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The Selected Works of Edgar Allan Poe (Collins Classics)

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HarperCollins is proud to present its new range of best-loved, essential classics. ‘True! Nervous, very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad? The disease had sharpened my senses, not destroyed, not dulled them.’ This ultimate collection of the infamous author’s works includes ‘The Raven’, ‘The Fall of the House of Usher’ and ‘The Tel HarperCollins is proud to present its new range of best-loved, essential classics. ‘True! Nervous, very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad? The disease had sharpened my senses, not destroyed, not dulled them.’ This ultimate collection of the infamous author’s works includes ‘The Raven’, ‘The Fall of the House of Usher’ and ‘The Tell-Tale Heart’. They focus on the internal conflict of individuals, the power of the dead over the living, and psychological explorations of darker human emotion. An American writer of fantastical, bizarre and sometimes disturbing short stories, Poe wrote in the first half of the nineteenth century. Preoccupied with delving into the darker reaches of the human psyche, Poe is inventor of the detective story and master of the macabre.


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HarperCollins is proud to present its new range of best-loved, essential classics. ‘True! Nervous, very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad? The disease had sharpened my senses, not destroyed, not dulled them.’ This ultimate collection of the infamous author’s works includes ‘The Raven’, ‘The Fall of the House of Usher’ and ‘The Tel HarperCollins is proud to present its new range of best-loved, essential classics. ‘True! Nervous, very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad? The disease had sharpened my senses, not destroyed, not dulled them.’ This ultimate collection of the infamous author’s works includes ‘The Raven’, ‘The Fall of the House of Usher’ and ‘The Tell-Tale Heart’. They focus on the internal conflict of individuals, the power of the dead over the living, and psychological explorations of darker human emotion. An American writer of fantastical, bizarre and sometimes disturbing short stories, Poe wrote in the first half of the nineteenth century. Preoccupied with delving into the darker reaches of the human psyche, Poe is inventor of the detective story and master of the macabre.

30 review for The Selected Works of Edgar Allan Poe (Collins Classics)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    This is masterful, original writing upon which several current genres are based.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Symanczyk

    Overall impression: The X-Files, 1840s-style. ;-) Also, 1840s fake news, detective fiction, cryptography... Poe was definitely writing at the cutting edge of a wide range of topics. Fun read, but a bit frustrating because this edition didn't offer translations of any of the French or Latin sprinkled liberally throughout Poe's writings, and omitted the (30+) footnotes on one of the stories. Overall impression: The X-Files, 1840s-style. ;-) Also, 1840s fake news, detective fiction, cryptography... Poe was definitely writing at the cutting edge of a wide range of topics. Fun read, but a bit frustrating because this edition didn't offer translations of any of the French or Latin sprinkled liberally throughout Poe's writings, and omitted the (30+) footnotes on one of the stories.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Kidd

    A collection of 19 of Poe’s most famous short stories from detective tales to the macabre. Somewhat anchored in their time and written in a style that demanded concentration to fully appreciate the narrative. Some tales have aged much better than others. I must confess I was somewhat relieved to fall over the finishing line for this collection. Some brief notes on the individual stories below: The Gold Bug - a short tale of uncovering pirate treasure which is most noticeable for its fascinating, A collection of 19 of Poe’s most famous short stories from detective tales to the macabre. Somewhat anchored in their time and written in a style that demanded concentration to fully appreciate the narrative. Some tales have aged much better than others. I must confess I was somewhat relieved to fall over the finishing line for this collection. Some brief notes on the individual stories below: The Gold Bug - a short tale of uncovering pirate treasure which is most noticeable for its fascinating, given the time this was written, introduction to the basics of cryptography. The Balloon Hoax - interestingly this tale of crossing the Atlantic via balloon really was a hoax created by Poe which apparently did fool the New York Sun in 1844. Also interesting to note that this feat was actually only achieved via a helium balloon in 1978 and took a 137 hours much slower than Poe’s 75 hour fictional journey. The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar - a rather macabre tale of experimenting with hypnosis to delay an encroaching death. MS. Found in a Bottle - our unnamed composer of the message finds himself through misfortune trapped on a strange ghost like ship which rushes ever southward to its terrifying terminus. Inspired by Mercator’s (famed for the Mercator projection of many maps still in use today) early maps in the sixteenth century where Mercator draws the Arctic as four large chunks separated by channels of flowing water, which meet in the middle in a giant whirlpool. "Without cease, it is carried northward, there being absorbed into the bowels of the Earth," Mercator wrote on his original map. The Black Cat - another macabre tale of the descent into violence and rage due to alcoholism. The Fall of the House of Usher - a gothic tale of a malevolent house and mental illness. The Pit and the Pendulum - recounts the torments endured by a prisoner of the Spanish Inquisition. The Cask of Amontillado - for some unnamed slight the narrator seeks to carry out a horrifying act of revenge on an unwitting friend. The Imp of the Perverse - we sometimes perpetrate acts merely because we feel we should not. Beyond or behind this there is no intelligible principle. From this premise our condemned narrator reveals how he was compelled to confess to what was otherwise a perfect murder. The Tell-Tale Heart - the imagined beating of a dismembered heart impels our narrator to confess his hideous crime. William Wilson - a sustained character study of the doppelgänger- the inspiration for Fight Club? The Murders in the Rue Morgue - the first modern detective story. A Holmes and Watson like duo solve a mystifying and particularly brutal murder in Paris. The Purloined Letter - another detective story exploring the concept of hiding in plain sight. The Oblong Box - our narrator mistakenly interprets the contents of an oblong box during a long sea journey. How to write a Blackwood Article - a satirical take on the formulaic gothic style prevalent at the time. I’m sure much more humorous at the timing of writing within the broader context of the time. The Thousand and Second Tale of Scheherazade - its Poe... as you may expect the 1002nd night doesn’t end well for our famous narrator. The Duc De L’Omelette - this may have made sense 150 years ago but has not aged well. Ostensibly about a rich man who dies and finds himself in hell whereby he cheats the devil in a game of cards to escape damnation. This was largely impenetrable and completely forgettable. Three Sundays in a Week - an interesting tale of a grumpy uncle who refuses to give his blessings to a union until there are three Sundays in a week. A seemingly impossible hurdle overcome by two sailors travelling in opposite directions around the world. The Raven - Poe’s most famous poem. Quoth the raven “Nevermore”.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Yevgeniy Brikman

    Some of the stories are brilliant and memorable: - The Pit and the Pendulum: amazing short story of a prisoner of the Spanish Inquisition waking up in a torture chamber. The image of the pendulum sears itself into your mind. - The Cask of Amontillado: famous tale of murder, told from the perspective of the murderer. I read this many years ago, and it made a massive impression, so coming back to read it while going through this book, I was startled to find just how short the story is—less than 10 p Some of the stories are brilliant and memorable: - The Pit and the Pendulum: amazing short story of a prisoner of the Spanish Inquisition waking up in a torture chamber. The image of the pendulum sears itself into your mind. - The Cask of Amontillado: famous tale of murder, told from the perspective of the murderer. I read this many years ago, and it made a massive impression, so coming back to read it while going through this book, I was startled to find just how short the story is—less than 10 pages. It definitely punches above its weight! - The Tell-Tale Heart: another classic tale of murder from the perspective of the murderer. This one clocks in at less than 8 pages, but the insanity of the (unreliable) narrator will stick with you for a long time. - The Murders in the Rue Morgue: one of the pioneering stories of detective fiction. The structure and pacing of this story is very poor, and it's nowhere near as readable as later detective stories such as Sherlock Holmes and Poirot, but the influence on those later stories is clear, with Dupin solving a tangled mystery using solely observation, logic, and deduction. - The Purloined Letter: this is a far better mystery story from Poe that is much more readable and enjoyable than The Murders in the Rue Morgue. It has almost all the elements of a Sherlock Homes or Poirot story—something valuable stolen from the royal family, a somewhat inept police officer coming to a detective for help, the use of observation, logic, and deduction to solve the case, and so on—but predates these more famous detective stories by 50+ years. - The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar: a creepy short horror story. It doesn't feel that scary by today's standards, but I can't help but think this had to influence future writers, including HP Lovecraft. - The Raven: a beautiful poem with an amazing style, haunting rhythm, and dark themes. I must credit the Simpsons for introducing me to this poem years ago. It reads even better in the original :) The variety of these stories, and the influence they had, is impressive, and for these alone this book, or more accurately, Edgar Allen Poe, is well worth reading. However, I must also admit that a number of the stories were either unimpressive, or only made sense with a bunch of additional context, which this book failed to provide. Examples: - The Balloon Hoax: this turned out to be a bit a prank article Poe published. The book didn't explain this at all, and without that context, it just reads like a crappy, overly-detailed short story. - How to Write a Blackwood Article: this is a mock, sarcastic "how to" guide, that, I think, was supposed to make fun of short stories published in The Blackwood. Let's just say the jokes don't exactly survive well to modern times. - The Duc de L'Omelette: I think this was supposed to be a humorous work on a Duc dying and going to hell... But the writing is confusing, half the story is in French (which is a bit frustrating if you don't happen to know French), and much of the humor is from the fact that this is a satire of some contemporary of Poe's, so it doesn't really work in the modern day. I guess you had to be there. In short, there are some extraordinary works from Poe here, but also some pieces that are best skipped.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ely

    I was a little disappointed by this—I'd expected to love these stories. I think that I'm much more interested by Poe's poetry so I'm going to be sticking to that. I was a little disappointed by this—I'd expected to love these stories. I think that I'm much more interested by Poe's poetry so I'm going to be sticking to that.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Patience Perry

    Poe will always be Poe. You either love him or hate him. I, For one, love him. I enjoy reading all the selected poems and the short stories.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ian Casey

    (Note: there is a printing error in this edition. The tale 'Bon-Bon' follows immediately on from 'Why the Little Frenchman Wears His Hand in a Sling' on page 568 but does not have a separate title heading, nor does it appear on the table of contents.) Edgar Allan Poe is five stars by default, so rating his books is more a matter of the qualities of the individual edition itself. This 2011 Collins edition of 'The Selected Works' is an excellent one, and perhaps the best compromise which exists for (Note: there is a printing error in this edition. The tale 'Bon-Bon' follows immediately on from 'Why the Little Frenchman Wears His Hand in a Sling' on page 568 but does not have a separate title heading, nor does it appear on the table of contents.) Edgar Allan Poe is five stars by default, so rating his books is more a matter of the qualities of the individual edition itself. This 2011 Collins edition of 'The Selected Works' is an excellent one, and perhaps the best compromise which exists for a 'portable' edition. That is to say that whilst there are plenty of nifty 'complete' editions of Poe around - including the Barnes & Noble version which they reissue with new cover art every few years - these are not the most practical items to read, let alone with which to travel. This Collins however is compact enough for travel and for comfortable reading, without stinting on tangible aspects or content. We have here 69 works in all, including all the short prose fiction, with the only exception I've found in my research being 'The Literary Life of Thingum Bob, Esq.' Possibly it was considered a mite too long. We have also a few of his essays. His poetry is absent other than 'The Raven' as an obligatory bookend. But given that his poetry is easily attainable elsewhere, as are his longer works such as 'Eureka: A Prose Poem' and 'The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket', it is as I say an excellent compromise. One need not expect anything in the way of embellishment, though, so this is not an edition for those seeking annotations and the like. As for the tangible aspects, this is perhaps the most beautiful 'reading copy' of a book one could hope for (that is, as opposed to a collector's item). The hardcover's dust jacket is a strikingly brilliant red with tastefully minimal use of text, font, and an image of the raven. The black bookmark is not deluxe by any means but is a nice touch and rarely to be expected in editions of broadly comparable kind. Briefly, some superfluous thoughts on the text. Masterful though Poe was as a disciple of the Gothic and a trailblazer for the examination of the human psyche within fiction, he was so much more. An accomplished humorist with a wicked wit. A pioneer of science fiction, and of detective fiction in the modern sense (this some half a century before Wells and Doyle). An enthusiast of cryptography. A purveyor of adventure yarns. An entertainingly opinionated essayist. In short, Poe sits comfortably within the English literary pantheon not only by virtue of the peaks he attained but also of the breadth of ground he made his own. p.s. This is the hundredth book I've finished and reviewed since joining Goodreads! Go me!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    By far my favorite aspect of Poe's writing was his ability to paint pictures in my mind. In my personal favorites, The Facts in the case of M. Valdemar, The Black Cat and The Raven all used imagery to tell the story. For example, M. Valdemar says that he is dead even though he is speaking but we know he is telling the truth because of his description in addition to the conclusions made by the nurses in the room. So, if you like creepy atmospheres and strong descriptions, I would highly recommend By far my favorite aspect of Poe's writing was his ability to paint pictures in my mind. In my personal favorites, The Facts in the case of M. Valdemar, The Black Cat and The Raven all used imagery to tell the story. For example, M. Valdemar says that he is dead even though he is speaking but we know he is telling the truth because of his description in addition to the conclusions made by the nurses in the room. So, if you like creepy atmospheres and strong descriptions, I would highly recommend reading some works by Edgar Allan Poe.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Facundo Martin

    This review is just a hodgepodge of private notes, though anyone's more than welcome to read it, point out mistakes or draw my attention to things overlooked. For the short stories: One of the most striking things about Poe is his versatility. He wrote satires, adventures, science fiction, horror tales, reflective pieces, philosophical speculations, detective fiction.... Berenice, Morella and Ligeia contain most of what makes up Poe's brand of the macabre. Bon-Bon and Le Duc De l'Omelette are This review is just a hodgepodge of private notes, though anyone's more than welcome to read it, point out mistakes or draw my attention to things overlooked. For the short stories: One of the most striking things about Poe is his versatility. He wrote satires, adventures, science fiction, horror tales, reflective pieces, philosophical speculations, detective fiction.... Berenice, Morella and Ligeia contain most of what makes up Poe's brand of the macabre. Bon-Bon and Le Duc De l'Omelette are curious gastrophilosophical satires; Shadow: A Parable and Silence: A Fable are essayesque. I personally loved How to Write a Blackwood Article and A Predicament: The Scythe of Time. Besides parodying exaggerated and unrealistic tales, I think they kind of foreshadow the media's obsession with extreme and graphic stuff. Another comedic piece that I really liked was Why the Little Frenchman Wears His Hand in a Sling. The Irish accent sure is stereotypical but it's also hilarious! The Pit and the Pendulum, The Tell-Tale Heart and The Black Cat have withstood the test of time and don't need an introduction. Same with The Fall of the House of Usher and The Cask of Amontillado (by the way, don't forget to check out Bradbury's Usher II after reading them!). And The Gold-Bug, Poe's most widely read short story during his lifetime, probably makes it into this category too (it's surprisingly readable despite being about cryptography). I don't particularly like his tales of ''ratiocination'' (in decreasing order of quality: The Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Purloined letter and The Mystery of Marie Roget). He always has Dupin make some provocative claim like ''checkers requires more intelligence than chess'' (which is simply contentious), ''6 is the least likely outcome after two sixes in succession have been thrown at dice'' (which is just plain wrong; all rolls are independent) and that a boy could always win at the game of even and odd by outsmarting his opponents. This last one is the most interesting one and it assumes everything can be reduced to a linear chain of reasoning of the form ''he thinks I think he thinks I think he thinks I'm gonna say 'odd'. '' (Think Sherlock's Study in Pink, except that the cabbie was cheating.) The easiest way out would probably be to choose through a random device, and it's a fifty-fifty chance, as Sherlock said. I somehow get the impression Poe thought himself more clever than he really was -- but don't we all? The Masque of the Red Death and The Oval Portrait are kind of allegorical, and the latter deals with the question of art being a support system for life and this relationship getting distorted at times. The Premature Burial is like an essay by a fictional character dealing with one of Poe's favourite topics. Finally, I'm not sure what to call Some Words with a Mummy, maybe alternative history science fiction? At any rate, it's awesome! Honorable mentions: MS. Found in a Bottle, The Unparalleled Adventures of One Hans Pfaall, The Man That Was Used Up, William Wilson, The Conversation of Eiros and Charmion, A Tale of the Ragged Mountains, The Oblong Box, The Imp of the Pervese and X-ing a Paragrab. Most unexpected: The Domain of Arnheim and Landor's Cottage. The whole plot of both basically goes ''there was this beautiful house/garden--no, seriously it was really pretty and had colours and butterflies and shit. The end.'' I guess the guy needed a break after writing all the spooky stuff. As for Poe's only complete novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket: TL;DR, sorry Poe. For the poems: When I read The Raven as a kid I found it —I wouldn't say exactly chilling— but moving in some way. Now I can hardly see anything in it other than an extraordinarily accomplished piece of 'sound play'. You don't see trochaic octameter very often and Poe keeps it alive with subtle variations of rhythm, by docking final weak syllables to get single rhymes, etc. If we just take the first stanza, there are internal rhymes rhyming with the final word of the line before the ceasuras of lines 1 (dreary-weary) and 3 (napping-tapping), and two more fully internal pairs (napping-rapping and napping-tapping), one before and one after the ceasura, lock lines 3, 4 and 5 together; there's an (imperfect) eye rhyme 'weak'-'weary' and plenty of alliteration (though it's in stanza 3, I especially like this line: 'And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain'). Please don't tell me Poe didn't pick 'Lenore' just for the rhyme or I'll have to stare in awe at the freaky thing for hours.... I guess The Bells is made up of trochaic feet for the most part... but there's also something about the rhythm and the sounds that I can't quite figure out, something that compels you to raise or lower the volume of your voice when reading out loud, a cadence that works itself up to a resolution -halts- and strikes the bell again. If you stare at this one long enough, blocks of text start looking like bells...Is it a shape poem or am I just trippin'? xD And finally, I just love the flow of 'Annabel Lee' and 'For Annie'. Gotta love anapaests... As for the rest of the poems, I liked them but they didn't strike me as anything too special (though I might have to reread them sometime). Oh, and the obvious rhymes of the June-moon type certainly don't help...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Arrowsmith

    Some great stories but the choice of stories is a little odd. It omits greats like The Masque of the Red Death and has stories than go over the same ground, like Edgar was trying to improve on the first attempt. The Balloon Hoax and The Gold Bug are great adventures and creepy stories like The Imp of the Perverse are really inspired.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rylee

    though this book only includes a select few of Poe' s works, I enjoy it very much. I love his tales of the macabre and terror, and his poems give me chills. This is a good starter book to introduce yourself to the horror and macabre genre. though this book only includes a select few of Poe' s works, I enjoy it very much. I love his tales of the macabre and terror, and his poems give me chills. This is a good starter book to introduce yourself to the horror and macabre genre.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Laura Janosik

    Woe is me, Poe is not for me…

  13. 4 out of 5

    Val Pullin

    Huge collection of short stories from Edagr Allen Poe.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Louisa Keron

    Some were a little dull, but I absolutely loved others. I don't know why, but The Pit and the Pendulum has to be my favourite. Some were a little dull, but I absolutely loved others. I don't know why, but The Pit and the Pendulum has to be my favourite.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alia Brownhill

    I'm biased, and I really big EAP fan. His stories vary from the weird and kinda lame to the crazy and excellent. I will just forever recommend people read the first detective story published as well. I'm biased, and I really big EAP fan. His stories vary from the weird and kinda lame to the crazy and excellent. I will just forever recommend people read the first detective story published as well.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ana Mardoll

    Selected Works of Edgar Allan Poe / 0-517-05358-6 Odds are, you already know whether you like Poe or not, and if you're considering purchasing this volume, you would most benefit from a table of contents. Here is the list of all the included stories and poems included in this collection, listed in order of inclusion: MS. Found in a Bottle Berenice Morella Some Passages in the Life of a Lion The Unparalleled Adventures of One Hans Pfaall The Assignation Bon-Bon Shadow: A Parable Loss of Breath: A Tale Neit Selected Works of Edgar Allan Poe / 0-517-05358-6 Odds are, you already know whether you like Poe or not, and if you're considering purchasing this volume, you would most benefit from a table of contents. Here is the list of all the included stories and poems included in this collection, listed in order of inclusion: MS. Found in a Bottle Berenice Morella Some Passages in the Life of a Lion The Unparalleled Adventures of One Hans Pfaall The Assignation Bon-Bon Shadow: A Parable Loss of Breath: A Tale Neither In nor Out of "Blackwood" King Pest: A Tale Containing an Allegory Metzengerstein Le Duc De l'Omelette Four Beasts in One; The Homo-Cameleopard A Tale of Jerusalem Mystification Ligeia How to Write a Blackwood Article A Predicament: The Scythe of Time Silence: A Fable The Journal of Julius Rodman The Devil in the Belfry The Man That Was Used Up The Fall of the House of Usher William Wilson The Conversation of Eiros and Charmion Why the Little Frenchman Wears His Hand in a Sling The Business Man The Man in the Crowd The Murders in the Rue Morgue A Descent into the Maelstrom The Island of the Fay The Colloquy of Monos and Una Never Bet the Devil Your Head Three Sundays a Week Eleonora The Oval Portrait The Masque of the Red Death The Mystery of Marie Roget The Pit and the Pendulum The Tell-Tale Heart The Gold-Bug The Black Cat Diddling Considered as One of the Exact Sciences A Tale of the Ragged Mountains The Spectacles The Balloon-Hoax Mesmeric Revelation The Premature Burial The Oblong Box The Angel of the Odd Thou Art the Man The Purloined Letter The Literary Life of Thingum Bob, Esq. The Thousand-and-Second Tale of Scheherazade Some Words with a Mummy The Power of Words The Imp of the Perverse The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar The System of Dr. Tarr and Prof. Fether The Sphinx The Cask of Amontillado The Domain of Arnheim Mellonta Tauta Hop-Frog X-ing a Paragrab Von Kempelen and His Discovery Landor's Cottage The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket The Raven The Bells Annabel Lee Lenore Eulalie - A Song To Helen A Dream Within a Dream Ulalume Sonnet - To Science Al Aaraaf To the River To My Mother The Lake - To - Catholic Hymn Stanzas Song Fairy-Land For Annie The Sleeper Bridal Ballad To M - To One in Paradise The Haunted Palace The City in the Sea To F-s S. O-d Dreams To F- Eldorado To M.L.S.- ~ Ana Mardoll

  17. 4 out of 5

    Madison

    Edgar Allan Poe's poems are dark, meaningful, usually depressing, and thought-provoking. You cannot read them without feeling as if you have just gotten a glimpse of his soul. Though some parts of his poetry were hard to understand, I was able to obtain enough understandable information from it and was I was still able to get the overall idea and feel of the poem. I really enjoyed his poems because each one told a story. All the poems that I have read just have a story behind them, and are craft Edgar Allan Poe's poems are dark, meaningful, usually depressing, and thought-provoking. You cannot read them without feeling as if you have just gotten a glimpse of his soul. Though some parts of his poetry were hard to understand, I was able to obtain enough understandable information from it and was I was still able to get the overall idea and feel of the poem. I really enjoyed his poems because each one told a story. All the poems that I have read just have a story behind them, and are crafted to make you think. His poems are also like this, but he literally tells a story in poetic form to give insight to the inspiration of it. Like I said about Jane Eyre, his works really have a Burton-esque overtone to them. They are dark, mystifying, oftentimes creepy, but overall thoughtful and full of a deeper meaning. I recommend this to those who are willing to let their brains be stretched to understand these writings, because they are truly interesting and I thoroughly enjoyed them. (Poems I read from this volume: The Raven, The Bells, Annabel Lee, Lenore, Eulalie-A Song, To Helen, A Dream Within a Dream, Ulalume, Sonnet- To Science, Al Aaraaf, To the River, To My Mother, To Helen, The Lake-To- Catholic Hymn, Stanzas, Song, Fairy-Land, The Sleeper, Bridal Ballad, To M---, To One in Paradise, The Haunted Palace, The City in the Sea, The Conqueror Worm, To F---s S. O---d, Dreams, To F---, Eldorado, To M.L.S.---)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aragorn

    Non dirò che Edgar Allan Poe è critico, poeta e narratore, e che nel narratore c'è un filosofo. Non dirò che Poe rappresenta pressochè da solo il movimento romantico dall'altra parte dell'Oceano. Non dirò che Poe , dal seno di un mondo ingordo, affamato di materia, si è lanciato nei sogni e che fu una protesta ammirevole. Non dirò che in Poe non ci sono piagnucolii snervanti, ma, ovunque e senza posa, l'infaticabile ardore teso all'Ideale. Non dirò della crudele sobrietà dei racconti di Poe. Non Non dirò che Edgar Allan Poe è critico, poeta e narratore, e che nel narratore c'è un filosofo. Non dirò che Poe rappresenta pressochè da solo il movimento romantico dall'altra parte dell'Oceano. Non dirò che Poe , dal seno di un mondo ingordo, affamato di materia, si è lanciato nei sogni e che fu una protesta ammirevole. Non dirò che in Poe non ci sono piagnucolii snervanti, ma, ovunque e senza posa, l'infaticabile ardore teso all'Ideale. Non dirò della crudele sobrietà dei racconti di Poe. Non dirò che i suoi racconti si basano su ragionamenti a volte ecessivamente sottili, altre oscuri e a tratti singolarmente audaci e che bisogna mettersi il cuore in pace e digerire la cosa com'è. Non dirò che Poe scrive in uno stile troppo al di sopra della massa. Non dirò che questo stile dei racconti è sempre serrato, concatenato. Non dirò che nelle poesie di Poe c'è, al massimo grado, l'amore del Bello e la conoscenza delle condizioni armoniche della Bellezza. Non dirò che le poesie di Poe sono profonde e spingono al pianto, che sono lavoratissime, trasparenti e perfette come un gioiello di cristallo, che hanno uno stile ammirevole, puro e bizzarro. Perchè non dirò tutto questo? Perchè lo ha già detto Baudelaire. Chiedete a lui...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Spencer Folkins

    Actual passage from the Bio at the first of this book: "In 1942, tuberculosis struck his wife Virginia, like so many others in his past, and in 1847 she died at age twenty-four". This, in my opinion, renders the biography completely unreliable and there absolutely cannot be any inaccuracies, typographical or otherwise, in the bio of any author, nonetheless one as influential and legendary as Poe. This was advertised as a good introduction to the works of the great "Master of Suspense" (I thought Actual passage from the Bio at the first of this book: "In 1942, tuberculosis struck his wife Virginia, like so many others in his past, and in 1847 she died at age twenty-four". This, in my opinion, renders the biography completely unreliable and there absolutely cannot be any inaccuracies, typographical or otherwise, in the bio of any author, nonetheless one as influential and legendary as Poe. This was advertised as a good introduction to the works of the great "Master of Suspense" (I thought that was supposed to be Hitchcock. I'd sooner and more accurately dub him as The Father of Gothic Horror). It is blatantly obvious that there was an error in the bio, any uneducated fool could point that out, but because I am not all too familiar with the works of Edgar and this book already held an inaccuracy within the first thirty pages, that leads me to wonder how credible the rest of the information contained in this book is. Including the work collected. Someone did not do their job well. Not recommended as an introductory vessel into the world of Poe.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jena

    The summer before my freshman year of high school, I eagerly awaited this book, which encompassed twenty-four Braille volumes. I had nothing to do except sit by the pool and read, my fourteen-year-old girl version of Heaven. As irony would have it, the book came in the mail on the first day of my freshman year, when Algebra, Physical Science, and American history beckoned me away. That's why it took five months to finish the book, but twenty-odd years later, I can still remember the haunting lyr The summer before my freshman year of high school, I eagerly awaited this book, which encompassed twenty-four Braille volumes. I had nothing to do except sit by the pool and read, my fourteen-year-old girl version of Heaven. As irony would have it, the book came in the mail on the first day of my freshman year, when Algebra, Physical Science, and American history beckoned me away. That's why it took five months to finish the book, but twenty-odd years later, I can still remember the haunting lyrical beauty of Poe's writing and his often-chilling choice of words. The stories and poems in this volume showcase all the facets of Edgar Alan Poe, and it's classic American literature at its best.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mario_Bambea

    Tutti i nostri orrori dentro Poe troviamo tutte le nostre paure, è l'autore che ha costruito l'immaginario comune di orrori, tenebre e morte. Non tutte le pagine sono di livello, spesso lo stile barocco e tardo-romantico può appesantire la lettura, ma rimane una sottile linea di inquietudine che ci entra dentro. Il meglio restano i racconti (la casa Usher, Ligeia, Eleonora, il gatto nero...), mentre il romanzo Gordon Pym è splendido nella prima parte, mentre si perde molto e soffre di anacronis Tutti i nostri orrori dentro Poe troviamo tutte le nostre paure, è l'autore che ha costruito l'immaginario comune di orrori, tenebre e morte. Non tutte le pagine sono di livello, spesso lo stile barocco e tardo-romantico può appesantire la lettura, ma rimane una sottile linea di inquietudine che ci entra dentro. Il meglio restano i racconti (la casa Usher, Ligeia, Eleonora, il gatto nero...), mentre il romanzo Gordon Pym è splendido nella prima parte, mentre si perde molto e soffre di anacronismo nel finale...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    Finished after reading the following poems: The Raven The Bells Annabel Lee Lenore Eulalie-A Song To Helen A Dream Within A Dream Ulalume Sonnet-To Science Al Aaraaf To the River To My Mother To Helen The Lake-To- Catholic Hymn Stanzas Song Fairy-Land For Annie The Sleeper Bridal Ballad To M- To One in Paradise The Haunted Place The City in the Sea The Conqueror Worm To F---------------s S. O---------------d Dreams To F--------------- Eldorado To M.L.S.---------------

  23. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    Who knew that Edgar Allen Poe wrote such delicious satire, as well as the thrillers and detective stories to which we are accustomed? Several of the stories in this collection run in the form of a good Mark Twain story, several are psychological studies (before psychology really took off), many are the dark thrillers, several are detective stories, and of course there is poetry. Such a great, multi-faceted writer.

  24. 5 out of 5

    The Bookshop Umina

    Our 13+ kids book club read this. We had a great discussion about Poe's writing, his importance to the emergence of detective stories and the gruesome nature of his crimes. The favourite pieces were The Raven, The Black Cat and The Tell-Tale Heart. We scored the collection: 6 / 9 / 7 / 8 / 7.5 / 8 / 8 / 8 Our 13+ kids book club read this. We had a great discussion about Poe's writing, his importance to the emergence of detective stories and the gruesome nature of his crimes. The favourite pieces were The Raven, The Black Cat and The Tell-Tale Heart. We scored the collection: 6 / 9 / 7 / 8 / 7.5 / 8 / 8 / 8

  25. 5 out of 5

    Melisa Blankenship

    I've read most of his stories and only a few of his poems. His stories are classics combining suspense, a macabre sense of justice and poetic story twists. Can be overwhelming if not mixed in with more encouraging literature, though. I've read most of his stories and only a few of his poems. His stories are classics combining suspense, a macabre sense of justice and poetic story twists. Can be overwhelming if not mixed in with more encouraging literature, though.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    I liked a lot of the short stories, but some of them were hard to get through. The Narrative of A. Gordon Pym was okay until the end, and some of the poetry was okay. If I were to rate my favorite short stories it would be a clear 5 stars, but overall the collection is a little weaker.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Silvia

    The best thing about this was 'The Raven' The best thing about this was 'The Raven'

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mina

    Love Poe.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Hunt

    Poetic and gruesome, I loved it!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bev

    Always a good read.

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