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Forbidden Books Of The Original New Testament: By William Wake : Illustrated & Unabridged (Free Bonus Audiobook)

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Forbidden Books Of The Original New Testament by William Wake How is this book unique? Illustrations Included Free Audiobook A translation of many of the forbidden books of the Bible banned by the Council of Nicene, including the Gospels of the Infancy of Jesus, translated and published by William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury 1716-1737. Less than a century be Forbidden Books Of The Original New Testament by William Wake How is this book unique? Illustrations Included Free Audiobook A translation of many of the forbidden books of the Bible banned by the Council of Nicene, including the Gospels of the Infancy of Jesus, translated and published by William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury 1716-1737. Less than a century before, William Tyndale had been executed by the church for daring to translate the Bible into English. Wake believed that many, if not most, of these passages were historically accurate, even those showing the young Jesus in a less than sympathetic light. Some of the information contained herein may have been used as source material by proponents of the Da Vinci Code and other Templar-based legends.


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Forbidden Books Of The Original New Testament by William Wake How is this book unique? Illustrations Included Free Audiobook A translation of many of the forbidden books of the Bible banned by the Council of Nicene, including the Gospels of the Infancy of Jesus, translated and published by William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury 1716-1737. Less than a century be Forbidden Books Of The Original New Testament by William Wake How is this book unique? Illustrations Included Free Audiobook A translation of many of the forbidden books of the Bible banned by the Council of Nicene, including the Gospels of the Infancy of Jesus, translated and published by William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury 1716-1737. Less than a century before, William Tyndale had been executed by the church for daring to translate the Bible into English. Wake believed that many, if not most, of these passages were historically accurate, even those showing the young Jesus in a less than sympathetic light. Some of the information contained herein may have been used as source material by proponents of the Da Vinci Code and other Templar-based legends.

30 review for Forbidden Books Of The Original New Testament: By William Wake : Illustrated & Unabridged (Free Bonus Audiobook)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Pam Baddeley

    Found this far less interesting than anticipated. The Epistles in particular were extremely repetitive and I actually skipped those after the first one and a half. The other stories were slightly more interesting, but I could see why they were dropped from the official Bible. And they certainly lack the power and poetry of the King James edition. Some were also quite odd. Those that covered the childhood of Jesus showed him as being spiteful and causing various people to drop down dead just becau Found this far less interesting than anticipated. The Epistles in particular were extremely repetitive and I actually skipped those after the first one and a half. The other stories were slightly more interesting, but I could see why they were dropped from the official Bible. And they certainly lack the power and poetry of the King James edition. Some were also quite odd. Those that covered the childhood of Jesus showed him as being spiteful and causing various people to drop down dead just because they annoyed him in some way. So all in all I can only rate them at 1 star.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James Kiester

    Having read the entire Bible, a chapter a day, I figured I’d continue my reading by exploring the books which the Council of Carthage didn't include in the canonical Bible. I began by reading The Apocrypha, which is a collection of stories about the Jews of The Old Testament. That was fine. I found a series of tales chronicling a chosen people overcoming adversity through faith. It’s some pretty inspiring stuff. Once I finished The Apocrypha, I moved on to the Forbidden Books of the Original New Having read the entire Bible, a chapter a day, I figured I’d continue my reading by exploring the books which the Council of Carthage didn't include in the canonical Bible. I began by reading The Apocrypha, which is a collection of stories about the Jews of The Old Testament. That was fine. I found a series of tales chronicling a chosen people overcoming adversity through faith. It’s some pretty inspiring stuff. Once I finished The Apocrypha, I moved on to the Forbidden Books of the Original New Testament, by William Wake. The idea of angels tutoring Mary, as a child, to prepare to be the mother of Jesus was new to me, but it made a certain kind of sense. I could even buy the idea of Mary healing people with Jesus’ bath water. Then I got to tales of Jesus’ early years. The first Gospel of the INFANCY of JESUS CHRIST Chapter 19: 22-24 ~ "22 Another time, when the Lord Jesus was coming home in the evening with Joseph, he met a boy, who ran so hard against him, that he threw him down; 23 To whom the Lord Jesus said, As thou hast thrown me down, so shalt thou fall, nor ever rise. 24 And that moment the boy fell down and died." Essentially, Jesus killed a kid for being mean to him. Another story has a boy hitting Jesus, so Jesus retaliates by making the boy’s body to wither into a corpse. These stories depict the power of Jesus, but dismiss the mercy and forgiveness of Jesus. I don't think we worship Jesus merely because he’s powerful. We worship Jesus because he's part of a loving compassionate God. Power without compassion can be a human failing, but hardly describes the Christian God that I know. Bottom line, not all books professing to be about Jesus are about the Jesus Christ which Christians have a personal relationship with.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John

    The family of Jesus before His birth Excellent, thoughtful, and controversial; probably was suppressed from the masses. Reading is recommended. Various religious authorities confirm this work, but it is not canonized.

  4. 4 out of 5

    James Crawford

    Written by Archbishop Wake who was the Archbishop of Canterbury (1716-1737). I looked this up on the Internet to check on the author to see if he was legitimate and it appears he is. He starts off referring to the Nicene Council (who decided what books would and would not be in the 'official' Bible) as 'pious frauds.' He says one particular bishop basically got his opponent and that man's supporters kicked out. The Gospel of the Birth of Mary The story is basically that of Joseph getting yelled ou Written by Archbishop Wake who was the Archbishop of Canterbury (1716-1737). I looked this up on the Internet to check on the author to see if he was legitimate and it appears he is. He starts off referring to the Nicene Council (who decided what books would and would not be in the 'official' Bible) as 'pious frauds.' He says one particular bishop basically got his opponent and that man's supporters kicked out. The Gospel of the Birth of Mary The story is basically that of Joseph getting yelled out by the High Priest for not having children. An angel appeared to him later and told him about what would happen and how he would end up having a wife and child. Mary, when she was three years old, was taken to the Temple to study and be raised there. She grew up talking to angels and being pretty much a perfect young lady. When she was 14, though, the guy running the place it was time for all girls of her age to leave and do what they were supposed to do and that is find themselves husbands. Mary said no. Something strange happened in the temp, a 'mercy seat' talking or something like that. Anyhow, the guy in charge got his mind changed. There is also a reference to Mary's 'first born' which would indicate that she had at least one other child after Jesus. There are some references in other works to 'James' being the brother of Jesus. The Protevangelion Again there's the prejudice against Joachim for not having kids. There are differences, though, from the Birth of Mary section. In this section Mary is 12 instead of 14, for example. There's the wise men story and the murder of the young children under Herod's orders. Zachiarias is murdered and this leads to the death of around 94,000 others. There is one really odd thing, though. Joseph is walking along looking for a midwife for Mary. He passes people who are eating but everything seems to stop. Their motions are frozen and there seems to be a complete time stoppage. This doesn't seem to be tied into anything else before or after. It's a definite paranormal event, though, and it would be interesting to know if any sources of similar age refer to this type of thing happening elsewhere. The Gospel of the Infancy of Jesus Christ This is one section that is really, really upsetting and very, very strange. Jesus appears able to speak while he's still in the crib. Mary is referred to as 'St. Mary.' There is a woman that takes the foreskin of Jesus (or perhaps the placenta) and puts it into a jar with spikenard ointment. Later this is the stuff that is used in the situation where a woman washes his feet. Odd. Joseph, Mary and Jesus are in Egypt and there seem to be a lot of cures that are worked. Jesus meets the two thieves that were later crucified with him and he talks to them. Then it's revealed that Judas, as a boy, was possessed by Satan. He hits Jesus and the side he hit Jesus on is where he was pierced by the spear. If this all isn't strange enough there's the part about Jesus playing a king along with a few other boys who are his underlings. There are several instances in which Jesus kills some boys and even a teacher. This whole section section is really incredibly strange. The Epistle of St Paul the Apostle to Laodiceans A very, very short entry. Paul refers to 'my' converts which to me seems a little self-centered. Converts shouldn't have been counted like some kind of competition among the apostles. The other thing that bothered me was his phrase 'act in fear.' That doesn't seem a way to live at all. Act in respect, act with thought, act with knowledge but don't let your life be ruled by fear. The Epistles of St. Paul, the Apostle, to Seneca, with Seneca's to Paul This refers to a book Paul wrote of his Epistles. The Roman Emperor, according to this entry, liked Paul's epistles. There were serious fires in Rome at the time. Seneca was in Caesar's household. Another short entry. The Epistles of Jesus Christ and Abgarus, king of Edessa Another short entry. This is a letter from Abgarus requesting healing to cure a disease. Jesus' answer was that, after he goes to heaven, he'll have one of his disciplines come and do the curing. The basic book says that this section may or may not be genuine. The Gospel of Nicodemus This section is very similar to material in the 'accepted' Bible. It covers the whole part about Pontius Pilate talking to the Jews, their complains about Jesus, Pilate giving them a choice of who to save and the Jews voting to save Barabas. In this book Pilate comes across as a decent man. He basically acted as a judge and listened to all the evidence given to him.He seems to have not have been prejudiced one way or the other. It was kind of like a trial the way he heard evidence from both sides. The entry then goes on through the crucifixion, Jesus being put in a tomb and Mary Magdalene being at the tomb. Then it gets really weird. The next part seems to take place in some version of hell. Adam, though, and prophets that had already died were there (why?) Adam talks about therirbeing 5,500 years until the end times. Then it talks about Satan who is not the leader in hell. Beelzebub is the prince of hell, apparently. (This part seems more like ancient mythology of an underworld where the dead go but not to be punished.) Jesus comes down and frees the tormented souls. St. Thomas' Gospel of the Infancy of Jesus Christ. Another very short entry. It's also an incredibly nasty story. Jesus made some birds out of clay and then brought them to life and they flew away. That part is okay. But, and a big but, he strikes back at people that bother him. He causes a boy to become withered, he outright kills another boy and he blinds people who complain about what he is doing. Fortunately, this is a very short section. I hate to imaging what else it might have said. The Acts of St. Paul and Thecla This is all about a virgin named Thecla who listened to Paul and became a follower of his. Paul says that 'God is a god of vengeance' which isn't very comforting She undergoes a series of events where the politicos try to kill her including being burnt at the state (rain put out the fire) and being thrown to the beasts (one of which protected her from the others.) There is also a very interesting bit about physicians being angry with her since she was a follower of Paul and healings could be done. This is similar to what happened during the witch trials. The 'wise woman' were basically herbalists and could sometimes actually cure people of disease. The physicians hated the competition and were one of the forces who stirred up hate against the wise woman who were termed witches. The worst part is where one of the politicos hires some guys to go and rape her. She manages to escape. The author of the basic book notes that this entry could be a forgery. The First Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians He praises them but mentions something about sedition. He also talks about wives and 'keeping them within the bonds of due obedience.' He talks about the Cain and Abel story and opponents of Moses. He notes that Peter and Paul are dead at the time. He stresses repentance and that 'you're condemned if you do not worship God.' An interesting line is 'The merciful shall inherit the Earth', changing the word weak to merciful. Offerings must be at a certain time but certain people and in a certain place. Death is the price of not doing it that exact way. He also notes that there is some kind of argument going on among Christians. The Second Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians How to praise Jesus and how people used to worship things like brass and wood structures. Do not sacrifice to dead gods. Worship God with lips and heart and mind. Then he talks about how to behave properly. The General Epistle of Barnabas God has abolished legal sacrifices. Incense is an abomination. He doesn't like the Sabbath and hates appointed feasts. There should be no fasting and circumcision is to be abolished. 6000 years from then the world will end. He gives a lot of 'thou shalt nots.' The Epistle of Ignatius to the Ephesians He praises them. Their bishop is really good. 'The last times have come upon us.' He also goes after adultery. The Epistle of Ignatius to the Magnesians He praises them. Their bishop is young and they should respect him. Behave properly. The Epistle of Ignatius to the Trallans Avoid heresy. Be nice to your neighbor. Don't be mean to Gentiles. The Epistle of Ignatius to the Romans He wants to be sacrificed and be eaten by wild beasts. The Epistle of Ignatius to the Phillipians Stop arguing among yourselves. Flee divisions. Talks about the High Priest. The Epistle of Ignatius to the Smyrna He praises them. He talks about beasts in the shape of men. Don't have anything to do with non-Christians. Do things only the bishop is allowed to do. The Epistle of Ignatius to Polycarp Stay the course. Behave properly. Women should be satisfied with their own husbands. Love your wives. The Epistle of Polycarp to the Philippians The author notes that this epistle may not be genuine. Praises the people. Things people should not do. The love of money is the root of all evil. He attacks fornicators and those who are effeminate. Teaches sobriety. The First Part of the Book of Hermas Called His Vision He talks about a woman who is 'noble and beautiful.' He has an 'evil desire' in his heart. IN a vision he sees a great beast. Part 2 of above He tells believe to believe in he one god. Speak evil of none. Give alms. Don't lie. If a guy divorces a wife for adultery then he can't remarry. Be patient and long suffering. He talks about the 'angel of inequity.' Flee from evil. Do good works. Sadness is bad. Part 3 of above Help the needy. No adultery. Being rich does not equal being godly. Don't defile your body. Repenting isn't enough. Then he tells this long story about 10 virgins who build a great white tower. There is dispute about the authenticity of this epistle.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Honeybee

    I was intrigued by the title of this book, Forbidden Books of the Original New Testament. The author asserted that these were originally part of the Christian Bible, but then they were excluded from the Canon of legitimate Scripture. He made it sound like a horrible shame that these were removed, so I wanted to see for myself whether he was right. Having read a good portion of this lengthy and tedious tome, I can tell you that he was grossly mistaken! This is a collection of what Bible scholars I was intrigued by the title of this book, Forbidden Books of the Original New Testament. The author asserted that these were originally part of the Christian Bible, but then they were excluded from the Canon of legitimate Scripture. He made it sound like a horrible shame that these were removed, so I wanted to see for myself whether he was right. Having read a good portion of this lengthy and tedious tome, I can tell you that he was grossly mistaken! This is a collection of what Bible scholars rightly identify as "pseudepigrapha," or writings falsely attributed to someone. Basically, the "gospels" of Thomas, Mary, and others are pious fairy tales. They are stories made up about Jesus, His mother, and others that attempt to fill in gaps in the true Gospel narratives of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. They portray Mary as some miracle-working saint, even before the day of Pentecost. Jesus as a boy is depicted behaving in a way totally contrary to His true character and nature--being a show-off, talking disrespectfully to His elders, and taking someone's life for offending Him! Letters attributed to the Apostle Paul are completely out of character, as well. Reading this nonsense, I can definitely see why the Roman Catholic and Orthodox religions have picked up such erroneous teaching as the "ever virgin state" of Mary, unmarried priesthood, and other falsehoods contradicted by legitimate Scripture. Only those ignorant of the true Bible and it's overall revelation of the character and nature of God would consider this fiction as real! I got so disgusted reading such heresy, I quit about halfway through. Do yourself a favor. Unless you have to read this for some sort of assignment, don't waste your time. Even though the book is free, it will still cost too much to read it! Contrary to what the editor of the book contends, those who compiled the books of our Christian Bibles had myriad excellent reasons for excluding these books. It's not some conspiracy to hide the truth from us; they were protecting us from consuming a pack of pretty little lies!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne

    A very interesting read. So, back in the 3rd century a bunch of dudes got together and decided what books would be included in the Christian Bible and what wouldn't be. These are the books that didn't make the cut. As a philosophical question, I find some of the books to be pretty far out there, but is that only because I didn't grow up with the stories that I find them weird? There are some things in the Bible that are pretty weird when you think about them. I also find it interesting how many o A very interesting read. So, back in the 3rd century a bunch of dudes got together and decided what books would be included in the Christian Bible and what wouldn't be. These are the books that didn't make the cut. As a philosophical question, I find some of the books to be pretty far out there, but is that only because I didn't grow up with the stories that I find them weird? There are some things in the Bible that are pretty weird when you think about them. I also find it interesting how many of the books include stories about women. Strong women at that. I find it interesting, for instance, that the book of Ruth is included with today's Bible. The story of a woman who devotedly follows her mother in law and dutifully marries a righteous man. However, the story of Judith is not included, which is the story of a woman who devotedly followed Paul and swears off all men to live her life in chastity and devotion to God. I understand that after the death of Christ there was a strong feeling about chastity and the end times. So, perhaps by the time of the 3rd century the church leaders felt they had to move away from that or else they wouldn't have future generations. It's interesting to think about. Some books I also appreciated were the Book of Mary, where she uses Jesus' bathwater and swaddling cloths to perform miracles. Also, the Book of Hermas, where he not only has visions from the angels, he demands from them detailed explanations about what it all means, leaving nothing open to interpretation. Overall, an interesting read with food for thought.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alan Lewis

    Read nearly all of these at least once before in other collections. Varies in quality from example to example.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dustin

    After reading these I can obviously see how some were rejected as being works truly inspired by the Holy Spirit. Some, however, seemed to still have some value. I can see in all why they were not canonized except the Epistle Barnabus, which I found to be useful.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Raf Uzar

    First half great, second part less so.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Iva Fisher

    History in Theological context An early response similar in scope to Bart Ehrman. There is a small but intense battle over these books. Today these are considered to be Gnostic works but many throughout Christian history have considered them just as canonical as the bible we have today. The book does show it's age with the phrasing the author uses. Keeping that in proper perspective, there is insight into the early church and what these early believers considered gospel. Christianity was not som History in Theological context An early response similar in scope to Bart Ehrman. There is a small but intense battle over these books. Today these are considered to be Gnostic works but many throughout Christian history have considered them just as canonical as the bible we have today. The book does show it's age with the phrasing the author uses. Keeping that in proper perspective, there is insight into the early church and what these early believers considered gospel. Christianity was not some all encompassing monolith in it's first years. Reading what they wrote gives us a glimpse at a past that is too easily forgotten.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Deder

    Insightful If curious to know why any work would be considered forbidden to any soul seeking to understand the truth I strongly recommend this work. Provides a greater understanding into the New testament hearing from a different perspectives that could threatens certain religious sects or authorities

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hanna Novotny

    New names to investigate. I found the letters between Seneca and Paul interesting. Seneca getting messages from Paul to Nero. I understand why some of the books were left out of the Bible. When the role of a woman was too strong, anti-Semitic texts, some miracles. All in all I am happy to have read this. Not believing all is true, but still very interesting.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Judy Ford

    It was interesting reading, but some of it got quite repetitive. I have every sympathy with the church fathers for declining to keep all this in the canon. I'd long been aware of the apocryphal gospels, but didn't realise how much other apocryphal work there was - epistles and revelation too. It was interesting reading, but some of it got quite repetitive. I have every sympathy with the church fathers for declining to keep all this in the canon. I'd long been aware of the apocryphal gospels, but didn't realise how much other apocryphal work there was - epistles and revelation too.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Adam Ford

    The best stuff here is about the young Jesus, and how he would kill people (or threaten to kill people) just because they were pissing him off. Unfortunately, there's also a lot of anti-Semitism in here, which is really bad and gets serious star reductions. The best stuff here is about the young Jesus, and how he would kill people (or threaten to kill people) just because they were pissing him off. Unfortunately, there's also a lot of anti-Semitism in here, which is really bad and gets serious star reductions.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ryan D. D.

    Lot's of misspellings needs a major edit. However, eye opening. Forbidden books one quickly learns why. Maybe it's truth maybe it's fiction that varies on your beliefs either way it is Apocryphal text removed from the bible. Lot's of misspellings needs a major edit. However, eye opening. Forbidden books one quickly learns why. Maybe it's truth maybe it's fiction that varies on your beliefs either way it is Apocryphal text removed from the bible.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael Millar

    The text and only the text This is a brilliant compilation of the apocryphal new testament. I was a bit disappointed with the lack of proof reading, which would have greatly improved the readability of the documents.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Leah Cappaletti

    Very Confusing at times

  18. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    interesting

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Lofink

    Tedious. Also, texts are of dubious value and origin.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Callum D

    Literally what it says on the tin, a compilation of Christian Apocrypha, some are very interesting (Infancy Gospels, Paul & Thecla). Some (Letters, Shepard of Hermas) not so much...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Rae

    There are Reasons They Didn’t Make the Cut There are reasons these books didn’t make the Bible cut. The formatting made it hard to read. I wouldn’t suggest the time to read it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    triena ROGERS

    Helped me with my studies

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    There are some fascinating pieces in here but a whole lot of fluff also. So maybe about 30 pages of real content.

  24. 4 out of 5

    James Hold

    Available from Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/6516/6... I don't know who Archbishop Wake is and the preface doesn't tell me anything about him. The overly long subtitle is THE SUPPRESSED GOSPELS AND EPISTLES OF THE ORIGINAL NEW TESTAMENT OF JESUS THE CHRIST AND OTHER PORTIONS OF THE ANCIENT HOLY SCRIPTURES. NOW EXTANT, ATTRIBUTED TO HIS APOSTLES, AND THEIR DISCIPLES, AND VENERATED BY THE PRIMITIVE CHRISTIAN CHURCHES DURING THE FIRST FOUR CENTURIES, BUT SINCE, AFTER VIOLENT DISPUTATIONS Available from Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/6516/6... I don't know who Archbishop Wake is and the preface doesn't tell me anything about him. The overly long subtitle is THE SUPPRESSED GOSPELS AND EPISTLES OF THE ORIGINAL NEW TESTAMENT OF JESUS THE CHRIST AND OTHER PORTIONS OF THE ANCIENT HOLY SCRIPTURES. NOW EXTANT, ATTRIBUTED TO HIS APOSTLES, AND THEIR DISCIPLES, AND VENERATED BY THE PRIMITIVE CHRISTIAN CHURCHES DURING THE FIRST FOUR CENTURIES, BUT SINCE, AFTER VIOLENT DISPUTATIONS FORBIDDEN BY THE BISHOPS OF THE NICENE COUNCIL, IN THE REIGN OF THE EMPEROR CONSTANTINE AND OMITTED FROM THE CATHOLICS AND PROTESTANT EDITIONS OF THE NEW TESTAMENT, BY ITS COMPILERS. In other words it's a bunch of 'scriptural' texts that are not found in the New Testament Bible. In many cases I can understand why because they don't contribute anything to the Gospel message. It includes 'gospels' about the birth of Mary, three about the childhood of Jesus (one supposedly by St Thomas), Nicodemus' account of Jesus' trial before Pilate, an exchange of letters between Christ and King Abgarus (especially suspect since there's no accounts of Jesus having carried on written exchanges with anyone), THE EPISTLE OF ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE TO THE LAODICEANS (which might be for real but it has its doubters), correspondence between Paul and Seneca, some supplemental Acts and Epistles written by others. I was especially interested in THE EPISTLE OF IGNATIUS TO THE MAGNESIANS since I've been having gastric problems lately and hoped something in there might help. Also disappointing was THE EPISTLE OF IGNATIUS TO THE TRALLIANS which sounds like a Star Trek episode but isn't. However IGNATIUS TO THE PHILADELPHIANS does contain a wonderful recipe for a cheese sandwich. Okay. Sorry. I shouldn't make fun of this. It's only that I heard a lot of this stuff is considered forgeries that were produced long after the fact. And even if it is authentic, it's not as if you'll go Hell for not knowing about it. I'm sure whatever the case it was heartfelt and sincere, but as I said at the start it doesn't advance the Gospel message or add any new insights. An interesting curiosity if you're into that sort of thing, but it's not 'accepted Gospel' and there's no reason to treat it as such.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Fred Kohn

    This book was a free download so I figured- what the hey. I've read a lot of these books before in more up to date language, but I found it interesting that as significant a figure as an Archbishop of Canterbury would raise significant questions about the wisdom of the Church Fathers in their choice of canonical scriptures. I am a bit confused about whether Wake himself felt these books should have been included or whether that is the opinion Edward Hancock, who wrote a preface to these books in This book was a free download so I figured- what the hey. I've read a lot of these books before in more up to date language, but I found it interesting that as significant a figure as an Archbishop of Canterbury would raise significant questions about the wisdom of the Church Fathers in their choice of canonical scriptures. I am a bit confused about whether Wake himself felt these books should have been included or whether that is the opinion Edward Hancock, who wrote a preface to these books in 1863. Hancock repeats a fantastic tale that he says originates with Pappus (the 4th century Bishop?): 'He tells us, that having "promiscuously put all the books that were referred to the Council for deliberation under the communion-table in a church, they besought the Lord that the inspired writings might get on the table, while the spurious ones remained underneath; and that it happened accordingly!" (See Com. Mace's N. T. p. 875.) Therefore, good reader, every Christian sect from the fourth century to the present period, have been blessed with the books that climbed upon the communion-table, and in consequence were deemed inspired and canonical; at the same time have been forbidden to read the Gospels and Epistles herein published, because they could not perform the same feat, but remained under the table, and were condemned accordingly, as uninspired and apocryphal writings.'

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brian King

    G.K. Chesterton (while still an atheist) wrote about his experience with Colonel Ingersoll's atheistic lectures "the dreadful thought broke across my mind, 'Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.'" The problem with these writings is so obviously apparent to all who read them that I cannot believe William Wake puts this book forth seriously with such a title. If you have a doubt about the gospels of Thomas or others READ THEM PEOPLE! Please, if you have any doubt about the books that were r G.K. Chesterton (while still an atheist) wrote about his experience with Colonel Ingersoll's atheistic lectures "the dreadful thought broke across my mind, 'Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.'" The problem with these writings is so obviously apparent to all who read them that I cannot believe William Wake puts this book forth seriously with such a title. If you have a doubt about the gospels of Thomas or others READ THEM PEOPLE! Please, if you have any doubt about the books that were rejected from the Canon, I suggest you read this book to see why they are not included. Like Chesterton reading Ingersoll, by reading one who supports these junk books you will easily see the absurdity of them, and in the even momentary comparison with the New Testament documents, your faith will be strengthened!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Portillo

    Very Inyeresting I choose this rating because there are quite a few epistles that have not been added to the traditional canon enclosed in this book. It also contains a brief summary at the end of each epistle a brief summary of who has considered these epistles to be considered as instructive to all believers. While these epistles are not included within the protestant, catholic, orthodox, or Coptic canons they do appear to be informative and enlightening.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia L. Riser

    I do not know why the testimonies were omitted, I, am a believer in hearing all and allowing and trusting the reader to decide on the value of what they read. History has shown throughout that men of power use control to put forth the message that best serves their desires. Thus comes the form of spinning the story.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Terry Nye

    I truly Enjoined this collection This Collection spoke to my soul,I believe the books are inspired by a true belief in the Divine. I can see why certain branches of the church would not like these teaching's. It's the straight storyline, No Spin. Little hard to read, it's 2 century's old I Will read parts Again & again. I truly Enjoined this collection This Collection spoke to my soul,I believe the books are inspired by a true belief in the Divine. I can see why certain branches of the church would not like these teaching's. It's the straight storyline, No Spin. Little hard to read, it's 2 century's old I Will read parts Again & again.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Hoyt

    Good Book I enjoyed reading the book. I can see why the early church fathers deemed the books heretical. The text add things that are not in the biblical text. They tend to deviate a great deal from the canonical text and to me are unbelievable.

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