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Lady Susan, the Watsons, Sandition, and the Complete Juvenilia (1000 Copy Limited Edition)

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Lady Susan seeks a new husband for herself and one for her daughter. But Lady Susan is a selfish, unscrupulous and scheming woman, highly attractive to men, who tries to trap the best possible husband while maintaining a relationship with a married man. She subverts all the standards of the romantic novel: she has an active role, she is not only beautiful but intelligent a Lady Susan seeks a new husband for herself and one for her daughter. But Lady Susan is a selfish, unscrupulous and scheming woman, highly attractive to men, who tries to trap the best possible husband while maintaining a relationship with a married man. She subverts all the standards of the romantic novel: she has an active role, she is not only beautiful but intelligent and witty, and her suitors are significantly younger than she is. Also included is The Watsons, Sandition, and the complete Juvenilia. Austen's works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature. Her realism, biting irony and social commentary as well as her acclaimed plots have gained her historical importance among scholars and critics.


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Lady Susan seeks a new husband for herself and one for her daughter. But Lady Susan is a selfish, unscrupulous and scheming woman, highly attractive to men, who tries to trap the best possible husband while maintaining a relationship with a married man. She subverts all the standards of the romantic novel: she has an active role, she is not only beautiful but intelligent a Lady Susan seeks a new husband for herself and one for her daughter. But Lady Susan is a selfish, unscrupulous and scheming woman, highly attractive to men, who tries to trap the best possible husband while maintaining a relationship with a married man. She subverts all the standards of the romantic novel: she has an active role, she is not only beautiful but intelligent and witty, and her suitors are significantly younger than she is. Also included is The Watsons, Sandition, and the complete Juvenilia. Austen's works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature. Her realism, biting irony and social commentary as well as her acclaimed plots have gained her historical importance among scholars and critics.

30 review for Lady Susan, the Watsons, Sandition, and the Complete Juvenilia (1000 Copy Limited Edition)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dr.J.G.

    ............ ............ Jane Austen Juvenilia and Short Stories: Lady Suzan, The Watsons, Sandition, Plan of a Novel, Sir Charles Grandison and Juvenilia in Three Volumes, by Jane Austen. ............ ............ Lady Suzan The Watsons Sandition Plan of a Novel Sir Charles Grandison ............ ............ JUVENILIA ............ ............ INTRODUCTION ............ ............ JUVENILIA Volume 1 FREDERIC AND ELFRIDA (1787-1793) JACK AND ALICE (1787-1793) EDGAR AND EMMA (1787-1793) HENRY AND ELIZA (1787- ............ ............ Jane Austen Juvenilia and Short Stories: Lady Suzan, The Watsons, Sandition, Plan of a Novel, Sir Charles Grandison and Juvenilia in Three Volumes, by Jane Austen. ............ ............ Lady Suzan The Watsons Sandition Plan of a Novel Sir Charles Grandison ............ ............ JUVENILIA ............ ............ INTRODUCTION ............ ............ JUVENILIA Volume 1 FREDERIC AND ELFRIDA (1787-1793) JACK AND ALICE (1787-1793) EDGAR AND EMMA (1787-1793) HENRY AND ELIZA (1787-1793) THE ADVENTURES OF MR. HARLEY (1787-1793) SIR WILLIAM MOUNTAGUE (1787-1793) MEMOIRS OF MR. CLIFFORD (1787-1793) THE BEAUTIFUL CASSANDRA (1787-1793) AMELIA WEBSTER (1787-1793) THE VISIT (1797-1793) THE MYSTERY (1787-1793) THE THREE SISTERS (1787-1793) DETACHED PIECES (1787-1793) ............ ............ JUVENILIA Volume 2 LOVE AND FREINDSHIP (1787-1793) LESLEY CASTLE (1787-1793) THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND (1787-1793) A COLLECTION OF LETTERS (1787-1793) SCRAPS (1787-1793) ............ ............ JUVENILIA Volume 3 EVELYN (1787-1793) CATHARINE (1787-1793) ............ ............ Reviews ............ ............ Lady Susan If one never knew anyone of this sort, one would think the character is entirely invented. At that it is not that uncommon to come across men who deal with their own children, especially daughters, this cruelly or worse, but they are excused or even pressured to be this cruel and admired for it in various cultures (not excepting west or US for that matter) while women are usually this cruel with children of other women, say a lover's wife or a sister in law. But the character therefore is entirely possible, especially in an era when a woman could only obtain wealth and consequence by marriages her own and her relatives'; and the only area she could use her mind however sharp was in fields related to intrigues of social sort, marriages, love affaires, and so on, especially gossip and vile gossip about other women. This unfortunately is what far too many women and even men use their minds for, even now, for sport and not for want of subjects that could use the sharp minds. Sometimes it is the heart of such a gossiper and mud thrower that is at fault seriously in that destroying another person is the pleasure, and use of mind and other facilities is merely a means. Lady Susan comes as a surprise therefore not because of the subject but the author who chose to write it, since Jane Austen usually is as clear as a sunny day in desert about virtues and vices, and condemning not only the latter but even faults of character that might seem only human today but do lead to follies or tragedies even today often enough unquestionably. Here Austen chooses the letter form prevalent in her time, and avoids commentary, except in letters of another character, giving equal voice to two opposite characters as it were. The story ends well as all Austen tales do to reward virtue, protect innocent and punish vice or folly only in measure. A window as always to her time, and informative in that as well. July 05, 2010. ............ ............ Watsons One wishes she had had time to write it up as she did others; here is an outline written in her green years. ............ ............ Sanditon (1817) ............ ............ Austen is delightful as ever, in her way of quite succinctly judging characters she writes about. "Upon the whole, Mr. Parker was evidently an amiable family man, fond of wife, children, brothers and sisters, and generally kind-hearted; liberal, gentlemanlike, easy to please; of a sanguine turn of mind, with more imagination than judgement. And Mrs. Parker was as evidently a gentle, amiable, sweet-tempered woman, the properest wife in the world for a man of strong understanding but not of a capacity to supply the cooler reflection which her own husband sometimes needed; and so entirely waiting to be guided on every occasion that whether he was risking his fortune or spraining his ankle, she remained equally useless." What with Mr. Parker promoting Sandition with a faith in sea air and bathing as remedy for every ailment, and necessary to health, on one hand - and his siblings swearing their ill heath is too far gone for them to visit, the latter being quite hilarious, this is already promising entertainment and more, right at the beginning. Later, it's the young Sir Edward Denham, handsome, and flattering in his attentions to the visitor Miss Charlotte Haywood, who is subject of the author's scrutiny. "Charlotte’s first glance told her that Sir Edward’s air was that of a lover. There could be no doubt of his devotion to Clara. How Clara received it was less obvious, but she was inclined to think not very favourably; for though sitting thus apart with him (which probably she might not have been able to prevent, her air was calm and grave." Austen is clear about her contempt for a modicum of behaviour slightly reminiscent of Mary Bennett from her most famous work, Pride And Prejudice. "He surprised her by quitting Clara immediately on their all joining and agreeing to walk, and by addressing his attentions entirely to herself. Stationing himself close by her, he seemed to mean to detach her as much as possible from the rest of the party and to give her the whole of his conversation. He began, in a tone of great taste and feeling, to talk of the sea and the sea shore; and ran with energy through all the usual phrases employed in praise of their sublimity and descriptive of the undescribable emotions they excite in the mind of sensibility. The terrific grandeur of the ocean in a storm, its glass surface in a calm, its gulls and its samphire and the deep fathoms of its abysses, its quick vicissitudes, its direful deceptions, its mariners tempting it in sunshine and overwhelmed by the sudden tempest—all were eagerly and fluently touched; rather commonplace perhaps, but doing very well from the lips of a handsome Sir Edward, and she could not but think him a man of feeling, till he began to stagger her by the number of his quotations and the bewilderment of some of his sentences. And she has Charlotte bequeathed with intelligence and common sense of Elizabeth Bennett, rather than the self absorption of Emma. "His choosing to walk with her, she had learnt to understand. It was done to pique Miss Brereton. She had read it, in an anxious glance or two on his side; but why he should talk so much nonsense, unless he could do no better, was unintelligible. He seemed very sentimental, very full of some feeling or other, and very much addicted to all the newest-fashioned hard words, had not a very clear brain, she presumed, and talked a good deal by rote. ... " Charlotte chooses to stay with Lady Denham on the Terrace, as asked by her, instead of going with others to library. "Nobody could live happier together than us—and he was a very honourable man, quite the gentleman of ancient family. And when he died, I gave Sir Edward his gold watch.” She said this with a look at her companion which implied its right to produce a great impression; and seeing no rapturous astonishment in Charlotte’s countenance, added quickly, “He did not bequeath it to his nephew, my dear. It was no bequest. It was not in the will. He only told me, and that but once, that he should wish his nephew to have his watch; but it need not have been binding if l had not chose it.” "“Very kind indeed! Very handsome!” said Charlotte, absolutely forced to affect admiration. "“Yes, my dear, and it is not the only kind thing I have done by him. I have been a very liberal friend to Sir Edward. And poor young man, he needs it bad enough. For though I am only the dowager, my dear, and he is the heir, things do not stand between us in the way they commonly do between those two parties. Not a shilling do I receive from the Denham estate. Sir Edward has no payments to make me. He doesn’t stand uppermost, believe me. It is I that help him.” "“Indeed! He is a very fine young man, particularly elegant in his address.” This was said chiefly for the sake of saying something, but Charlotte directly saw that it was laying her open to suspicion by Lady Denham’s giving a shrewd glance at her and replying, "“Yes, yes, he is very well to look at. And it is to be hoped that some lady of large fortune will think so, for Sir Edward must marry for money. He and I often talk that matter over. A handsome young fellow like him will go smirking and smiling about and paying girls compliments, but he knows he must marry for money. And Sir Edward is a very steady young man in the main and has got very good notions.”" ............ Austen writes candidly about - whether consciously aware, and deliberately writing, or simply taking them as facts of life - arranged marriage and caste systems of England in particular, Europe in general; things that since have been, falsely, identified exclusively with India, in line with Macaulay policy to break spirit of India. "“Sir Edward Denham,” said Charlotte, “with such personal advantages may be almost sure of getting a woman of fortune, if he chooses it.” "This glorious sentiment seemed quite to remove suspicion. “Aye my dear, that’s very sensibly said,” cried Lady Denham. “And if we could but get a young heiress to Sanditon! But heiresses are monstrous scarce! I do not think we have had an heiress here—or even a Co. since Sanditon has been a public place. Families come after families but, as far as I can learn, it is not one in a hundred of them that have any real property, landed or funded. An income perhaps, but no property. Clergymen maybe, or lawyers from town, or half-pay officers, or widows with only a jointure. And what good can such people do anybody? Except just as they take our empty houses and, between ourselves, I think they are great fools for not staying at home. Now if we could get a young heiress to be sent here for her health—and if she was ordered to drink asses’ milk I could supply her—and, as soon as she got well, have her fall in love with Sir Edward!”" ............ And again, as the two parties unite - "Sir Edward, approaching Charlotte, said, “You may perceive what has been our occupation. My sister wanted my counsel in the selection of some books. We have many leisure hours and read a great deal. I am no indiscriminate novel reader. The mere trash of the common circulating library I hold in the highest contempt. You will never hear me advocating those puerile emanations which detail nothing but discordant principles incapable of amalgamation, or those vapid tissues of ordinary occurrences from which no useful deductions can be drawn. In vain may we put them into a literary alembic; we distil nothing which can add to science. You understand me, I am sure?” "“I am not quite certain that I do. But if you will describe the sort of novels which you do approve, l dare say it will give me a clearer idea.” "“Most willingly, fair questioner. The novels which I approve are such as display human nature with grandeur; such as show her in the sublimities of intense feeling; such as exhibit the progress of strong passion from the first germ of incipient susceptibility to the utmost energies of reason half-dethroned; where we see the strong spark of woman’s captivations elicit such fire in the soul of man as leads him—though at the risk of some aberration from the strict line of primitive obligations—to hazard all, dare all, achieve all to obtain her. Such are the works which I peruse with delight and, I hope I may say, with amelioration. They hold forth the most splendid portraitures of high conceptions, unbounded views, illimitable ardour, indomitable decision. And even when the event is mainly anti-prosperous to the high-toned machinations of the prime character—the potent, pervading hero of the story—it leaves us full of generous emotions for him; our hearts are paralysed. It would be pseudo-philosophy to assert that we do not feel more enwrapped by the brilliancy of his career than by the tranquil and morbid virtues of any opposing character. Our approbation of the latter is but eleemosynary. These are the novels which enlarge the primitive capabilities to the heart; and it cannot impugn the sense or be any dereliction of the character of the most anti-puerile man, to be conversant with them.”" ............ "He read all the essays, letters, tours and criticisms of the day; and with the same ill-luck which made him derive only false principles from lessons of morality, and incentives to vice from the history of its overthrow, he gathered only hard words and involved sentences from the style of our most approved writers. Sir Edward’s great object in life was to be seductive. With such personal advantages as he knew himself to possess, and such talents as he did also give himself credit for, he regarded it as his duty. He felt that he was formed to be a dangerous man, quite in the line of the Lovelaces. The very name of Sir Edward, he thought, carried some degree of fascination with it. To be generally gallant and assiduous about the fair, to make fine speeches to every pretty girl, was but the inferior part of the character he had to play. Miss Heywood, or any other young woman with any pretensions to beauty, he was entitled (according to his own views of society) to approach with high compliment and rhapsody on the slightest acquaintance. But it was Clara alone on whom he had serious designs; it was Clara whom he meant to seduce—her seduction was quite determined on. Her situation in every way called for it. She was his rival in Lady Denham’s favour; she was young, lovely and dependent. He had very early seen the necessity of the case, and had now been long trying with cautious assiduity to make an impression on her heart and to undermine her principles. "Clara saw through him and had not the least intention of being seduced; but she bore with him patiently enough to confirm the sort of attachment which her personal charms had raised. A greater degree of discouragement indeed would not have affected Sir Edward. He was armed against the highest pitch of disdain or aversion. If she could not be won by affection, he must carry her off. He knew his business. Already had he had many musings on the subject. If he were constrained so to act, he must naturally wish to strike out something new, to exceed those who had gone before him; and he felt a strong curiosity to ascertain whether the neighbourhood of Timbuctu might not afford some solitary house adapted for Clara’s reception. But the expense, alas! of measures in that masterly style was ill-suited to his purse; and prudence obliged him to prefer the quietest sort of ruin and disgrace for the object of his affections to the more renowned." ............ Miss Diana Parker had written to describe inability of Parker siblings to travel, but they arrived. " ... You see how it was all managed. I had the pleasure of hearing soon afterwards by the same simple link of connection that Sanditon had been recommended by Mrs. Darling, and that the West Indians were very much disposed to go thither. This was the state of the case when I wrote to you. But two days ago—yes, the day before yesterday—I heard again from Fanny Noyce, saying that she had heard from Miss Capper, who by a letter from Mrs. Darling understood that Mrs. Griffiths had expressed herself in a letter to Mrs. Darling more doubtingly on the subject of Sanditon. Am I clear? I would be anything rather than not clear.” "“Oh, perfectly, perfectly. Well? “ "“The reason of this hesitation was her having no connections in the place, and no means of ascertaining that she should have good accommodations on arriving there; and she was particularly careful and scrupulous on all those matters more on account of a certain Miss Lambe, a young lady—probably a niece—under her care than on her own account or her daughters’. Miss Lambe has an immense fortune—richer than all the rest—and very delicate health. One sees clearly enough by all this the sort of woman Mrs. Griffiths must be: as helpless and indolent as wealth and a hot climate are apt to make us. But we are not born to equal energy. What was to be done? I had a few moments’ indecision, whether to offer to write to you or to Mrs. Whitby to secure them a house; but neither pleased me. I hate to employ others when I am equal to act myself; and my conscience told me that this was an occasion which called for me. Here was a family of helpless invalids whom I might essentially serve. I sounded Susan. The same thought had occurred to her. Arthur made no difficulties. Our plan was arranged immediately, we were off yesterday morning at six, left Chichester at the same hour today—and here we are.”" " ... I am very sure that the largest house at Sanditon cannot be too large. They are more likely to want a second. I shall take only one, however, and that but for a week certain. Miss Heywood, I astonish you. You hardly know what to make of me. I see by your looks that you are not used to such quick measures.” "The words “unaccountable officiousness!” “activity run mad!” had just passed through Charlotte’s mind, but a civil answer was easy. “I dare say I do look surprised,” said she, “because these are very great exertions, and I know what invalids both you and your sister are.” "“Invalids indeed. I trust there are not three people in England who have so sad a right to that appellation! But my dear Miss Heywood, we are sent into this world to be as extensively useful as possible, and where some degree of strength of mind is given, it is not a feeble body which will excuse us—or incline us to excuse ourselves. ... " " ... Lady Denham had other motives for calling on Mrs. Griffiths besides attention to the Parkers. In Miss Lambe, here was the very young lady, sickly and rich, whom she had been asking for; and she made the acquaintance for Sir Edward’s sake and the sake of her milch asses. ... " "The corner house of the Terrace was the one in which Miss Diana Parker had the pleasure of settling her new friends; and considering that it commanded in front the favourite lounge of all the visitors at Sanditon, and on one side whatever might be going on at the hotel, there could not have been a more favourable spot for the seclusion of the Miss Beauforts. And accordingly, long before they had suited themselves with an instrument or with drawing paper, they had, by the frequency of their appearance at the low windows upstairs in order to close the blinds, or open the blinds, to arrange a flower pot on the balcony, or look at nothing through a telescope, attracted many an eye upwards and made many a gazer gaze again. ....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Quinn Smells Books

    This is one of my favourite juveniliae! JA's juvenilia has two lovely features: a) we get to see Jane's fascinating journey and evolution as a writer; and b) in her juvenilia, Jane's sharp satire is in much truer form, as she was writing only for her family and her own amusement, and didn't have to worry about getting published or public ire. A delightful read! This is one of my favourite juveniliae! JA's juvenilia has two lovely features: a) we get to see Jane's fascinating journey and evolution as a writer; and b) in her juvenilia, Jane's sharp satire is in much truer form, as she was writing only for her family and her own amusement, and didn't have to worry about getting published or public ire. A delightful read!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ragna

    I loved reading Austen's early and unfinished works. It is such a shame she passed away so young. So much talent lost too soon. Reading her early works show an incredible prodigy not yet come into her own. I wonder if her family realized how talented she was at that young age. I loved reading Austen's early and unfinished works. It is such a shame she passed away so young. So much talent lost too soon. Reading her early works show an incredible prodigy not yet come into her own. I wonder if her family realized how talented she was at that young age.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Five stars - because it's jane Austen! Five stars - because it's jane Austen!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Karen Sofarin

    Brilliant as is everything by Austen. Funny and enchanting. I start by reading the juvenilia, and then Sanditon, The Watsons and Lady Susan. I like her writing more each time I read it. This was just the second time for reading this volume.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  8. 5 out of 5

    Janna

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sydney

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mia Green

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katie Marshall

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marie

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alexis Roumanis

  16. 4 out of 5

    Helena Gravåhs

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Thornfield

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mariana

  19. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  20. 4 out of 5

    JC

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Sullivan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  24. 4 out of 5

    Krite2002

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shauna

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ana Velazquez

  27. 4 out of 5

    Malena Roth

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sue Griffing

  29. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

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