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The Shepherd Of The Hills: By Harold Bell Wright - Illustrated (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books To the beautiful Ozark hill country comes a man from the world of cities. Among the people o How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books To the beautiful Ozark hill country comes a man from the world of cities. Among the people of the district, with their simple, direct ideas and way of life, he finds the peaceful atmosphere he craves, while his more intellectual philosophy and character come to be valuable elements in the lives of his ne friends. From his relationship with "Sammy" Lane and the Matthews family arise in dramatic fashion the gripping situations and thrilling incidents that bring him into a peculiarly intimate connection with these people, their country, and their simple life.


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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books To the beautiful Ozark hill country comes a man from the world of cities. Among the people o How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books To the beautiful Ozark hill country comes a man from the world of cities. Among the people of the district, with their simple, direct ideas and way of life, he finds the peaceful atmosphere he craves, while his more intellectual philosophy and character come to be valuable elements in the lives of his ne friends. From his relationship with "Sammy" Lane and the Matthews family arise in dramatic fashion the gripping situations and thrilling incidents that bring him into a peculiarly intimate connection with these people, their country, and their simple life.

30 review for The Shepherd Of The Hills: By Harold Bell Wright - Illustrated (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dorcas

    4.5 Stars Have you ever been so intimidated by the plethora of 5 star reviews of a particular book that you dare not pick it up for fear of disappointment? This happens to me occasionally and is probably the main reason this lovely 1907 dustjacketed book stood in my bookcase for well over a year before I read it. Shocking, I know. Still,  I'm a firm believer in "the right book at the right time" and this was the right time so it all worked out. I won't go into detail on the plot because there's a l 4.5 Stars Have you ever been so intimidated by the plethora of 5 star reviews of a particular book that you dare not pick it up for fear of disappointment? This happens to me occasionally and is probably the main reason this lovely 1907 dustjacketed book stood in my bookcase for well over a year before I read it. Shocking, I know. Still,  I'm a firm believer in "the right book at the right time" and this was the right time so it all worked out. I won't go into detail on the plot because there's a lot of reviews on this already. Basic story line: An older city gentleman moves to the Ozark mountains to get away from society,  purge his demons and try to make amends for something in his past. There he settles down more comfortably than expected and becomes "one of the family" to the mountain folk who live there, 'finding himself' in the process. But old secrets die hard...or not at all. This book had a little of everything: the mad boy who runs wild in the hills, strange sounds in the forests, a forgotten gold mine, larger than life "Lorna Doone-type" menfolk, drought, poverty, redemption, romance etc. The author was apparently a minister before he turned to writing, but this is not a preachy or doctrinal book. Moralizing, ok perhaps a little, (the author had a "real men work the land" mentality)  but no sermonizing or religious agenda. The characters believe in God as the Creator and that is a part of who they are. But the characters are multi faceted and flawed. They make mistakes and grow from them, learning the true meaning of being a "sure enough" lady or gentleman, and this really touches the heart of the reader. A good, old fashioned read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    An extraordinary story. Beautiful writing. Down-to-earth characters. One of my all-time favourite books, I'm sure. I am speechless and can think of no better way to honour this book than to quote this beautiful passage. Here and there among men, there are those who pause in the hurried rush to listen to the call of a life that is more real. How often have we seen them, David, jostled and ridiculed by their fellows, pushed aside and forgotten, as incompetent or unworthy. He who sees and hears too An extraordinary story. Beautiful writing. Down-to-earth characters. One of my all-time favourite books, I'm sure. I am speechless and can think of no better way to honour this book than to quote this beautiful passage. Here and there among men, there are those who pause in the hurried rush to listen to the call of a life that is more real. How often have we seen them, David, jostled and ridiculed by their fellows, pushed aside and forgotten, as incompetent or unworthy. He who sees and hears too much is cursed for a dreamer, a fanatic, or a fool, by the mad mob, who, having eyes, see not, ears and hear not, and refuse to understand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pete knew a world unseen by us, and we, therefore, fancied ourselves wiser than he. The wind in the pines, the rustle of the leaves, the murmur of the brook, the growl of the thunder, and the voices of the night were all understood and answered by him. The flowers, the trees, the rocks, the hills, the clouds were to him, not lifeless things, but living friends, who laughed and wept with him as he was gay or sorrowful. Poor Pete,' we said. Was he in truth, David, poorer or richer than we?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Presley

    The first time I read this book I was about 9 years old. It sat, along with several other Harold Bell Wright books, on my dad's bookshelf. I can still feel the old cover if I close my eyes and imagine it. So it's safe to say there's a lot of memories held within this books pages. I remember shortly after I read it my family took a trip to the Ozarks in Missouri. It's pretty famous there and there is even a life showing held out doors. As I re-read the story over the last few days I found myself r The first time I read this book I was about 9 years old. It sat, along with several other Harold Bell Wright books, on my dad's bookshelf. I can still feel the old cover if I close my eyes and imagine it. So it's safe to say there's a lot of memories held within this books pages. I remember shortly after I read it my family took a trip to the Ozarks in Missouri. It's pretty famous there and there is even a life showing held out doors. As I re-read the story over the last few days I found myself recalling bits and pieces of seeing it there, live on the stage. Wright does such a fantastic job of describing his characters. From the young giant, Grant Matthews (Young Matt) to the beautiful Sammy Lane. Every character has a unique feel to him or her and.. well there just aren't words to describe how much I enjoyed re-acquainting myself with them. If you are a nature lover, you would love this book. If you love good, solid stories dealing with life, love, death, heartache and a return to faith, you would love this book. And even though the book is somewhat dated its principles still apply to today. This book is one of my favorites and I'm just sad I haven't made time to revisit it sooner.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jessaka

    The Beauty of the Ozarks This is the second time that I have read this book, the first being 65 years ago when I was a teenager. I just wanted to see if it was as great as I thought it was back then, especially since it had been one of my favorite books. Yet, I am often disappointed after re reading a book that I once loved. This book came into my hands by way of a librarian who chose it for me. When I finished the book I asked her if she could find me more books about mountain people, and that sh The Beauty of the Ozarks This is the second time that I have read this book, the first being 65 years ago when I was a teenager. I just wanted to see if it was as great as I thought it was back then, especially since it had been one of my favorite books. Yet, I am often disappointed after re reading a book that I once loved. This book came into my hands by way of a librarian who chose it for me. When I finished the book I asked her if she could find me more books about mountain people, and that she did: “The Little Shepherd of Kingdome Come,” “The Trail of the Lonesome Pine,” “The Bee Keeper,” and “The Girl of the Limberlost.” I found two books on my own: “Bald Knobbers,” and “Tobacco Road.” When I brought “Tobacco Road” home, my mom saw it, took it away from me, read it, and said that it was “too dirty” for me to read. I read it at a later date when I thought of it. I didn’t really like it because it depicted a different type of mountain people, the kind I would not wish to befriend. Set in the Ozark Mountains, the author painted a beautiful picture of the area, and I wanted so much to see it. When I was sixteen in August, my step-uncle and grandmother had cousins in West Plains, MO that they wanted to visit, and they invited me to come with them. California was no longer green due to the hot summer sun and lack of rain. The Ozarks were beautiful with their green rolling hills, and it rained some every day. I fell in love with those green hills, with the Ozarks, so much so, that when my husband and I retired, we began looking for a place to buy a home, and ended up in another part of the Ozarks, Eastern Oklahoma. Again, rolling lush green hills in the summer. and humidity. The chiggers, which I didn’t know were here, are just as horrible as they were in West Plains. This kind of paradise has its price, bugs, humidity and lots of pollen that bother me more as I age. After moving here, I reread “The Bald Knobbers,” again, because I remembered how much I liked that non-fiction book about the vigilantes that roamed the hills of Branson, MO. So, when my sister and niece came to visit, we headed for Branson, but not to see where this book had taken place. I wanted to see Bald Knob Mountain. I think the book called it Dewey Mountain. We drove into a small town on our way to find it, and they were having a Bald Knobber play in their city park, nothing sophisticated. I bought a T-shirt with a painting of a Bald Knobber on its front. It looks evil with its horns on top of the man’s hooded head. I have yet to wear it. We were then directed to the mountain where the Knobbers held their meetings, but we could not drive up to see it because the owner didn’t allow visitors. Yet, it didn’t look like a mountain at all to me. No matter where I have traveled in the Ozarks, mountains look like hills. At least that is what we call them in California. After leaving the Branson area, we drove to West Plains, and I got to see that lovely town once again. I even found the old watch shop where my uncle had taken me where he could get his watch fixed. While it was no longer a watch shop, the old counter was still in the same place. I could almost see the old watch repairman sitting behind it with his magnifying glass in front of his eye, held on by a leather band that was wrapped around his head. Then we walked down the street to an antique store, where I found an antique flour sack quilt top. When I came home, I had it quilted, and was even able to do some of the work myself. So, what was this book like the second time around? Well, in short, it was only a three-star read for me this time, but my star rating remains as it was when I was young. What made it different? Wright was into eugenics and thought that humans should be bread like pigs to make what he called “finest human specimens.” I googled “origin of eugenics,” and I learned that Plato was also into it. Perhaps, it was first thought up by him, but I doubt it. Wright referred to tall and muscled men as great specimens. And in the book, he interchanged some men’s names with the word, “Giant.” One of their men folk went to college, and when he came home it was noted that he had lost his muscles; he was now a weakling. Next, Wright was complaining about education. I suppose this came from the Holy Bible, where it warns against listening to the philosophies of men. Maybe I am right about this, but I had heard this scripture used as a reason to not go to college. So, this book was a rough start for me. Yet, if you can wade through all this, it would be a great story. It begins with a stranger coming up the mountain on horseback. He became The Shepherd. While his real name was Daniel, he was later called, Dad. I was surprised that Wright didn’t have him riding a donkey. Just that The Shepherd always reminded me of Christ. The word Dad reminds me of Our Father. And we know where Danile came from. Right now I am wondering if the book of Daniel prophesied the coming of Christ. So, Daniel was riding up the mountain and met a man on the trail. He stopped to ask him if he knew of a place where he could stay the night and was directed to Mr. Matthew’s homestead. Matthew took him in and soon had him tending to his sheep. Now we get to meet the other people who lived in the mountains, and they are all fine Christian folks. At least there was no preaching, but at the end of the book there is talk of God, not the fire and brimstone kind that I expected, but a God that created everything, a God that was palatable to me. There was talk of the Bald Knobbers, which I did not recall being in this book, but perhaps that was why I picked up that book about them at my childhood library in the first place. It was said that the government stopped the vigilante group when it realized that they had become just as bad as those that they were trying to stop committing crimes. Ah, but they had a few left in Wright’s book, because near the end of the book they held a meeting, but it didn’t go very well. There were two love stories in this book. One ended in tragedy; the other difn’u. Even Dad’s life was tragic. He had come there to get away from the city, from what was bothering him. He finally had to face his own demons. So, why did I love this book as a young girl? The author painted the Ozark country in beautiful colors, the people were wonderful, except for a few, and it was wholesome. And last of all, I still love books about mountain people. [

  5. 4 out of 5

    Vivian

    I found a 1907 edition of this book and snapped it up, knowing it to be my mother's FAVORITE book of all time. I had given her a paperback reprint but she insisted that it had been edited and was not as good. I began reading them simultaneously and found her accusation to be true. First, the country dialects have been removed, possibly because they cast those who use them as less educated and refined and also because many of today's reader's don't wish to be slowed down with stumbling through pr I found a 1907 edition of this book and snapped it up, knowing it to be my mother's FAVORITE book of all time. I had given her a paperback reprint but she insisted that it had been edited and was not as good. I began reading them simultaneously and found her accusation to be true. First, the country dialects have been removed, possibly because they cast those who use them as less educated and refined and also because many of today's reader's don't wish to be slowed down with stumbling through pronunciations. I soon set the edited paperback aside and read only from the original volume. Editing dialect out of books changes the spirit of a book. How is the reader to fully appreciate how new-comer "Dad" Howitt was held in esteem by his back-woods neighbors? How is the reader to detect the transformation of Sammy under his tutelage? How is the reader to know why Sammy works so hard to become worthy of her childhood betrothed who has come into fortune, education, and position where she is destined to join him outside the hills of their youth? Will the reader come to love the hill folks "just as they are" with all that means, as the Shepherd does? Part Cinderella, part Beauty, part Phantom, this story echoes the human drama as Dickens and Hugo wrote. Like Thomas Hardy, Bell writes of that fragile transition from agrarian subsistence to frenzied industrialism. He presents to readers his thoughts on what real manhood and real womanhood is. Whether or not today's reader agrees is less predictable than it was to those who first read and loved his work. I admit I used about 20 hankies through the last ten chapters. How much that had to do with my suffering from a cold, I'll never know.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    3.25 stars. I enjoyed this a lot more than I thought I would. I found the views on manhood and womanhood to be a bit conflicting at times. sometimes it seemed more progressive than I expected, and other times extremely archaic. The mystery and intrigue kept me interested, and it was nice to read a piece of literature that is such an important part of the Ozarks.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Darlene

    “Here and there among men, there are those who pause in the hurried rush to listen to the call of a life that is more real. How often have we seen them, jostled and ridiculed by their fellows, pushed aside and forgotten, as incompetent or unworthy. He who sees and hears too much is cursed for a dreamer, a fanatic, or a fool, by the mad mob, who, having eyes, see not, ears and hear not, and refuse to understand…We build temples and churches, but will not worship in them; we hire spiritual adviser “Here and there among men, there are those who pause in the hurried rush to listen to the call of a life that is more real. How often have we seen them, jostled and ridiculed by their fellows, pushed aside and forgotten, as incompetent or unworthy. He who sees and hears too much is cursed for a dreamer, a fanatic, or a fool, by the mad mob, who, having eyes, see not, ears and hear not, and refuse to understand…We build temples and churches, but will not worship in them; we hire spiritual advisers, but refuse to heed them; we buy Bibles, but will not read them; believing in God, we do not fear Him; acknowledging Christ, we neither follow nor obey Him. Only when we can no longer strive in the battle for earthly honors or material wealth, do we turn to the unseen but more enduring things of life; and, with ears and eyes blinded by the glare of passing pomp and folly, we strive to hear and see the things we have so long refused to consider.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tweety

    What a marvelous, prefect ending! Haven't got anything to say about it all yet.. I'll try writing a real review later. What a marvelous, prefect ending! Haven't got anything to say about it all yet.. I'll try writing a real review later.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jade

    There is a certain comfort about old tales that doesn't make them necessarily better than newer books, yet it's obvious they come from some special distant place. I read this one twice because the first time I wasn't paying attention well enough by the end and had way too many questions. I enjoyed it much more the second time and realized it was my distraction and not the book that made it confusing. I was very interested, as I read it again, in how the story would unfold, who really was the she There is a certain comfort about old tales that doesn't make them necessarily better than newer books, yet it's obvious they come from some special distant place. I read this one twice because the first time I wasn't paying attention well enough by the end and had way too many questions. I enjoyed it much more the second time and realized it was my distraction and not the book that made it confusing. I was very interested, as I read it again, in how the story would unfold, who really was the shepherd Mr. Howitt, before he came to the hills? And what kind of life would Sammy choose, but even more, what would it mean to her and why would she choose it? Touching and enduring in its subject matter, The Shepherd of the Hills left me feeling daydreamy and inspired. I also wondered in a good way about the back story, specifically, the lady in the painting. I love the easy touch of imperfection that old tales seem to have, the way Wright seems to have written his story as he knew it, and with composure, even if that means some dialogue may not be perfectly realistic. Modern day editors might have been snippety with it (as in wanting to change or "snip" parts of it), had it been written in this time. It is satisfying to read a "big" tale about the past people, the "Bald Knobbers" of the Ozarks, told with simplicity.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    I'm giving this 5 stars in honor of my mother who always told us it was one of her favorite books. She read it in high school. It took me a lot more years to finally get to it, but I agree it's a great read, good enough that I read it through twice in a row. It's an interesting tale with nice descriptions of the setting (one of the things my mom still remembers liking about it). Several little scenes leave you on the edge of your seat as to how they might turn out. There's a little romance, and I'm giving this 5 stars in honor of my mother who always told us it was one of her favorite books. She read it in high school. It took me a lot more years to finally get to it, but I agree it's a great read, good enough that I read it through twice in a row. It's an interesting tale with nice descriptions of the setting (one of the things my mom still remembers liking about it). Several little scenes leave you on the edge of your seat as to how they might turn out. There's a little romance, and some scandal. The honorable characters aren't perfect. They are trying to figure life out just like any of us, and each must face a crux in their lives in deciding whether or not they have courage and strength to take the high road. There are good moral lessons in the training of how to become a "shore 'nuff lady or gentleman" by avoiding shallow frivolities and developing depth of character instead.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    My family and I found ourselves on an unplanned trip to Branson a week ago. While there, at a little store, I found this "gold nugget". I had never heard of Shepherd on the Hills nor the author before and the back of the book read "Fourth best selling book ever published and second most sold next to the Bible". This sparked my interest. So, I bought it and began reading. It is by far one of the BEST books I have ever read. The details of each scene were perfect. Everytime I opened it I felt as i My family and I found ourselves on an unplanned trip to Branson a week ago. While there, at a little store, I found this "gold nugget". I had never heard of Shepherd on the Hills nor the author before and the back of the book read "Fourth best selling book ever published and second most sold next to the Bible". This sparked my interest. So, I bought it and began reading. It is by far one of the BEST books I have ever read. The details of each scene were perfect. Everytime I opened it I felt as if I were there witnessing with my own eyes and I felt that I personally knew the characters. It made me want to live back in those times. I wouldn't say it was a christian book but it was "wholesome", and I recommend young teenagers read it for a good character reading. I am now going to find more books by this author.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Keri

    Oh books of yesteryear! This book put Missouri (and Branson for that matter) on the map. For those of you who've never been, you'll fall in love with those Ozarks again and again in this novel. The people are pure, good and evil is obvious, where "ma" and "pa" comfort you. This book is like eating mashed potatoes and gravy on a cold fall day. Oh books of yesteryear! This book put Missouri (and Branson for that matter) on the map. For those of you who've never been, you'll fall in love with those Ozarks again and again in this novel. The people are pure, good and evil is obvious, where "ma" and "pa" comfort you. This book is like eating mashed potatoes and gravy on a cold fall day.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    This is an outstanding story. Young Matt (Grant Matthews) is a young, giant of a man living in the Ozarks with his parents in the late 1800s. His parents are hard-working, upright people who have raised him to possess good moral strength. The narrative pits him against the evil forces and numerous trials, which he handles with quiet dignity. He is the prototype for mankind. His perfect mate (physically and morally) is his childhood friend. She was promised to another before she knew about love a This is an outstanding story. Young Matt (Grant Matthews) is a young, giant of a man living in the Ozarks with his parents in the late 1800s. His parents are hard-working, upright people who have raised him to possess good moral strength. The narrative pits him against the evil forces and numerous trials, which he handles with quiet dignity. He is the prototype for mankind. His perfect mate (physically and morally) is his childhood friend. She was promised to another before she knew about love and compatibility. Their inter-relationship is one of the several threads which weave the fabric of this story. These two are pitted against a cross section of humankind and struggle with the challenges which beset all good people in that stage of life when they are coming of age. The narrator is an older, educated man (the Shepherd of the Hills) who has retired from city life to the bucolic life of the Ozarks to find his moral bearings and resolve issues that have plagued him for years and can only be resolved in this region of the Ozarks. There is a bit of the supernatural involved. The author masterfully lays out to the reader (through the narrative) those eternal principles which are essential to lead a person to find inner peace. This is a compelling tale and I highly recommend it to all readers. I especially recommend it to teenagers and young adults. It deserves a solid 5 rating. A true classic.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Susan Jo Grassi

    I'm not inclined to read romance novels but this is not a true romance novel. There is, of course, the love between a man and woman but there is so much more; the love of nature and of God and all his creatures, the beauty of the Ozark Mountains, the peace of a time long past, a time that will never come again. Most of all this is the story of the love of life. The constant learning, growing and discovering what life is about. What it means to truly live as oneself. There is mystery, fantasy, cr I'm not inclined to read romance novels but this is not a true romance novel. There is, of course, the love between a man and woman but there is so much more; the love of nature and of God and all his creatures, the beauty of the Ozark Mountains, the peace of a time long past, a time that will never come again. Most of all this is the story of the love of life. The constant learning, growing and discovering what life is about. What it means to truly live as oneself. There is mystery, fantasy, cruelty, strength of character, forgiveness and redemption within these pages. I read this book as a young girl but must admit that it means so much more to me now in my maturity.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    A wonderfully written, mysterious story showcasing the simple beauty of the Ozarks. This story has a bit of everything-- action, romance, good vs. evil, mystery-- all wrapped up with some wonderful lessons on what truly matters in life. Now I want to go back to Branson and catch the stage-play of this story!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Herthoes

    Wonderful book! Very captivating story set in the Ozarks in the early 1900's; full of mystery to the end. Dialect a little difficult to muddle through, at times (here's a freebie: " 'low" means "thought" ) but it's worth the wading. I plan to read the rest of the trilogy that I just learned about. Wonderful book! Very captivating story set in the Ozarks in the early 1900's; full of mystery to the end. Dialect a little difficult to muddle through, at times (here's a freebie: " 'low" means "thought" ) but it's worth the wading. I plan to read the rest of the trilogy that I just learned about.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    (view spoiler)[ Bettie's Books (hide spoiler)] (view spoiler)[ Bettie's Books (hide spoiler)]

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mazzou B

    loved this book! I am surprised I haven't read this classic before. I really liked the quality of this old book. I appreciated the character depth presented and the unique and dramatic back story. loved this book! I am surprised I haven't read this classic before. I really liked the quality of this old book. I appreciated the character depth presented and the unique and dramatic back story.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I am overcome by the beauty of this book. I thank my friend Courtney for telling me to read it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Josephine Briggs

    BACK IN TIMES HOW THE MISSOURI OZARKS ONCE WAS. I ordered this book because I read it a long time ago, then found people are still reading it, it is 110 years old, but timely for today. It is set in Missouri's Ozark Mountains when it was quiet and back woodsy, not as touristy as it is now. The Missouri Ozarks is loved as a vacation area. The book contains many stories, the love of nature and of God giving this beautiful world to mankind. A man moves into the country beaten down by life. His wife a BACK IN TIMES HOW THE MISSOURI OZARKS ONCE WAS. I ordered this book because I read it a long time ago, then found people are still reading it, it is 110 years old, but timely for today. It is set in Missouri's Ozark Mountains when it was quiet and back woodsy, not as touristy as it is now. The Missouri Ozarks is loved as a vacation area. The book contains many stories, the love of nature and of God giving this beautiful world to mankind. A man moves into the country beaten down by life. His wife and daughter are long dead, his son, an artist, has disappeared from his father's life. This man is a private person who wants to be left alone, he wants noone to know who he is or where he is. There are two young people who promised each other they would marry when they are old enough. The man moves to the city to be educated, his uncle will make him wealthy. The young lady, a tomboy, falls in love with another young man. Will she be tempted to leave the hill country or will she follow her heart? There is a strange boy, unworldly, beautiful, who does not seem to belong to earth. He loves nature, will not live inside, wanders around day and night, a haunted child who sees so much others do not see. There are the Bald Knobbers, vigilantes who are to be feared. There may be ghosts or haunts wandering the country, seeing but not being seen but felt. And also some lost treasures. This is such an uplifting book. It is a job to read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Janice

    This sweet, sentimental, spiritual book, published in 1907, tells a story of mountaineers scratching out a life in the Ozark Mountains. Set in Stone and Taney Counties, Missouri, the author's thick paint and wide brush illustrating the never ending pastoral scenes at times almost chokes out the story line. And at other places, where I think the author has dropped or forgotten the story, he eventually returns to tie up loose ends creating a ' happily ever after ' ending. The mountaineer dialect wi This sweet, sentimental, spiritual book, published in 1907, tells a story of mountaineers scratching out a life in the Ozark Mountains. Set in Stone and Taney Counties, Missouri, the author's thick paint and wide brush illustrating the never ending pastoral scenes at times almost chokes out the story line. And at other places, where I think the author has dropped or forgotten the story, he eventually returns to tie up loose ends creating a ' happily ever after ' ending. The mountaineer dialect will be off putting to some; as will the unsophisticated writing. Some will find this charming. For me, it is a walk through my back yard to a time and place where the forests and hills and streams spoke to the inhabitants. The inhabitants we soon learned to laugh at and refer to as Hillbillies. The Shepherd of the Hills by Harold Bell Wright pays tribute to these Ozark Mountains and these hill people. It was later generations who turned the characters and physical locations introduced in the book into the tourism industry we today call Branson.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Flobow Trust

    This was the only book my Father ever gave me. Dad was 61 years young when I was born so he was well acquainted with the older classics. When I first received this book, I laid it down and didn't go back to it for a couple of years. The first part of the book seemed to start "slow" for me. By the time I was finished, I didn't want to be finished! I love books like this that make you want to keep reading long after the book has been read in its entirety. It's a heartfelt story with many twists an This was the only book my Father ever gave me. Dad was 61 years young when I was born so he was well acquainted with the older classics. When I first received this book, I laid it down and didn't go back to it for a couple of years. The first part of the book seemed to start "slow" for me. By the time I was finished, I didn't want to be finished! I love books like this that make you want to keep reading long after the book has been read in its entirety. It's a heartfelt story with many twists and turns on the "road to life". I loved it when I was able to visit the actual area where this occurred and see the cabins of the folks that this was about. Thanks to this book, Harold Bell Wright has become my favorite author. I own most of his books with the exception of one which is just to expensive for my collection. I'll have to get one of the later editions of the book. I highly recommend this book. I will not share the exact plot as there is much that has been written about this book. Suffice it to say, it is my favorite book other than the Bible.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    {3.5 stars} Although sometimes I was a little confused with the events throughout this book, I liked that the writing wasn't as in depth as other classics I've read. All the characters were riveting, but I especially liked Sammy, Young Matt (especially how protective he was of Sammy...and just his honourable attitude in general), Pete (*sniff*), and Mr. Howitt. There were a few surprises along the way that I found intriguing. The Christianity in this wasn't what I expected--it's more of a social g {3.5 stars} Although sometimes I was a little confused with the events throughout this book, I liked that the writing wasn't as in depth as other classics I've read. All the characters were riveting, but I especially liked Sammy, Young Matt (especially how protective he was of Sammy...and just his honourable attitude in general), Pete (*sniff*), and Mr. Howitt. There were a few surprises along the way that I found intriguing. The Christianity in this wasn't what I expected--it's more of a social gospel than a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. At least it had that feel, but when God or Christianity was referenced it was in depth and worthwhile. I thought it slightly strange that the preacher was mentioned on several occasions at the beginning of the chapter, but never appears as part of the story. I would recommend this to classic lovers. *Several swear words throughout.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    Some how I ended up with two copies of The Shepherd of the Hills by Harold Bell Wright, a story that has become an outdoor play in Branson Missouri. It was also a John Wayne film (1941). It was apparently the first book in the United States to sell one million copies. Despite all that praise, I wasn't able to finish it. The novel set in the Ozarks has a similar set up to Lorna Doone by R. D. Blackmore. There is an orphan boy with a long dark history. Now though an old man, known as the Shepherd h Some how I ended up with two copies of The Shepherd of the Hills by Harold Bell Wright, a story that has become an outdoor play in Branson Missouri. It was also a John Wayne film (1941). It was apparently the first book in the United States to sell one million copies. Despite all that praise, I wasn't able to finish it. The novel set in the Ozarks has a similar set up to Lorna Doone by R. D. Blackmore. There is an orphan boy with a long dark history. Now though an old man, known as the Shepherd has come to ask questions and stir up painful memories. All of this though is told through a heavy Ozark dialect and purposely vague plot progression. While the goal may be to set the scene and keep the reader guessing, it turned me off completely. After two attempts I didn't make it past about page 50.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kettie

    I got tired of reading about "giants" - there are 3 in the book and he doesn't know how else to describe them. "Young giant" is about as far as he modifies it. Manly men have to be big, anyone small is weak. Unless you're a woman and this story happens to have the loveliest little heroine anyone has ever seen. If you're from the city, you're less of a person than if you're from the hills. As far as it being a great depiction of the Ozarks, could've been the Allegheny, Adirondacks, or Appalachain I got tired of reading about "giants" - there are 3 in the book and he doesn't know how else to describe them. "Young giant" is about as far as he modifies it. Manly men have to be big, anyone small is weak. Unless you're a woman and this story happens to have the loveliest little heroine anyone has ever seen. If you're from the city, you're less of a person than if you're from the hills. As far as it being a great depiction of the Ozarks, could've been the Allegheny, Adirondacks, or Appalachain Mountains and I don't think it would have mattered. Seems to be a fairly mediocre book and I'm not sure why it's survived this long. I don't recommend it unless you get a kick out of reading sappy writing. I have to admit I actually laughed out loud twice. "What a man!"

  26. 5 out of 5

    Iris Eng

    My birth Father was 61 years young when I was born. He sang to me while I set on his knee. He took me fishing and to his Barber Shop. There were a few books he HIGHLY endorsed and REALLY wanted me to read. This was one of them. It is a GREAT book based on a historical account. "Old Matt and Aunt Mollie's" cabin is still standing in the Ozarks. Lookout point is there. They have statues of Pete and other characters. There is also a play that is performed in the Amphitheater every summer based on t My birth Father was 61 years young when I was born. He sang to me while I set on his knee. He took me fishing and to his Barber Shop. There were a few books he HIGHLY endorsed and REALLY wanted me to read. This was one of them. It is a GREAT book based on a historical account. "Old Matt and Aunt Mollie's" cabin is still standing in the Ozarks. Lookout point is there. They have statues of Pete and other characters. There is also a play that is performed in the Amphitheater every summer based on this play. Most of the cast members are "hill folk". This has always been my favorite book just because there are not others that can hold a candle to this one's true fascinating historical account. I encourage you to check it out today!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Comfort read with a twist of an ending. Harold Bell Wright began visiting the Ozark Mountains in southern Missouri and northern Arkansas in 1898 at the bidding of his physician who recommended two vacations a year in a more suitable climate for health reasons. In following his doctor's advice, he became acquainted with John and Anna Ross, known locally as Old Matt and Aunt Mollie. The people he encountered during his eight summers spent camping on the Rosses' land were the inspirations for his c Comfort read with a twist of an ending. Harold Bell Wright began visiting the Ozark Mountains in southern Missouri and northern Arkansas in 1898 at the bidding of his physician who recommended two vacations a year in a more suitable climate for health reasons. In following his doctor's advice, he became acquainted with John and Anna Ross, known locally as Old Matt and Aunt Mollie. The people he encountered during his eight summers spent camping on the Rosses' land were the inspirations for his characters in this book published in 1907.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    This story, written over a hundred years ago, is different than I had imagined before picking it up, but what a beautiful story. It takes place in the Ozarks and the author convincingly transports us there. I loved getting to know the characters and their relationships. There were good lessons to be learned.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine Shadows

    This is a book that I have read more times than I can remember. This was the first one that I was introduced too by this author, and it was given to me by my grandfather. It happens to be a favorite of mine, as it was my grandfather's. In fact, I have several of Harold Bell Wright's books. I collect antique books, and enjoy scouring antique malls in search of them. Harold Bell Wright and Gene Stratton Porter are the two authors I search for most frequently outside of the classics. This book is a This is a book that I have read more times than I can remember. This was the first one that I was introduced too by this author, and it was given to me by my grandfather. It happens to be a favorite of mine, as it was my grandfather's. In fact, I have several of Harold Bell Wright's books. I collect antique books, and enjoy scouring antique malls in search of them. Harold Bell Wright and Gene Stratton Porter are the two authors I search for most frequently outside of the classics. This book is a beautiful story of forgiveness. It also has some very sad and tragic portions that shows some very real life truths. "Dad" Howitt, is one of my favorite characters of the fiction world. He has a sad past and a secret. He tries to live as a hermit, but the people are drawn to him for his kindness. He becomes an awesome mentor, and you can only do that when you have been through it. There is a sweetness and peacefulness about this book that is so enjoyable. The setting of this book is the Ozarks, and sometimes you will encounter the language of the Ozarks, but it is a thing of beauty as you get into the story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I think I would have enjoyed this book more if I hadn’t read it over such a spread out period of time; however, it was a really good story. I’ll have to read it again sometime.

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