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Delphi Complete Works of Strabo - Geography (Illustrated) (Delphi Ancient Classics Book 61)

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An Asiatic Greek in the time of Augustus, Strabo was a keen voyager that explored the four corners of the ancient world and compiled an important ‘Geography’ in seventeen books on his travels. Offering a window into the lost world of classical Rome and Greece, Strabo’s ‘Geography’ is a major source for the study of ancient geography, while providing important information o An Asiatic Greek in the time of Augustus, Strabo was a keen voyager that explored the four corners of the ancient world and compiled an important ‘Geography’ in seventeen books on his travels. Offering a window into the lost world of classical Rome and Greece, Strabo’s ‘Geography’ is a major source for the study of ancient geography, while providing important information on Greek cultic history and early theories of the nature of the world. Delphi’s Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Greek texts. This comprehensive eBook presents Strabo’s complete extant ‘Geography’, with beautiful illustrations, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1) * Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Strabo's life and ‘Geography’ * Features the complete extant works of Strabo, in both English translation and the original Greek * Concise introduction to the ‘Geography’ * Includes H. C. Hamilton and W. Falconer’s translation previously appearing in Bohn Classical Library edition of Strabo * Excellent formatting of the texts * Easily locate the sections you want to read with individual contents tables * Provides a special dual English and Greek text, allowing readers to compare the sections paragraph by paragraph – ideal for students * Features a bonus biography – discover Strabo's ancient world * Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to explore our range of Ancient Classics titles or buy the entire series as a Super Set CONTENTS: The Translation THE GEOGRAPHY The Greek Text CONTENTS OF THE GREEK TEXT The Dual Text DUAL GREEK AND ENGLISH TEXT The Biography INTRODUCTION TO STRABO by Horace Leonard Jones Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles


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An Asiatic Greek in the time of Augustus, Strabo was a keen voyager that explored the four corners of the ancient world and compiled an important ‘Geography’ in seventeen books on his travels. Offering a window into the lost world of classical Rome and Greece, Strabo’s ‘Geography’ is a major source for the study of ancient geography, while providing important information o An Asiatic Greek in the time of Augustus, Strabo was a keen voyager that explored the four corners of the ancient world and compiled an important ‘Geography’ in seventeen books on his travels. Offering a window into the lost world of classical Rome and Greece, Strabo’s ‘Geography’ is a major source for the study of ancient geography, while providing important information on Greek cultic history and early theories of the nature of the world. Delphi’s Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Greek texts. This comprehensive eBook presents Strabo’s complete extant ‘Geography’, with beautiful illustrations, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1) * Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Strabo's life and ‘Geography’ * Features the complete extant works of Strabo, in both English translation and the original Greek * Concise introduction to the ‘Geography’ * Includes H. C. Hamilton and W. Falconer’s translation previously appearing in Bohn Classical Library edition of Strabo * Excellent formatting of the texts * Easily locate the sections you want to read with individual contents tables * Provides a special dual English and Greek text, allowing readers to compare the sections paragraph by paragraph – ideal for students * Features a bonus biography – discover Strabo's ancient world * Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to explore our range of Ancient Classics titles or buy the entire series as a Super Set CONTENTS: The Translation THE GEOGRAPHY The Greek Text CONTENTS OF THE GREEK TEXT The Dual Text DUAL GREEK AND ENGLISH TEXT The Biography INTRODUCTION TO STRABO by Horace Leonard Jones Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles

30 review for Delphi Complete Works of Strabo - Geography (Illustrated) (Delphi Ancient Classics Book 61)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Markus

    Strabo (63 BC – 23 AD) Geographica (3rd edition 2017- German translation by A. Forbiger) This edition is a treasure trove for scholars in Ancient Greek handwriting, provided with extensive footnotes. Strabo was a Greek philosopher, historian and geologist. He travelled extensively, as he says: "Westward I have journeyed to the parts of Etruria opposite Sardinia; towards the south from the Euxine to the borders of Ethiopia; and perhaps not one of those who have written geographies has visited more pl Strabo (63 BC – 23 AD) Geographica (3rd edition 2017- German translation by A. Forbiger) This edition is a treasure trove for scholars in Ancient Greek handwriting, provided with extensive footnotes. Strabo was a Greek philosopher, historian and geologist. He travelled extensively, as he says: "Westward I have journeyed to the parts of Etruria opposite Sardinia; towards the south from the Euxine to the borders of Ethiopia; and perhaps not one of those who have written geographies has visited more places than I have between those limits." He also spent much time in the famous library in Alexandria taking notes from "the works of his predecessors" and made use of ancient writings, always faithfully mentioning origin and author. Book 1: Justification and intent of the author’s work. Strabo requests his future readers to be philosophers with good knowledge of ancient literature and geography. His geography came to reach back in time to the Trojan war, to Homer, Hesiod and other poets of early written history. In Strabo’s time, the earth's shape as a globe was well established. However, it was believed the Universe and the Sun were rotating around the motionless earth. Book 2: A world map from the author's era was rectangular. From Iberia (Spain) and the Columns of Hercules (Gibraltar) as the Western border, it reaches as far as India in the East. Thule (Iceland) is the most northern point known and to the South it is beyond the Libyan deserts that the world ends in the outer Atlantic Ocean in the south. In Strabo’s mind: “The Geologist only researches the inhabited part of the world.” Book 3: Spain. The author proceeds with the journey in clockwise order, starting at the far western point the “Pillars of Hercules” near Gibraltar and then Iberia (Spain). Descriptions of Bätica, Turdetania.Lusitania, Tha Balearic islands. Book 4: Gallia. His geography of Gallia has relatively few historical inputs, but he refers to some geography found in Julius Caesar’s ‘Gallic Wars’. A special description of Narbonensis and Aquitania. Gallica Belgica. Special notes on Brittanica and Thule (Island). Book 5: Italy as per Strabo’s time but with a start in history and evolution from a modest beginning as Latium, Sabinum, origins of Rome. Book 6: Lukanium, Bruttium; inner Greek countries. Book 7: Germany; On one side of the Rhine dwell the Gallic and toward the East are the Germans who are little different from the Gallic; physically as well as in their lifestyle; therefore, I think the Romans give them the name Germans, as in the Latin language Germani means ‘The same’… Book 8: Hellas; Geography from ancient legends, mythology, poetry and history as they were commented on by Homer and other poets as well as rich information from ancient philosophers, travellers, sailors and explorers. Describing historical events many ancient authors have some geography into their works, like Ephoros and Polybios, others like Poseidoneios and Hipparchos in their physics and mathematics. These are easy to evaluate, but with Homer, we go into more details, as the poet has often described geography in poetical ways and did not speak from present time places but from ancient ones, which time has altered or destroyed. Book 9: Megaris, Attika, Salamis. Böotia, Thessalia, Book 10: Euböa. Aitolia, Arkania, legends about the sects of the Curetes, description of Creta, islands of Cyclades and Sporades, Book 11: Asia. North of the Caucasian mountain ridge. Lake Meiotic, Pontos Euxeinos, Colchis, Iberia, Albania, Caspian Sea, Parthia, Media. Tauros, Euphrat, Tigris, Armenia. Book 12: Cappadocia. Kingdom of Pontos, Bithynia, Galatia, Mysia, Phrygia Book 13: Troas, the homeland of the Iliad is mentioned with large inserts from the poem by Homer. Book 14: Ionia. From Erythrai was Sybillah, the wise and holy woman telling prophecies in ancient times. Book 15: India is the part of the world, where Strabo uses large portions of reports written by philosophers taking part in Alexander’s Eastern exploration and submission conquest. No other Greek nor Roman had ever come this far to the east. The most unbelievable and fantastic stories were told. Strabo tries to consolidate the tales and legends dating from Herkules, Dyonisos, Kyros, Semiramis, up to more credible historians, like Eratosthenes, Onesikritos, Nearchos, Aristobulus. The size of India is said to be larger than the whole of Europe, from the Caucasus to the plains of the southern seashores, the largest rivers ever seen, over five thousand cities, peaceful populations, ruled by kings or holy men; seemingly endless rainy seasons flooding low countries; unknown food and wildlife; rich cultural traditions; abundance of gold, silver and precious stones. Book 16: Assyria, Babylonia, Mesopotamia. Syria, Phoenicia, Judäas. Strabo is mentioning Moses as an Aegyptian priest, a religion (Christian) that had a good beginning but ended badly. Book 17: Egypt, Strabo is mentioning his personal visit and experience in Aegypt. Ethiopia, and Libya. Description of Lybia, Mauretania, Numidia, Karthagho, Kyrene. My view of Strabo’s work. I had not intended to repeat the headers of the 17 books, but it seems the only way to prepare a future reader for the special order by which the author presents his geography. Strabo’s writing style evolves for the better book after book. He may have spent decades preparing and produce them. In addition to geographical details, he provides rich information about the population in every country, their lifestyles, languages, physical appearance, clothing, food resources, agricultural and fishing, cultural traditions etc. Bounties of nuggets of historical treasures are revealed, sometimes rare or even unique. Indeed, the author was right to have some pre-requests for his readers if they want to get the most profit from it. Ancient Greek authors, like Homer’s Iliad, Hesiod’s Works and Days, Apollonius’ Argonautica, Pausanias works, Herodotus, Pindar’s poetry, Xenophon. Latin authors like Julius Caesar, Sallust, Velleius Paterculus, A.Florus, Caton, Tacitus, Lucan, Seneca, Plutarque, and others. All this literature will appear in some place or other in Strabo’s work and will make the reader feel at home, and make this book, after a difficult beginning an incredibly enjoyable reading experience. In the end, I would have liked it to continue.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Casebolt

    Strabo intended his “Geography” to be a handbook for leaders of the early Roman Empire as well a contribution to scholarship in its own right. He often presents a bewildering cascade of names and places, but just as often folds in fascinating cultural, historical, and mythological insights and speculations. His work is a landmark achievement and an intriguing snapshot of an ancient world which no longer exists, but which was every bit as complex and colorful as our own.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    A dry read end-to-end, but invaluable for getting a sense of what the early Roman Empire knew about the world. The translation is clear (I cannot judge its faithfulness), and the work is heavily footnoted.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    A fun read, though I did skim a bunch in the middle. I made many highlights for future reference. I will say it was a pleasure in that I would consult Greek, Latin and English versions of the Iliad & Odyssey when Strabo referenced them. Classicist fun!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kus

    Sey, mungkin lain kali saja. Berat >_

  6. 5 out of 5

    İzzet Erten

    Kitap kısa bölüm açıklamaları ve dipnotlar ile çok daha zengin düzenlenebilirdi. Fotolar haritalar eklenebilirdi. Bence çeviri biraz heba olmuş.

  7. 4 out of 5

    William Elliott

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mamo

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hamish Cameron

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ebru Erbaş

  12. 4 out of 5

    PLVS OVLTRE

  13. 5 out of 5

    Seán Kane

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ahmet Acar

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ole Andreas Haug

  16. 5 out of 5

    Paul Mamani

  17. 5 out of 5

    BOB FLORIG

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chris James

  19. 5 out of 5

    Doğaç Sencer

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pınar

  21. 5 out of 5

    Roberto Yoed

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nils

  23. 4 out of 5

    marc rodriguez

  24. 4 out of 5

    Irene

  25. 4 out of 5

    Мирослав Сарић

  26. 4 out of 5

    burcu okay

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nils

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jindřich Zapletal

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nehirin~

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eugene booker

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