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The Golden Compass Graphic Novel, Volume 2

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The eagerly awaited second volume in the graphic novel adaptation of Philip Pullman’s international bestseller The Golden Compass.     This second volume of the graphic novel finds Lyra in the far North. With the help of Gyptian fighters, newfound witch allies, and the armored bear Iorek Byrnison, she means to rescue the children held captive by the notorious Gobblers.   The eagerly awaited second volume in the graphic novel adaptation of Philip Pullman’s international bestseller The Golden Compass.     This second volume of the graphic novel finds Lyra in the far North. With the help of Gyptian fighters, newfound witch allies, and the armored bear Iorek Byrnison, she means to rescue the children held captive by the notorious Gobblers.   The stunning full-color art offers both new and returning readers a chance to experience the story of Lyra, an ordinary girl with an extraordinary role to play in the fates of multiple worlds, in an entirely unique way.   Published in 50 countries with over 22 million copies sold, The Golden Compass, The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass are renowned for their engrossing storytelling and epic scope. These modern classics are must-reads for every book lover.   Praise for The Golden Compass Graphic Novel, vol. 1:   “The story’s signature fantasies—the dæmons, the armored mercenary polar bears, and the alethiometer—are realized with compelling force (and, in the case of the dæmons, humor). [This] retelling will bring Pullman’s work new fans and give previous readers new pleasure.” —Publishers Weekly, Starred   “Whether this is a reader’s first experience with the tale or they are already familiar with the story, they should be delighted by this rendition.” —School Library Journal   “The small and detailed but very clear panels are full of expressive faces, discernible action, and moody shadowing. Readers familiar with Pullman’s novel will appreciate this artistic adaptation, as will readers who simply prefer graphic novels to prose.” —Booklist


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The eagerly awaited second volume in the graphic novel adaptation of Philip Pullman’s international bestseller The Golden Compass.     This second volume of the graphic novel finds Lyra in the far North. With the help of Gyptian fighters, newfound witch allies, and the armored bear Iorek Byrnison, she means to rescue the children held captive by the notorious Gobblers.   The eagerly awaited second volume in the graphic novel adaptation of Philip Pullman’s international bestseller The Golden Compass.     This second volume of the graphic novel finds Lyra in the far North. With the help of Gyptian fighters, newfound witch allies, and the armored bear Iorek Byrnison, she means to rescue the children held captive by the notorious Gobblers.   The stunning full-color art offers both new and returning readers a chance to experience the story of Lyra, an ordinary girl with an extraordinary role to play in the fates of multiple worlds, in an entirely unique way.   Published in 50 countries with over 22 million copies sold, The Golden Compass, The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass are renowned for their engrossing storytelling and epic scope. These modern classics are must-reads for every book lover.   Praise for The Golden Compass Graphic Novel, vol. 1:   “The story’s signature fantasies—the dæmons, the armored mercenary polar bears, and the alethiometer—are realized with compelling force (and, in the case of the dæmons, humor). [This] retelling will bring Pullman’s work new fans and give previous readers new pleasure.” —Publishers Weekly, Starred   “Whether this is a reader’s first experience with the tale or they are already familiar with the story, they should be delighted by this rendition.” —School Library Journal   “The small and detailed but very clear panels are full of expressive faces, discernible action, and moody shadowing. Readers familiar with Pullman’s novel will appreciate this artistic adaptation, as will readers who simply prefer graphic novels to prose.” —Booklist

30 review for The Golden Compass Graphic Novel, Volume 2

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    I wouldn't for a minute argue that you or anyone (no matter how young) should read this series based on Phillip Pullman's His Dark Materials instead of the original books. But maybe if you do read them first, you will get intrigued enough to chance the original series. My appreciation for the original has only been enhanced by reading these short dialogue- and image-centric comics versions of the story. I think especially at first when the focus is on action it is okay to sort of fly through the I wouldn't for a minute argue that you or anyone (no matter how young) should read this series based on Phillip Pullman's His Dark Materials instead of the original books. But maybe if you do read them first, you will get intrigued enough to chance the original series. My appreciation for the original has only been enhanced by reading these short dialogue- and image-centric comics versions of the story. I think especially at first when the focus is on action it is okay to sort of fly through the story. I have no idea whether the comics approach will work well through some of the longer, more reflective work in the second and third books. I think the art is lovely, but the book--maybe to make it affordable--is a little too small, making the panels too small, of course, too cramped for the available space. No chance to breathe. But given those constraints it is still good work, I thought, capturing the general essence of the tale. And through the second volume, what a tale it is!

  2. 4 out of 5

    rachel ☾

    1.5 stars I have little else to say about the second volume of this graphic novel adaptation series that differs from my thoughts on the first volume. The writers still struggled with pacing and world-building. Information is so poorly conveyed to the reader about the circumstances of Lyra’s journey. I found it hard to follow. Each scene could easily have been expanded. I was constantly left wanting more. Worst of all? Iorek. My favourite character reduced to some sort of cuddly polar bear pet t 1.5 stars I have little else to say about the second volume of this graphic novel adaptation series that differs from my thoughts on the first volume. The writers still struggled with pacing and world-building. Information is so poorly conveyed to the reader about the circumstances of Lyra’s journey. I found it hard to follow. Each scene could easily have been expanded. I was constantly left wanting more. Worst of all? Iorek. My favourite character reduced to some sort of cuddly polar bear pet thing with little of the character development Pullman intended. I will say that the art was slightly better than in the first volume; solely because of the icy aesthetic of some of the scenes and landscapes. I will not be bothering with the third volume when it is released. I cannot deal with any more disappointment.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nouk

    Borrowed this from the library, that's why I started with part 2. I've read the original book, and this follows that very closely. This doesn't add a lot to the original. I do think this graphic novel is better than the film tho. The art is quite pretty. I really like the colours used and the more rough artstyle. Borrowed this from the library, that's why I started with part 2. I've read the original book, and this follows that very closely. This doesn't add a lot to the original. I do think this graphic novel is better than the film tho. The art is quite pretty. I really like the colours used and the more rough artstyle.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Superb continuation of Pullman's series in graphic form. Superb continuation of Pullman's series in graphic form.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Salome Vonk

    this was a good book i just wish that the author finished in this book instead of having to find the next book but I'm excited to find the next book to find out what happened. this was a good book i just wish that the author finished in this book instead of having to find the next book but I'm excited to find the next book to find out what happened.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    Not really much more to say about this one, as compared to The Golden Compass Graphic Novel, Volume 1. Still not having read the original Pullman novels, I can't say how accurate an adaptation it is. This one is better than the first volume, but it's still nowhere good enough to spawn all the hype that the original novels did. The actual adaptation of the novel was handled a little better than in the first volume, though I think that's because most of the world building was in that first book. He Not really much more to say about this one, as compared to The Golden Compass Graphic Novel, Volume 1. Still not having read the original Pullman novels, I can't say how accurate an adaptation it is. This one is better than the first volume, but it's still nowhere good enough to spawn all the hype that the original novels did. The actual adaptation of the novel was handled a little better than in the first volume, though I think that's because most of the world building was in that first book. Here, we can actually get the story moving a bit more, with significantly fewer 'long tedious dialogue-based explanations.' It is still very dialogue-heavy, but not nearly as bad. Then there's the art - again, better than the first volume, but still not great. The character designs are really the worst part - very flat and basic. The scenery and backgrounds are actually very pretty, very watercolor-esque. I did enjoy those, and I think that's why I feel the art was better in this volume - more scenery, less people. Also, the increase in scenery views means that the actual layouts were more varied. Still very gridded, but there were more larger pictures (maybe 2 rows high instead of the same row height throughout - variety!) Still not a lot of the large squares, and almost no splash pages. And I know this is a stylistic design choice, but it was very boring visually, especially when paired with so much dialogue. I could deal with the superficial dialogue-based handling of the plot if the art was good. Unfortunately, it's just not. In short, if you're already familiar with the stories and just want to revisit a familiar world, you might enjoy this. If this is your first introduction to Lyra's world (like it was mine), you'll be left wondering what all the fuss is. Save your time and just read the novels instead.

  7. 4 out of 5

    E2 Roxane

    I have finished this book. The girl became a person that looks at the constellation and was very happy with her life even if college time didn't go very well. I really enjoyed this book a lot and hope to find an interesting one for my next book. I have finished this book. The girl became a person that looks at the constellation and was very happy with her life even if college time didn't go very well. I really enjoyed this book a lot and hope to find an interesting one for my next book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katie (Kitkatscanread)

    Really enjoyed this graphic novel. It definitely helps paint a picture from the great children's trilogy. Really enjoyed this graphic novel. It definitely helps paint a picture from the great children's trilogy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gulshan Naqvee

    My review is still the same as for the first Volume. .Rare reading material, believe me.. extremely fantastic..but ugly graphics.. utterly ugly art.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mythili

    This book has very strong bande dessinée energy (e.g. Jean de Florette) which I shouldn't be surprising considering that this is, indeed, originally known as Les Royaumes du Nord: Tome 2. That being said, there's still something a bit removed when I read these, and I'm not super surprised that it seems like the third volume wasn't published. Every character is a bit different from their book iterations, and I'm not against adaptations (see: the 15,000 Jane Austen retellings that I read) but every This book has very strong bande dessinée energy (e.g. Jean de Florette) which I shouldn't be surprising considering that this is, indeed, originally known as Les Royaumes du Nord: Tome 2. That being said, there's still something a bit removed when I read these, and I'm not super surprised that it seems like the third volume wasn't published. Every character is a bit different from their book iterations, and I'm not against adaptations (see: the 15,000 Jane Austen retellings that I read) but every change seems to be exactly the wrong one for me. A key example: Iorek's half-man/half-bear mannerisms (he is sometimes on all fours, sometimes on two hind legs and drawn in a very human stance, sometimes lying on his back with his hands behind his head in a similarly human stance) fly in the face of the fundamental premise that the panserbjørne of Svalbard were lost because they were losing their essential bear-ish-ness. Again, I love this series and would do anything to spend more time in it...but I can tell that while reading these comics I'm just remembering details from the books (and trying my hardest to not have my mental images of the characters rewritten, a tall order given that we already have a perfectly cast adaptation) (RIP New Line Cinema).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark McKenny

    Took a while to get this second one, but it makes you realise the hard work that goes into creating these graphic novels. Again, I'm thankful that these are being made. The His Dark Materials trilogy played a massive part in my childhood. I think, apart from Harry Potter, they were the first books I was ever fully engrossed in as a child and young teenager. Maybe more so with Pullman because these books felt more human, more important somehow. And now as a 28 year old, I am enjoying these books Took a while to get this second one, but it makes you realise the hard work that goes into creating these graphic novels. Again, I'm thankful that these are being made. The His Dark Materials trilogy played a massive part in my childhood. I think, apart from Harry Potter, they were the first books I was ever fully engrossed in as a child and young teenager. Maybe more so with Pullman because these books felt more human, more important somehow. And now as a 28 year old, I am enjoying these books yet again, but this time in graphic novel format. I love the style of illustration and I think it suits the storyline really well. There's a lot going on in his volume, and for that reason it loses a star. It all just seems to happen so fast, we have no recap of what's happened in volume 1 (which I guess would be a waste, but still..) and we go through a good portion of the book, in what? 80 pages? Lee Scoresby, a huge character for me, just kind of gets thrown in (I think) and the witch story and everything is all just a bit fast. There was a moment at the end where I was thinking hold on, who's that? I still don't know, and I don't think that's down to me not following the story properly, I think it's down to everything just going that bit too fast. However it's a great graphic novel, and I eagerly await volume 3!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kassy Harris

    The second volume of this graphic novel was definitely better than the first, but I still can't say that I was impressed. And even though it was much better than the first volume, there was literally one thing that kept me from caving and giving it three stars. Iorek Byrnison. Certainly one of the best characters in the Golden Compass , this version of him is just sad. When Lyra first meets him, he's less than impressive. In the book, I was terrified of Iorek. Especially once Lyra told him whe The second volume of this graphic novel was definitely better than the first, but I still can't say that I was impressed. And even though it was much better than the first volume, there was literally one thing that kept me from caving and giving it three stars. Iorek Byrnison. Certainly one of the best characters in the Golden Compass , this version of him is just sad. When Lyra first meets him, he's less than impressive. In the book, I was terrified of Iorek. Especially once Lyra told him where his armor was and he basically went on a rampage. In this graphic novel, Iorek doesn't even seem to be intimidating. There are a lot of panels where Iorek is drawn a lot like a person, and it just seems very silly to me. In addition to the issues I had with the first volume, this was the cherry on top that made me really dislike this version of the Golden Compass .

  13. 5 out of 5

    Helen Leigh-Phippard

    On the whole I enjoyed this and it certainly reminded me that there is so much more to Philip Pullman's books than was captured in The Golden Compass film, which I’ve seen much more recently than I read the first novel. So reading this has made me want to revisit the original books and that’s definitely a positive. As for the negatives, well I think the book is expensive for such a thin volume - I don’t really understand why it stops where it does rather than finishing the story. The comic boxes On the whole I enjoyed this and it certainly reminded me that there is so much more to Philip Pullman's books than was captured in The Golden Compass film, which I’ve seen much more recently than I read the first novel. So reading this has made me want to revisit the original books and that’s definitely a positive. As for the negatives, well I think the book is expensive for such a thin volume - I don’t really understand why it stops where it does rather than finishing the story. The comic boxes are tiny, which makes them difficult to see at times and they're not always easy to understand, even when you're a fan and have read the books, seen the film etc. So while I desperately wanted to like this enough to give it at least 4 stars, I can’t.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elna

    After I finished the first part of this adaptation, I started watching the new BBC series, and then read a review/article/something that opened my eyes to the fact that a lot of people were shown without daemons. For TV this kind of makes sense, because that's a lot of budget/work for animals that will only be on screen for a little bit. There's no excuse here (I want to see the Samoyed daemons! I want crowded panels full of daemons and people!), and the coloring was inconsistent (in one panel t After I finished the first part of this adaptation, I started watching the new BBC series, and then read a review/article/something that opened my eyes to the fact that a lot of people were shown without daemons. For TV this kind of makes sense, because that's a lot of budget/work for animals that will only be on screen for a little bit. There's no excuse here (I want to see the Samoyed daemons! I want crowded panels full of daemons and people!), and the coloring was inconsistent (in one panel the brunette Mrs. Coulter has blonde hair, for example). And they're SO SHORT. Maybe I'll wait for the omnibus, but I won't be holding my breath. The design of Iorek's armor is very naturalistic and realistic, at least.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I liked this a little better than the first one, it seemed to flow better and to remain true to the original narrative while making slight changes for the format (but these changes were pretty seamless). Saying I like it better than book one is not saying much, however. I think this might just have been made too childish (don’t argue with me that these are children’s books), I don’t think they work well that way or make enough sense for children. There is still too much information.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carmen Liffengren

    This graphic novel is really hard to review because my thoughts are more about the story and less about the illustrations. It's just dark and cold in the far North. Although Lyra is courageous and interesting, she's just not very likable. So much of the time, I just wanted to stand in awe of the Northern Lights and get away from this story. This graphic novel is really hard to review because my thoughts are more about the story and less about the illustrations. It's just dark and cold in the far North. Although Lyra is courageous and interesting, she's just not very likable. So much of the time, I just wanted to stand in awe of the Northern Lights and get away from this story.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alana Marie

    Still a 2.5/5 ~ I had issues with the art and pacing in the first volume. Obviously, I didn't expect any changes in the art, but I had hoped that the pacing might feel less rushed in this volume. Unfortunately, it felt like more of the same. Still a 2.5/5 ~ I had issues with the art and pacing in the first volume. Obviously, I didn't expect any changes in the art, but I had hoped that the pacing might feel less rushed in this volume. Unfortunately, it felt like more of the same.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Good.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Juniperus

    super nice art as usual. makes me wanna reread the novel

  20. 5 out of 5

    Donna Luu

    I think this story is too ambitious for a graphic novel and too difficult to illustrate. Still, it's pretty entertaining. I think this story is too ambitious for a graphic novel and too difficult to illustrate. Still, it's pretty entertaining.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daisy

    Quality Rating: Four Stars Enjoyment Rating: Four Stars

  22. 5 out of 5

    Liz Yerby

    Yes yes yes heckin love it // I almost cried? Why do I care so much! The art is perfect

  23. 4 out of 5

    Fi

    A continuation of the golden compass graphic novel. It was really good! Making me want to read the books again. I hope my library has volume 3!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Beary Into Books

    Rating 5

  25. 5 out of 5

    Graham Whittington

    Marginally improves over the first volume of the graphic novel but still pales in comparison to the original novel.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

    Here's the thing-I like the story, the illustrations, and the characters. It's hard to put this graphic novel down because I want to know what happens to everyone. That said, the violence depicted is gruesome and it makes it hard to recommend to the young adults it would attract. Here's the thing-I like the story, the illustrations, and the characters. It's hard to put this graphic novel down because I want to know what happens to everyone. That said, the violence depicted is gruesome and it makes it hard to recommend to the young adults it would attract.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    This excellent graphic novel adaptation of The Golden Compass series follows Lyra as she cobbles together some unexpected allies enroute to rescuing the young prisoners held by the Gobblers. With help from Lee Scoresby and my favorite character, the powerful armored bear, Iorek Byrnison, and a troupe of witches, Lyra presses onward, even meeting up once again with Mrs. Coulter, who is just as charming and frightening as ever. The colors in each panel of the story are simply sumptuous, sure to de This excellent graphic novel adaptation of The Golden Compass series follows Lyra as she cobbles together some unexpected allies enroute to rescuing the young prisoners held by the Gobblers. With help from Lee Scoresby and my favorite character, the powerful armored bear, Iorek Byrnison, and a troupe of witches, Lyra presses onward, even meeting up once again with Mrs. Coulter, who is just as charming and frightening as ever. The colors in each panel of the story are simply sumptuous, sure to delight fans of the series because of the artist's attention to detail, even while the story hooks them and makes them gnash their teeth in concern for Lyra and Pantalaimon, her daemon, as well as those who surround them. Fans of the series will fall in love with the series and its characters all over again while newcomers will surely seek out the books in their original form. Even though I knew what was going to happen, I still turned each page breathlessly, eagerly awaiting new wonders.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Duncan Wilson

    This is the second part of Stéphanie Melchior’s adaptation of Philip Pullman’s northern lights. I have never had a chance to read the books themselves (although I promise I wll get round to it eventually) and this is a nice way into that universe however I did get the impression that there was a lot of detail missing and this volume seems a lot more busy than the first part. There is a lot going on and not a lot of explanation as to why. It also took me a while to realise that Pantalaimon wasn’t This is the second part of Stéphanie Melchior’s adaptation of Philip Pullman’s northern lights. I have never had a chance to read the books themselves (although I promise I wll get round to it eventually) and this is a nice way into that universe however I did get the impression that there was a lot of detail missing and this volume seems a lot more busy than the first part. There is a lot going on and not a lot of explanation as to why. It also took me a while to realise that Pantalaimon wasn’t just a cute ferret but could actually change shape. However Clément Oubrerie's illustrations have a very cinematic approach and convey action as effectively as still scenes and manage to evoke a real world atmosphere this is very familiar but ever so slightly removed. It is not entirely to my tastes but is enjoyable regardless.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kereesa

    2018 Same, Carissa, same. 2016 Even though this was in French, and there is an English equivalent, the gn series was created for the French translation of Pullman's text and that's the way I'm reading it. And it works wonderfully well. The art isn't the greatest, but there is so much care and love for this series that I can't help but adore it. And weirdly, despite having only read HDM in English, I felt the beats of it echo in the words. Translations can be off, but this one just makes me melt int 2018 Same, Carissa, same. 2016 Even though this was in French, and there is an English equivalent, the gn series was created for the French translation of Pullman's text and that's the way I'm reading it. And it works wonderfully well. The art isn't the greatest, but there is so much care and love for this series that I can't help but adore it. And weirdly, despite having only read HDM in English, I felt the beats of it echo in the words. Translations can be off, but this one just makes me melt into mush all over again. As this is seriously probably my favorite series ever, I can't describe to you how heartfelt reading this gem made me feel. I can't wait to have enough cash to go buy the first and third volumes of this.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    I've always liked the character of Lyra, and I am intrigued by the characters in the second book, especially the armored bear Iorek Byrnison and the witch Serafina Pekkala. Excellent colors in this book! I've always liked the character of Lyra, and I am intrigued by the characters in the second book, especially the armored bear Iorek Byrnison and the witch Serafina Pekkala. Excellent colors in this book!

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