Charles Lenox.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Judy Lesley

    I received an e-ARC of this novel through NetGalley and St. Martin's Press, Minotaur Books. This was one of those wonderfully enjoyable reading experiences that you wish didn't have to come to an end. I love the way Charles Finch can make words flow across a page and into my mind so that I feel comfortable and completely at one with the story that is being told. For some unknown reason I have allowed myself to miss out on the last few novels in this series. What a terrible shame, but how delightf I received an e-ARC of this novel through NetGalley and St. Martin's Press, Minotaur Books. This was one of those wonderfully enjoyable reading experiences that you wish didn't have to come to an end. I love the way Charles Finch can make words flow across a page and into my mind so that I feel comfortable and completely at one with the story that is being told. For some unknown reason I have allowed myself to miss out on the last few novels in this series. What a terrible shame, but how delightful to know that I can go back and pick them up and enjoy them all. Even if you've never read any of the Charles Lenox mystery series you can begin comfortably here with #10 and feel perfectly at home. I am always amazed at how easily some authors can handle that feat while others turn the backstory into clunky, unwieldy pieces of sentences that I just want to hurry through. Charles Lenox went to Harrow as a boy. Of course he did, it was, after all, a family tradition. He befriended the one boy who was a complete outcast because he had absolutely no niche in which he fit. He wasn't socially connected, he didn't come from wealth, he seemed to be the opposite of endowed with average intelligence, he couldn't play sports; in fact Gerald Leigh wanted nothing so much as to go back to Cornwall and get out of this world in which some mysterious benefactor had placed him. Over time Lenox and Leigh became friends and as young boys their main project was to try to find out who the MB was who provided the funding for Gerald to attend Harrow. MB being mysterious benefactor, someone they tried desperately to uncover, but failed. Now, thirty years later, Leigh has arrived in London to collect an inheritance left him by an anonymous benefactor. It simply must be MB. Thank goodness Lenox now has a detective agency so he can devote time to solving this mystery once and for all. The historical atmosphere in which the novel is set is wonderful. Again, Finch uses featherweight touches to bring the reader to notice the inventions in this age which were to change the world. January 1877 is snowy and cold in London when Charles Lenox receives a note from his friend asking for a meeting. Before it's all over months have passed and there are multiple mysteries which I was perfectly content to allow the author to solve for me and huge changes taking place in the lives of those closest to Lenox and his family. A splendid reading experience and my hope is that you will become as immersed in it as I was. Set aside some quiet time just for yourself and you won't be sorry.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    Perfect on many levels. Authentic voice and careful consistency in construction, faithful to original vision of who Charles Lenox is. Entering the Victorian world portrayed by this author is almost like walking into a wall for me, or perhaps falling into a cloud of quiet from a windy, noisy perch where I read most of my books. My guess is there are few writers who can manage a series of 10 mysteries, refusing to liven things up a bit with sidebar unsavory events in the guise of excitement. The V Perfect on many levels. Authentic voice and careful consistency in construction, faithful to original vision of who Charles Lenox is. Entering the Victorian world portrayed by this author is almost like walking into a wall for me, or perhaps falling into a cloud of quiet from a windy, noisy perch where I read most of my books. My guess is there are few writers who can manage a series of 10 mysteries, refusing to liven things up a bit with sidebar unsavory events in the guise of excitement. The Victorian world is brilliantly detailed in this book. Staid, dignified, polite, slow and possibly boring when held up against the modern world. It is a treat to enter it! Charles is allowed a trip in memory to childhood experiences at Harrow when contacted by an old school chum about a large inheritance from a mystery donor. We make a visit to the Royal Society, because this old friend turns out to be a highly regarded scientist who has been turning down offers from the Society to become a Fellow. Not scientifically inclined, Charles had been unaware of his old friend's career and success in this field. There is a plot of murder afoot, and Charles engages the Yard to help avoid disaster. The action brings them all in danger. There were several origins noted I had been ignorant of, such as the how and why of driving on the left vs the right of the road. Call me stupid, but it just was not something I ever thought to research. Future advances in scientific knowledge are nicely foreshadowed without making Lenox look a total nincompoop. I rather liked reading the origin of "bunk" as well. Educated and Entertained!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susan Springer

    Perhaps the best book of the series! Charles Lenox must try to save the life of his boyhood schoolmate, who against all odds, has become a world renowned microbiotic scientist. Is the agressor a secret benefactor or jealous colleague of the illustrious Royal Society? Finch's writing only gets better! Perhaps the best book of the series! Charles Lenox must try to save the life of his boyhood schoolmate, who against all odds, has become a world renowned microbiotic scientist. Is the agressor a secret benefactor or jealous colleague of the illustrious Royal Society? Finch's writing only gets better!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Daniella Bernett

    Another elegant and sophisticated mystery from Charles Finch. The lovely prose makes the story flow like waves lapping gently onto velvety sands. I think this is the best book yet in the Charles Lenox series. I cannot wait for the next book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    There are almost as many ways to write a mystery series as there are ways for the villains to murder their victims. You can write a series over a period of 40 years like Rex Stout, who set every story in present time and yet did not age Nero Wolfe or Archie Goodwin and friends a day. Each story stands on its own—there is little point to reading the series in order; the characters (including Wolfe’s NYC brownstone) are merely recurring. Agatha Christie did a similar thing with Hercule Poirot, exc There are almost as many ways to write a mystery series as there are ways for the villains to murder their victims. You can write a series over a period of 40 years like Rex Stout, who set every story in present time and yet did not age Nero Wolfe or Archie Goodwin and friends a day. Each story stands on its own—there is little point to reading the series in order; the characters (including Wolfe’s NYC brownstone) are merely recurring. Agatha Christie did a similar thing with Hercule Poirot, except she aged him with the times without changing his life or character, again creating a recurring character scenario, but with difficulties for herself as author with an increasingly decrepit sleuth. Both series only vaguely reference the fact that there are other cases in the series. Charles Finch has chosen to write his series featuring Victorian London detective Charles Lenox as a true series. Lenox ages as the books progress (about 7-8 years have passed over the 10 books), and Lenox’s life changes like a normal person’s might—he marries, becomes a father, changes careers, etc. Yet, each novel focuses on a particular case(s), so each book works on its own; however, the reader will be cheating themselves a bit if they don’t read the whole series. I don’t want to discourage anyone from diving in with The Inheritance; this is more a fair warning that you will want to go back and read the other nine books in the series when you are done. I enjoyed The Inheritance very much. We learn about Lenox’s days as a student at Harrow, when an old schoolmate, who received a mysterious bequest while in school, becomes the recipient of another that appears to have some dangerous strings attached, especially when the solicitor handling the new bequest is found murdered. The present and past become entangled, and only Lenox, with his clear analytical mind and first-hand experience of both can pick apart the problem, hopefully before his friend or he becomes the next victim. Author Finch delivers another strong plot with plenty of twists, and continues his signature habit (at least in my mind) of having quite a bit of story left to tell after solving the main case—no skipping to the last page to find out whodunit. Dallington and Polly, Lenox’s partners in their detective agency, work their own case involving a break-in at Parliament. The novel is satisfying both in terms of this novel as a standalone and as the major story arc over the length of the series. Lenox and company are a wonderful group to hang with, and the Victorian London setting is so well rendered that I want to wrap up under a cozy blanket with a cup of tea even if it’s over 90 degrees outside. The main problem with having read this as an advance reader copy, is that I shall have to wait even longer for the next book to come out. Highly recommended.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Critterbee❇

    Another masterpiece from Charles Finch! The first page immediately captured me. I had no chance to slowly sink into the story, but was thrust immediately into the intrigue. The pace, while not breakneck, was consistent and steady, never slacking. The story held me throughout the entire book. As sometimes happens with the Charles Lenox mysteries, there were several mysteries to be solved. The central one involved an old school friend in deadly peril. Problems at Parliament and an school-age mystery Another masterpiece from Charles Finch! The first page immediately captured me. I had no chance to slowly sink into the story, but was thrust immediately into the intrigue. The pace, while not breakneck, was consistent and steady, never slacking. The story held me throughout the entire book. As sometimes happens with the Charles Lenox mysteries, there were several mysteries to be solved. The central one involved an old school friend in deadly peril. Problems at Parliament and an school-age mystery added to the intrigue parade. There are many flashbacks to Lenox's school days at Harrow. I am a great fan of the Charles Lenox Mysteries. They are all set in rapidly changing Victorian era England, full of historical references and thoroughly referenced facts about daily life, and never going too gory or macabre. The characters are consistent, believable, time-period appropriate, and very likable. Because Finch is so particularly detailed in every other area, I felt that I wanted more insight and more details about his relationships with his wife and brother. This book focused on his friendship with Leigh (his school friend), and he was able to effectively convey so much emotion that I felt that I really understood it. I wanted the same about his wife and brother! Perhaps he is spreading those relationship details over the series, and you take them bit by bit. I highly recommend this series for the brilliant storytelling, the accurate historic details, and the cleverly crafted mysteries. **eARC Netgalley**

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    The Inheritance by Charles Finch is set in Victorian England and continues this historical mystery series that I've enjoyed for several years. When private investigator Charles Lennox receives a message from Gerald Leigh, an old school friend, he is eager to see him, but when Lennox tries to get in touch with his friend, he finds that he has disappeared. After finally locating Leigh, Lennox learns that the reason for his friend's disappearance is that someone has tried to kill him. The novel cont The Inheritance by Charles Finch is set in Victorian England and continues this historical mystery series that I've enjoyed for several years. When private investigator Charles Lennox receives a message from Gerald Leigh, an old school friend, he is eager to see him, but when Lennox tries to get in touch with his friend, he finds that he has disappeared. After finally locating Leigh, Lennox learns that the reason for his friend's disappearance is that someone has tried to kill him. The novel contains many reminisces of Lennox and Leigh's friendship as adolescents at Harrow and the mystery the two tried--and failed--to solve about who was funding Leigh's expensive education. Leigh, now a prominent scientist, has returned to England, summoned by a lawyer who is handling a large, anonymous bequest left to Leigh. Lennox and Leigh want to discover if this is the same benefactor who paid for Leigh's schooling at Harrow and what the inheritance has to do with someone trying to murder him. read in July; blog review scheduled for Oct. 10 NetGalley/St. Martin's Press/Minotaur Books Historic Mystery. Nov. 1, 2016. Print length: 304 pages.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Wright

    With "The Inheritance" Charles Finch proves his ability to not only sustain a long running series, but keep it fresh and surprising. Charles Lenox is as engaging a character as ever. I loved the flashbacks to Lenox as a youth and appreciated the skill used to develop his character from the ground up, if you will. The several mysteries running simultaneously were deftly handled with the skill of a master storyteller and led to a conclusion that was not only breathtaking, but very, very satisfying With "The Inheritance" Charles Finch proves his ability to not only sustain a long running series, but keep it fresh and surprising. Charles Lenox is as engaging a character as ever. I loved the flashbacks to Lenox as a youth and appreciated the skill used to develop his character from the ground up, if you will. The several mysteries running simultaneously were deftly handled with the skill of a master storyteller and led to a conclusion that was not only breathtaking, but very, very satisfying. Although the book would stand alone, I hope readers will start with the first book "A Beautiful Blue Death" and watch this character grow over the course of the series. It is a lovely ride and I envy anyone who starts that journey.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    The Charles Lenox series just keeps getting better and better ... this time old school ties that cross class lines prove very strong and the whole class question keeps getting tossed on its head -- love and family and friends prove strong, and watching a boy expelled from school when young turn into one of the leading scientists of his time feels so good. I love Finch's nimble humor, in his dedication, for example. It's also fun to learn bits of fact -- where "cab" came from, and why British dri The Charles Lenox series just keeps getting better and better ... this time old school ties that cross class lines prove very strong and the whole class question keeps getting tossed on its head -- love and family and friends prove strong, and watching a boy expelled from school when young turn into one of the leading scientists of his time feels so good. I love Finch's nimble humor, in his dedication, for example. It's also fun to learn bits of fact -- where "cab" came from, and why British drive on the left and Americans on right, and more. Definite re-read!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amy Koehler

    3 mysteries run along Charles Lenox's gentleman's life in 19th century London. This time familial and professional relationships of disappointed or misguided expectations intersect with ambition and ultimately with the search for the hidden truth of the matter. What does one inherit? Money? Expectations? Fame and regard? Delightful and a bit intense, but still Victorian! As always a lovely read... 3 mysteries run along Charles Lenox's gentleman's life in 19th century London. This time familial and professional relationships of disappointed or misguided expectations intersect with ambition and ultimately with the search for the hidden truth of the matter. What does one inherit? Money? Expectations? Fame and regard? Delightful and a bit intense, but still Victorian! As always a lovely read...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    So much going on in this newest book. And all of it good. By the end we know all the characters much better than we did before and make the acquaintance of new ones. One in particular is very endearing. As usual cannot wait for the next Lenox! Sorry I can't really review. I'd give far too much away. So much going on in this newest book. And all of it good. By the end we know all the characters much better than we did before and make the acquaintance of new ones. One in particular is very endearing. As usual cannot wait for the next Lenox! Sorry I can't really review. I'd give far too much away.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Another exceptionally well-written book in my favorite historical mystery series. Readers of historical fiction will not find a more entertaining or informative set of stories. If you haven't met Charles Lennox, then do yourself a favor. Another exceptionally well-written book in my favorite historical mystery series. Readers of historical fiction will not find a more entertaining or informative set of stories. If you haven't met Charles Lennox, then do yourself a favor.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I love this series. The books are always well researched and the local descriptions well done. You really start to get into peoples' lives in this series. I find it comparable to early Anne Perry. Definitely would recommend. I love this series. The books are always well researched and the local descriptions well done. You really start to get into peoples' lives in this series. I find it comparable to early Anne Perry. Definitely would recommend.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Curtis Sawyer

    Another Great Charles Lenox Mystery The latest Charles Lenox mystery is another great one. There are enough twists to keep you guessing, and as with prior books the passage of time leaves its mark on the characters and their lives.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This is my favorite Charles Lenox Mystery. The book finds the perfect balance between the familiar, personal stories of the characters and the tightly-woven, compelling mystery. Seamless execution. What a satisfying read!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    Another entry in a pleasurable series that is always handsomely executed.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Judith

    One of my favourite historical crime authors.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    Great read Another great twist. The characters are enchanting and oh so loyal. Always ready for the next one to be published.

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