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The Long Run

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Few of the telepaths survived the massacre by the United Nations Peaceforce. Seven years later, the last telepaths, Denice and Trent, are marked by the Peaceforce, and will die unless Trent can carry out his plan to avenge the deaths of his friends.


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Few of the telepaths survived the massacre by the United Nations Peaceforce. Seven years later, the last telepaths, Denice and Trent, are marked by the Peaceforce, and will die unless Trent can carry out his plan to avenge the deaths of his friends.

30 review for The Long Run

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ric

    Even on well panned riverbeds, one can still find gold. And this is just what I found, via the Goodreads discussion groups, a golden book from the 80s. The Long Run is the 2nd book of the Continuing Time series by Daniel Keys Moran. It's primarily the story of Trent Castanaveras, 2nd generation genetically engineered human, who unlike Carl of the 1st book (Emerald Eyes, an amazing book in its own right) is not a telepath but instead is physically enhanced. Trent is a thief and a (cyber-)Player w Even on well panned riverbeds, one can still find gold. And this is just what I found, via the Goodreads discussion groups, a golden book from the 80s. The Long Run is the 2nd book of the Continuing Time series by Daniel Keys Moran. It's primarily the story of Trent Castanaveras, 2nd generation genetically engineered human, who unlike Carl of the 1st book (Emerald Eyes, an amazing book in its own right) is not a telepath but instead is physically enhanced. Trent is a thief and a (cyber-)Player who is moved to payback the atrocities of the world-dominating military, the Peacekeeper Force, in particular, of the cyborg Vance Mohammed. The book covers the pursuit of Trent by Vance from subjugated earth to the Lagrangian stations and onto the moon. That pursuit in and of itself is engaging, although there are instances of fortunate coincidences to help Trent along. What is memorable is the inventive use of the back story and its science fictional elements that avoid the sensation of "plucking things out of thin air" that can be found in similar chase stories. Along the way, Moran presents a view of both the physical and cyber worlds of his future that is amazingly contemporary and, except for one aspect noted below, does not feel dated at all.Moran's prose has a schizo tendency to jump about in short bursts, particularly during action sequences, from one point of view or point in time to another. This may be a jarring style that takes time to get used to. Since I made through the first book, I was used to this by this second book. In fact, I think Moran is more linear in his approach here. Anyway, I view this technique as supplemntal to the "coolness" factor of the story-telling reminiscent of Neal Asher's Gridlinked or William Gibson's Sprawl series.Trent is an interesting character. The comparison to Case of Neuromancer comes up immediately because of the cyber skills, but ultimately Case is a victim of circumstances outside his control while Trent makes his own destiny. Another comparison is with Wade of Ready Player One, this time with the game Player dimension, and I think, with their relative youthfulness. Both reluctantly find themselves "King of the Hill" and give the powers-that-be a kick in the b. Trent survives the reading process better because of his intransigent nature that seems to say, "you thought you knew me, but you actually don't" weeks after the final page.For all the imaginative extrapolation of Moran's world-building, especially in relation to the development of the worldwide net and cyber culture, he did miss out on Moore's Law. While the book considers 700 TB of memory as a pinnacle of technical achievement, other authors have projected singularity based on the progressing speeds of digital computation. But this minor issue does not detract from the overall quality of the book. Take this as just a wise-ass comment from a lowly reviewer. Regardless, Moran has made a fan out of me, and I am adding him to my list of must-read authors.I am looking forward to reading the next two books in the series. For fans of the books mentioned above, this one is highly recommended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Holman

    A friend of mine recommended this book to me and told me there's no need to read #1 or #3 of the trilogy because it stands on its own and it's the best of the trilogy. It does stand on its own. And it's a great book. I love Trent - no, I want to be Trent. Trent the Thief, Trent the Uncatchable. He's funny and sarcastic and brilliant and has morals and this is a great book. It's very sci-fi however, I'm not a huge sci-fi book fan and I really enjoyed this book. A friend of mine recommended this book to me and told me there's no need to read #1 or #3 of the trilogy because it stands on its own and it's the best of the trilogy. It does stand on its own. And it's a great book. I love Trent - no, I want to be Trent. Trent the Thief, Trent the Uncatchable. He's funny and sarcastic and brilliant and has morals and this is a great book. It's very sci-fi however, I'm not a huge sci-fi book fan and I really enjoyed this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    My absolute favorite book ever. I have read this at least a dozen times since I bought it in high school. That reminds me . . . it's been a while. My absolute favorite book ever. I have read this at least a dozen times since I bought it in high school. That reminds me . . . it's been a while.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

    So, point of honesty: this was my favorite book when I was 14. And it was 1990. And the internet was still shuffling towards "a good idea." It's not the best prose in the world. It's not the tightest story ever written. It's not the best cyber-punk heist novel of all time. But it's damn good, and it tries hard, and it still kicks ass more than twenty years later. I've had three paperback copies. I know Moran had some really high quality hard-back versions printed, but I wasn't in time to pick one o So, point of honesty: this was my favorite book when I was 14. And it was 1990. And the internet was still shuffling towards "a good idea." It's not the best prose in the world. It's not the tightest story ever written. It's not the best cyber-punk heist novel of all time. But it's damn good, and it tries hard, and it still kicks ass more than twenty years later. I've had three paperback copies. I know Moran had some really high quality hard-back versions printed, but I wasn't in time to pick one of those up. So dog-eared and aging paperbacks were all I had until I got the ebook a few months ago. I've re-read the whole series, and this one still stands out. The book is just a romp. It's a heist and a chase scene and a set-up, and it's all of those at the same time running flat out non-stop no-holds-bared from New York to the Moon. You might not love it, I really don't know what other combination of eclectic passions would lead someone to love this book...but for me it's damn near perfect even decades after I first read it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lurple

    Daniel Keys Moran deserves more attention from sci-fi fans. My copies of his books are dog-eared and beat up, and this one is missing the cover, but I treasure them still. Moran has created an interesting sci-fi universe peopled with interesting characters. I encourage readers to check out his A Tale of the Continuing Time novels as well as his standalone work.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Collins

    Big Peter Abe with a surprising recommendation - forgotten Sci Fi from the late 80s, that reads with a contemporary feel - Brought me back to Red Mars with hints of the Bourne Identity.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Peter Tillman

    This one showed up in reliable (for me) reviewer Russ Allebery's list of his highest-rated SF/F books. Here's his review, https://www.eyrie.org/~eagle/reviews/... And an excerpt: He rates it as 9/10. " I think my favorite part of the book is the self-assured, calm, occasionally sardonic attitude of the lead character, a memorable hero who I greatly enjoyed spending time with. He manages to come up with all of those quips that one wishes one could think of in the heat of the moment. Having a lead c This one showed up in reliable (for me) reviewer Russ Allebery's list of his highest-rated SF/F books. Here's his review, https://www.eyrie.org/~eagle/reviews/... And an excerpt: He rates it as 9/10. " I think my favorite part of the book is the self-assured, calm, occasionally sardonic attitude of the lead character, a memorable hero who I greatly enjoyed spending time with. He manages to come up with all of those quips that one wishes one could think of in the heat of the moment. Having a lead character who doesn't believe in killing is a nice touch and adds a tiny bit of philosophy to the story — not a lot, as this isn't a particularly philosophical book, but enough to add more depth to his character. Obviously a lot of thought has gone into the world, and I loved the blending of the story with quotes from various religious writings, analyses, and songs, sometimes dated far after the events of the story. Not only does this add to the ambiance, but it gives the story a certain mythic feel and depth that's quite engrossing. "

  8. 5 out of 5

    Harold Ogle

    Recommendation: This is a fantastic cyberpunk novel that has aged more gracefully than most of its contemporaries. Review: Trent Castanaveras in a genetically engineered clone. A minor character from the first book in the series (Emerald Eyes), Trent is one of only four "genies" to survive those events to this book. Stranded and orphaned when he was eleven, not knowing that anyone else he knew survived, Trent has spent the last seven years scrambling in a post-apocalyptic no man's land, surviving Recommendation: This is a fantastic cyberpunk novel that has aged more gracefully than most of its contemporaries. Review: Trent Castanaveras in a genetically engineered clone. A minor character from the first book in the series (Emerald Eyes), Trent is one of only four "genies" to survive those events to this book. Stranded and orphaned when he was eleven, not knowing that anyone else he knew survived, Trent has spent the last seven years scrambling in a post-apocalyptic no man's land, surviving on his considerable wits and skills. The process of keeping alive through the brutality and escaping into the Patrol Sectors (areas of Occupied America that are actually policed by the United Nations government - "the Unification") has impressed upon him a couple of rules that govern all aspects of how he lives his life: "Killing is wrong," and "You can run away from any problem." He has become a Player - a person who dances in the web, hacking his own software tools and commandeering computing resources on the fly. He uses these skills to great effect in a world that has become dominated by and dependent upon network computing, both providing security to companies as well as stealing information and/or boosting assets from the wealthy. As the book begins, he's doing well for himself as well as for the gang of misfits that he helped escape the Fringe with him. But a mysterious stranger tips him off to a sting operation on the same day that he runs into one of the other Castanaveras survivors, which sets back in motion the long series of events that started with the Time Wars (as referenced in each of the books in the series). (view spoiler)[Trent is being hunted by Emile Garon, a cyborg who became obsessed with Trent years earlier. After Trent unexpectedly reunites with his childhood friend Denice - one of only two genie telepaths to have survived the first book - Trent is captured by Emile. Denice uses her powers to bust him out of prison, which draws a big target on her. Trent retrieves his Image software, Johnny Johnny, but Emile finds him there, and a long chase ensues that ends with Emile's accidental death. Trent decides that he must draw the PKF attention away from Denice to protect her, so he runs off of Earth aboard a spaceship bound for Luna. But the Commander of all the PKF Elite cyborgs - Mohammed Vance, who was directly responsible for killing all of Trent's family in Emerald Eyes - orders the ship to stop at the space station at L-5. Trent fast talks his way off of the ship and onto the station, then improvises an escape by sabotaging the station's weapons and hijacking a Space Force yacht. Mohammed fires the station's weapons at him even though Trent warned him, which destroys a large part of the space station but also cripples Trent's stolen ship. Trent crashes on the moon and is saved by a fugitive SpeedFreak who calls himself Nathan Dark Clouds. Nathan nurses Trent back to health, and Trent hatches an ambitious plan, drawing on Nathan's social capital and his own considerable financial resources. He works with a team of Free Luna ideologs. Trent surgically alters every aspect of his appearance, changing from a handsome, white, blond kid to an older hispanic brunette man (duplicating the appearance of a PKF DataWatch employee named "Benny"), and installs a networked nerve net in his brain. The group ambushes a lunar crawler, knocks out all the crew (including Benny), swaps out all their unconscious bodies with corpses, then sabotages the crawler to look like there was a terrorist attack. "Benny" is rescued by the PKF and brought to the Lunar DataWatch HQ. There he is interviewed by a suspicious Mohammed Vance, who becomes convinced that Benny is actually Trent. He locks Trent in the room, but Trent has smuggled in some tools. He escapes the room and while everyone is racing him to the exits, he actually goes deeper into the base and attacks the PKF security system - the Lunar Information Network Key (LINK) - that gatekeeps all network traffic on the moon. Trent brings down LINK and uses his network permissions to make things tough for Vance to get to him. Trent flees onto the surface of the moon and jumps into the first magnetic ring of a mass driver to escape Vance. He is picked up from Lunar orbit by a spaceship, and they flee the PKF pursuit ships as the book ends. (hide spoiler)] Critique: I've read The Long Run (and Daniel Keys Moran's several other books) many times over the years, first discovering them when I was the same age as Trent (the protagonist) in this novel: I picked up the book on a whim, attracted by the cover art, which is a striking image of a scene from the book: Trent, fleeing the Peaceforcers in a Chandler Metalsmith Mark II hovercar. The car is purple for some reason, and Trent has dark hair, which has always bothered me: why do books get published with cover illustrations that don't depict the characters correctly? It's a minor gripe that bothers me primarily because it's one of the few sour notes in an otherwise excellent novel. Let me get the rest of the bad stuff out of the way: as with a lot of science fiction novels, the sexuality in The Long Run is a little creepy. It's not as bad as Frankowski's "Cross-Time Engineer" series, but it's in the same ballpark. Like almost all of the Castanaveras genies, Trent is a clone of Carl. Carl married a different clone, Jany, and together they got pregnant and the twins Denice and David Castanaveras were born naturally two years after Trent was born artificially. So the relationships are weird; being clones, everybody is as close to genetically identical as they could manage. Trent is thus either an uncle or a brother to Denice, and yet they're lovers. Is that better, worse, or just as bad as the fact that when they hook up, Trent is eighteen and Denice is a 16-year-old minor? Trent is a horn dog, though: over the course of the novel he also sleeps with at least two other women (Callia and the surgeon). Thankfully Moran doesn't go into any lurid details; in fact he glosses over this so deftly that you might be able to read the book and not really think about it. While it is far and away the most prescient book from the 80s about how the network has come to dominate our lives, The Long Run still ends up seeming a bit dated in some respects. The chief form of this is in little technology details. The Long Run was published in 1989, when Moran was 26. Elsewhere, he has written about how he first wrote the story when he was 18, which would have been 1981. He then went on to write his other novels (the excellent The Armageddon Blues and the first installment of the Continuing Time series, Emerald Eyes) as a warm-up/proof-of-concept; getting him ready to write The Long Run in a way that would do it justice. So he was creating his concept of the web - the Crystal Wind - in the mid-80s, extrapolating from what was available then. He predicts a lot of stuff that didn't exist then but is so commonplace now it's hard to remember a time without them: the ubiquity of computing, driverless cars, handheld computers (smart phones), fiber optic networking, online news, digital music, remote study/online education, even the very concept that everyone would rely on online sources for their information. It's kind of amazing how much he gets right, particularly when you compare his writing to any other near-future SF from the same time period: other writers tend to be howlingly off the mark with their versions of "future" computing technology. But within all that creativity there are still limitations. The primary form of networking back then was through terminal programs accessing remote systems; the most common form of this was bulletin board systems. So even though what he's describing could easily be thought of as "web sites," he calls them "boards" consistently. HTML was barely in use in 1989 (certainly not in any sort of globally-networked way), let alone the graphical internet that we enjoy today: Netscape's Mosaic browser wasn't to come out for another 5 years. There's a terrible Keanu Reeves film called "Johnny Mnemonic," which is itself an adaptation of another cyberpunk story from 1981. In that film, there is a point where Keanu boasts that his head contains "ten gigabytes of storage," which had my friends and I howling with derisive laughter in the theater. We laughed because even when that film came out in 1995, 10GB was pretty attainable, and seemed far too modest a volume of memory to classify as even near future science fiction. A good trajectory to imagine for SF authors: what is an impressive amount of memory will at least increase another power of 1024 every decade. So in 1980, 1 kilobyte (1024 bytes) was an extravagant amount of random access memory (RAM). Ten years later, in 1990, 1 megabyte (MB) RAM was impressive. In 2000, 1 gigabyte (GB). In 2010, 1 terabyte (TB). In 2020, 1 petabyte (PB) of RAM is impressive. By 2030, 1 exabyte (EB) will be impressive, in 2040 1 zettabyte (ZB), and in 2050, 1 yottabyte (YB). Computer scientists have not yet agreed on a name for the 1024^9 or 1024^10 amounts of RAM, as that amount is theoretical at this point. Daniel Keys Moran could have been the one to name these amounts, because The Long Run takes place in 2069, when an impressive amount of RAM will be that 1024^10 number. He certainly couldn't have done worse than the names that have been proposed, as they are pretty ridiculous. But he didn't. When he wrote this novel, "terabyte" was the largest unit of memory that had been named, so in coming up for the names for those large numbers, he'd also have had to come up with names for 1PB on up. So we read about him stealing a paltry amount of RAM in the book (125 TB). This isn't as ridiculous or as jarring as "Johnny Mnemonic," but it's fundamentally the same problem...and it does get more jarring every ten years. There's a relatively minor annoyance that The Long Run has in common with many other science fiction books. No, for once it's not the imagined wonders of zero-gravity sex. This time, it's the idea that the shadows on the moon are completely black, and that the dark side of the moon is really dark. It's an idea that crops up again and again in science fiction, and it's totally false. Shadows on the moon look sharp and black. They are sharp because there is effectively no atmospheric diffusion of light to soften the edges of a shadow. But the shadows are only black by contrast to the areas that are illuminated by sunlight. Just as there is no atmosphere to diffuse light, there is no air, no water vapor, no fog, and no cloud cover to dim the light of a billion stars which shine down ceaselessly on all surfaces of the moon. The shadows on the moon (including the dark side) are lit brighter than the brightest starry night on Earth. Any sighted person in a suit would be able to see and easily navigate anywhere in shadow on the moon. Could you still hide in shadows on the moon? Sure, as long as you were hiding from people who were in the sunlit areas: to them, shadows would seem to be pits of darkness. But if you were in the shadows looking at other people in the shadows - for instance, if you were on the "dark side" of the moon - you'd be able to see them and they'd be able to see you just fine. But those are the exceptions that keep The Long Run from seeming too perfect; otherwise, the book is a wonderful ride. Moran has built an engaging world that leans towards realism rather than fantasy; the spaceships use realistic physics, and, unlike the majority of cyberpunk authors, Moran based his computing sequences on his actual career experience with programming and software development. So there is a detailed verisimilitude to the setting of the Continuing Time. Trent is a charismatic trickster character (Trent even references the classic Bugs Bunny cartoon "Rabbit Seasoning" in the text), and the narrative follows him as he largely improvises a brilliant heist. It's one awesome sequence after another, with the stakes getting ever higher and higher, strung in a beautiful progression like a string of Christmas lights. This is the story that Moran came up with early, and the refinement of working and reworking it for eight years really shows. The book is funny, it's exciting, and it's filled with a punk attitude that almost certainly informed later works - most obviously Stephenson's Snow Crash. The characters are all cool archetypes with lots of attitude, rather than detailed people with nuanced, loaded dialogue with lots of subtext. The Long Run is cyberpunk at its most essential: it is about people using computers and cybernetics (that's the "cyber") to subvert an oppressive authority (and that's the "punk"). It's all the more endearing because the character of Trent is unusual in the genre for being committed to not killing anyone. There's plenty of violence in the story, but it's nearly always the authorities causing damage and mayhem in the attempt to avoid looking stupid or silly. Trent is a trickster, as I said, not a vengeful warrior. So the main delight is in seeing how he outwits his opponents, who are stronger, bigger, faster, and more powerful than he is.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Will Sargent

    6/10 I thought this was the same Daniel Keys who did the staggeringly readable Flowers for Algernon (Masterworks series). I wonder if the publisher did a Kate Mosse, to copy the name and get it slipped on bookshelves next to the good stuff, to make you think it was actually somthing or someone else. Either way this was above average fare, coming across as a Neuromancer lite with fun references to Heinlein, Vance and other contemporaries, and I enjoyed yet another trip to the moon. The book fell t 6/10 I thought this was the same Daniel Keys who did the staggeringly readable Flowers for Algernon (Masterworks series). I wonder if the publisher did a Kate Mosse, to copy the name and get it slipped on bookshelves next to the good stuff, to make you think it was actually somthing or someone else. Either way this was above average fare, coming across as a Neuromancer lite with fun references to Heinlein, Vance and other contemporaries, and I enjoyed yet another trip to the moon. The book fell to bits while reading as it was part of a box of musty '80s sci fi scooped up from a Maryport charity shop. The box should have been labelled 'Warning!: average sci-fi in this box'

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brent Winslow

    The second book in the continuing time series is a fast paced, fun read, focusing on the exploits of Trent the Thief - his escape from Earth, and subsequent revenge on the UN peacekeepers, a group that acts more like the SS than police.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Brylski

    Creative, smart I liked this book, it made me smile - but, are all women such a soft touch? Of course, read book 1 in the series first.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Technomonk

    fun. light.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Subject BGD

    Awesome sequel. Loved reading about Trent the Uncatchable, can't wait for the next. Awesome sequel. Loved reading about Trent the Uncatchable, can't wait for the next.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    My rating is based upon having read this book for the first time (on or about) the year 1989. I remember eagerly turning pages as Trent escaped one hair-raising action sequence before entering another. This book was for me like crack is to a crack addict. I am tempted, oh so tempted, to read it again. UPDATE: Having just completed a re-read, I find that my previously high regard for this book has diminished over the last 20 odd years. I no longer consider this book to be one of my "all time favori My rating is based upon having read this book for the first time (on or about) the year 1989. I remember eagerly turning pages as Trent escaped one hair-raising action sequence before entering another. This book was for me like crack is to a crack addict. I am tempted, oh so tempted, to read it again. UPDATE: Having just completed a re-read, I find that my previously high regard for this book has diminished over the last 20 odd years. I no longer consider this book to be one of my "all time favorites". The "Long run is still a good book, IMO, but no longer a "GREAT" book. The book is unchanged since my first reading, so the reason for my re-evaluation is a change in the reader...yours truly. I am a different person than I was in 1989. A lot of books have been read since 1989. The "Long Run" has suffered in comparison. IMO, in the year of 2013, the "Long Run" deserves 3 stars. SPOILER ALERT****** For certain types of adventure literature to be enjoyable (for me), the contests between protagonist(s) and antagonist(s) need to provide a certain amount of tension. The bad guy needs to come close to killing/defeating the good guy. There needs to be a real question concerning the outcome. If your protagonist is freakishly smart and the antagonists are bureaucratic simpletons, there will not be any doubt as to the outcome. No doubt, no tension. Trent the Uncatchable is this story's protagonist and resident super genius. The PKF (Peace Keeping Force) are the story's simpleton antagonists. Time and time again, Trent effortlessly eludes or evades or outthinks these petty bureaucrats who are collectively the baddest of the bad in our Solar System. Yawn…after a while, I stopped buying the BS that Trent was in any danger of getting caught or killed. Once that happened, I lost interest and finishing the book began to feel like a chore. It is a shame really, because I had such fond memories.. END SPOILER******* How in the world did I ever consider this book to be among my “all time favorites”? Maybe I am too jaded to enjoy a story of this type any longer?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Scribal

    I'm pleased to discover Moran however belatedly. I just read Emerald Eyes, The Long Run and the Last Dancer in that order. The Long Run is the tightest and most satisfying of the three. Comments have been made about it as a heist story and and a long chase--yes that's the form of the book but that's not why it's good. There are lots of tightly written genre novels with similar forms and often I don't like them enough to finish or forget them after I do. The Long Run is good because Moran can wri I'm pleased to discover Moran however belatedly. I just read Emerald Eyes, The Long Run and the Last Dancer in that order. The Long Run is the tightest and most satisfying of the three. Comments have been made about it as a heist story and and a long chase--yes that's the form of the book but that's not why it's good. There are lots of tightly written genre novels with similar forms and often I don't like them enough to finish or forget them after I do. The Long Run is good because Moran can write plot, character and idea all at once! There's satisfaction to be had in following the shape of his plot. Trent is an interesting (if slightly inhuman) protagonist that's easy to invest in. And Moran does a very interesting thing with ideas--he keeps the reader unsettled about where he and the characters stand on a lot of issues. The world he creates seems very black and white sometimes, but it always shifts to grey. This is more evident if more of the Continuing Time series is read. Emerald Eyes and especially Last Dancer are less balanced--Moran doesn't always handle the character shifts well--I didn't invest in other characters as much as Trent and unless the series is going to be continued for a long time (and I hope it is), there was way too much detailed back story that was ultimately left hanging.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Stunning. A virtuoso performance. Mindblowing action. Great characters. If you haven't found a good book to read, pick this one up. A little background first. Trent, the main character, is a webplayer and a thief. He is also a genetic mutant. The United Nations is controlled by the Peacekeepers who are headquartered in France. The Leadership of the Peacekeepers, the Peacekeeper Elite are cyborgs. In a previous novel the Peacekeepers dropped a nuclear bomb on New York City to destroy an enclave of Stunning. A virtuoso performance. Mindblowing action. Great characters. If you haven't found a good book to read, pick this one up. A little background first. Trent, the main character, is a webplayer and a thief. He is also a genetic mutant. The United Nations is controlled by the Peacekeepers who are headquartered in France. The Leadership of the Peacekeepers, the Peacekeeper Elite are cyborgs. In a previous novel the Peacekeepers dropped a nuclear bomb on New York City to destroy an enclave of telepaths because they threatened the Peacekeeper's rule. Most of Trent's family, who were there were killed, but Trent was not there because even though he was a genetic mutant, he was not a telepath. Now several years later, using his talent as a webplayer and his gifts as a thief, he and his crew have escaped out of the wild areas to approach actual society, but the Peacekeeper's have not forgotten that he is out there and they still seek him. They pick him up in a set up and lock him away in jail, but when his friends break him out, Trent has no choice but to run away. This book follows Trent's run from the Peacekeeper Elite that seek him from New York City, to a starship in space to the Moon and beyond. This is one of my all time favorite books.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Friesen

    The 2nd book in Moran's Continuing Times series (of which four have now been written), this one chronicles the adventures of Trent Castanaveras. Genengineered by a geneticist, Trent should have been a telepath like the rest of his extended family. However, lacking the three genes of telepaths, he instead goes on to become one of the planet's best Players (hacker) in the InfoNet (21st century Internet) and premiere thieves years after his telepathic cousins are slaughtered by a world government te The 2nd book in Moran's Continuing Times series (of which four have now been written), this one chronicles the adventures of Trent Castanaveras. Genengineered by a geneticist, Trent should have been a telepath like the rest of his extended family. However, lacking the three genes of telepaths, he instead goes on to become one of the planet's best Players (hacker) in the InfoNet (21st century Internet) and premiere thieves years after his telepathic cousins are slaughtered by a world government terrified of their power (this all takes place in the first novel, Emerald Eyes). He is apprehended by the UN PeaceKeeping Force and charged with crimes against humanity. His escape from a high security prison with one of the last surviving telepaths and fellow thieves is an epic chase, culminating in a run to the lunar colonies on the Moon. Along the way, he makes more than his fair share of friends and enemies. The characters are interesting, the humour sarcastic and biting, and the words practically drop from the page. I've read the book probably twenty times and still read it once a year for the pure adventure of it. Everyone I've loaned my copy to has loved the book. Frankly, I'm surprised that this cyberpunk novel has been overlooked for so long.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    3.5 stars. I picked this up because of a secondhand recommendation and didn't learn anything about it before starting. Two paragraphs in, I knew it was one of those books from the 80s where the UN invades and nukes the US (it was always the USSR or UN) and some people have psychic powers. The main character is handsome, witty, athletic, total nerd wish-fulfillment. And while he has one true love, he won't hesitate to bang his way out of a situation. I wasn't wrong about any of those, but the boo 3.5 stars. I picked this up because of a secondhand recommendation and didn't learn anything about it before starting. Two paragraphs in, I knew it was one of those books from the 80s where the UN invades and nukes the US (it was always the USSR or UN) and some people have psychic powers. The main character is handsome, witty, athletic, total nerd wish-fulfillment. And while he has one true love, he won't hesitate to bang his way out of a situation. I wasn't wrong about any of those, but the book was better written than I expected. Not literature, but not bad either. By the end, I was happily surprised at how well Moran had subverted my dime store expectations - with a great take on hacking and AI and some unexpected social commentary.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Picked this off the "to be read" pile as it was the highest rated of my unread books on Goodreads (over 4.7 average rating!). I've read both The Last Dancer and Emerald Eyes so had some curiosity about the legendary Trent. On the whole it’s a reasonable action adventure come "heist" tale. The prose style, choice of view point and pseudo-historic epigrams conspire to sap a fair bit of the tension about how the job is going to go that a "heist" yarn could have. (The fact that I’ve read the books out Picked this off the "to be read" pile as it was the highest rated of my unread books on Goodreads (over 4.7 average rating!). I've read both The Last Dancer and Emerald Eyes so had some curiosity about the legendary Trent. On the whole it’s a reasonable action adventure come "heist" tale. The prose style, choice of view point and pseudo-historic epigrams conspire to sap a fair bit of the tension about how the job is going to go that a "heist" yarn could have. (The fact that I’ve read the books out of order probably didn't help either).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dave Bell

    Big fan of Daniel Keys Moran. Story goes that he wrote 33 volumes of a sci-if epic when he was in high school. Not sure how true it is but I dig his style - future world (2060's) after a UN war to unify all countries, goes back and forth between "cyber-punk" themes of hackers and AI's running amok, cyborgs built in zero-gravity orbiting space stations, a solar system wide human culture, genetically engineered telepath protagonists (which were spawned by time-travelling humans from the future inv Big fan of Daniel Keys Moran. Story goes that he wrote 33 volumes of a sci-if epic when he was in high school. Not sure how true it is but I dig his style - future world (2060's) after a UN war to unify all countries, goes back and forth between "cyber-punk" themes of hackers and AI's running amok, cyborgs built in zero-gravity orbiting space stations, a solar system wide human culture, genetically engineered telepath protagonists (which were spawned by time-travelling humans from the future involved in their own internecine warfare). I dig it much - no holds barred sci-fi.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Greg O'Byrne

    6 Stars! 7 even! This book is a cross between The Lies of Lock Lamora, the movie Oceans 11, Neuromancer and the Moon is a Harsh Mistress. The first third is good, the second third is better and the final third of the book is Epic. Trent the Uncatchable is one of the best characters in Science Fiction. If you are a Science Fiction fan and you have not read this book (and the rest of the continuing time series) then there is a hole in your library. Fill that hole today!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael Bourgon

    "The Crystal Wind is the Storm, and the Storm is Data, and the Data is Life." The whole book is basically one giant chase scene, from downtown New York City to orbit, to the Moon. All the while our hero, Trent The Thief (mind the capitals) is busy running from the Peace Keeping Force, and determined to steal things. Great scenes and quotes abound. "The Crystal Wind is the Storm, and the Storm is Data, and the Data is Life." The whole book is basically one giant chase scene, from downtown New York City to orbit, to the Moon. All the while our hero, Trent The Thief (mind the capitals) is busy running from the Peace Keeping Force, and determined to steal things. Great scenes and quotes abound.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ryan McCormack

    A roller coaster, fun read compared to the first book in this series. Trent is a great character; you almost can't help rooting for him. Keys-Moran took a more straightforward approach with this book as well, which I appreciated. Fewer interludes from future oddities. Anyway, well worth the read, and I'd almost say you could skip the first and still enjoy this one. A roller coaster, fun read compared to the first book in this series. Trent is a great character; you almost can't help rooting for him. Keys-Moran took a more straightforward approach with this book as well, which I appreciated. Fewer interludes from future oddities. Anyway, well worth the read, and I'd almost say you could skip the first and still enjoy this one.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    One of my favorite books. Underdog style hero mixed with (at the time of writing) plausible future happenings. The author is particularly good at making assumed background knowledge seem real. Still a good read ~20 years later. Of course, some of that may be nostalgia.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    If you can find a copy of this book -often in a used bookshop - by all means pick it up and read it right away. I've read it at least four times and it continues to hold my interest if I pick it up again. There's a point to the story, but mostly its narrative, narrative, narrative. If you can find a copy of this book -often in a used bookshop - by all means pick it up and read it right away. I've read it at least four times and it continues to hold my interest if I pick it up again. There's a point to the story, but mostly its narrative, narrative, narrative.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dcchivers

    Was reluctant to read this book because I struggled thru Green Eyes, but I'm glad I did. I enjoyed the story, and enjoyed the references back to Green Eyes, refreshing my memory. The writing style is choppy for me, but I had a much easier time following along with this book. Was reluctant to read this book because I struggled thru Green Eyes, but I'm glad I did. I enjoyed the story, and enjoyed the references back to Green Eyes, refreshing my memory. The writing style is choppy for me, but I had a much easier time following along with this book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    Probably the most fun volume of the continuing time series so far, mainly because it leaves the aliens out of things, mostly, and focuses on Trent the Uncatchable, who's always a lot of fun. Keys Moran is clearly more comfortable with this aspect of his mythos. Probably the most fun volume of the continuing time series so far, mainly because it leaves the aliens out of things, mostly, and focuses on Trent the Uncatchable, who's always a lot of fun. Keys Moran is clearly more comfortable with this aspect of his mythos.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amy Nicolai

    The series gets better! The pacing is insistent, the characters becoming more and more real. Definitely worth moving on to the next book. Still a bit too much info-dumping but forgivable. Trent remind me a bit of Ender.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brianna

    This was such a fun read! A lot different from Emerald Eyes, this story focuses on the adventures of Trent the Uncatchable as he tries to escapes the peaceforcers that still hunt the Castanaveras genies. I cannot express how badly I want these novels to be on audiobook.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    I'm halfway through, writing is good and consistent with the first one, but I am not really interested in Trent and the other genies like I was about Carl, I was just attached to him and there is nothing wrong with the book, but I am not finishing it I'm halfway through, writing is good and consistent with the first one, but I am not really interested in Trent and the other genies like I was about Carl, I was just attached to him and there is nothing wrong with the book, but I am not finishing it

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