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The Co-Op's Got Bananas: A Memoir of Growing Up in the Post-War North

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Despite the struggle to make ends meet during the tough years of warfare in the 1940s and rationing persisting until the early 1950s, life could still be sweet. Especially if you were a young boy, playing football with your pals, saving up to go to the movies at the weekend, and being captivated by the latest escapade of Dick Barton on the radio. Chocolate might be scarce, Despite the struggle to make ends meet during the tough years of warfare in the 1940s and rationing persisting until the early 1950s, life could still be sweet. Especially if you were a young boy, playing football with your pals, saving up to go to the movies at the weekend, and being captivated by the latest escapade of Dick Barton on the radio. Chocolate might be scarce, and bananas would be a pipe dream, but you could still have fun. In an excellent social memoir from one of the UK's premier columnists over the past five decades, Hunter Davies captures this period beautifully. His memoir of growing up in post-war North of England from 1945 onwards, amid the immense damage wrought by the Second World War, and the dreariness of life on rationing, very little luxuries and an archaic educational system, should be one that will resonate with thousands of readers across Britain. In the same vein as Robert Douglas's Night Song of the Last Tram - A Glasgow Childhood and Alan Johnson's This Boy, Hunter's memories of a hard life laced with glorious moments of colour and emotion will certainly strike a vein with his generation.


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Despite the struggle to make ends meet during the tough years of warfare in the 1940s and rationing persisting until the early 1950s, life could still be sweet. Especially if you were a young boy, playing football with your pals, saving up to go to the movies at the weekend, and being captivated by the latest escapade of Dick Barton on the radio. Chocolate might be scarce, Despite the struggle to make ends meet during the tough years of warfare in the 1940s and rationing persisting until the early 1950s, life could still be sweet. Especially if you were a young boy, playing football with your pals, saving up to go to the movies at the weekend, and being captivated by the latest escapade of Dick Barton on the radio. Chocolate might be scarce, and bananas would be a pipe dream, but you could still have fun. In an excellent social memoir from one of the UK's premier columnists over the past five decades, Hunter Davies captures this period beautifully. His memoir of growing up in post-war North of England from 1945 onwards, amid the immense damage wrought by the Second World War, and the dreariness of life on rationing, very little luxuries and an archaic educational system, should be one that will resonate with thousands of readers across Britain. In the same vein as Robert Douglas's Night Song of the Last Tram - A Glasgow Childhood and Alan Johnson's This Boy, Hunter's memories of a hard life laced with glorious moments of colour and emotion will certainly strike a vein with his generation.

30 review for The Co-Op's Got Bananas: A Memoir of Growing Up in the Post-War North

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chrissie

    The British author and journalist Hunter Davies is here, at the age of eighty, looking back at his youth. The book ends in 1960 when he, at the age of twenty-four, marries Margaret Forster. Both became authors. Both came from working class families. Both got themselves educated with scholarships -- he at University College Durham, she at the University of Oxford. His parents’ first child, he was born in Johnstone, Scotland, not far from Glasgow. The year was 1936. Both of his parents were of Sco The British author and journalist Hunter Davies is here, at the age of eighty, looking back at his youth. The book ends in 1960 when he, at the age of twenty-four, marries Margaret Forster. Both became authors. Both came from working class families. Both got themselves educated with scholarships -- he at University College Durham, she at the University of Oxford. His parents’ first child, he was born in Johnstone, Scotland, not far from Glasgow. The year was 1936. Both of his parents were of Scottish heritage, and he sees himself as a Scott too. He grew up in the provincial towns Dumfries, Scotland, and Carlisle, right over the border in England. Margaret, two years younger, was born and grew up in Carlisle. In 2016, she died, and I wonder if this doesn’t at least partially explain why the author has now written / published this book. Hunter is the author of the only authorized biography of the Beatles: The Beatles. She, Margaret Forster, is the author of the 1965 novel Georgy Girl. Tell me, who doesn‘t remember both the film and the Seekers’s hit song Georgy Girl. These are the two we are reading about. OK, mostly about him but there is quite a bit about her too and you do get a feeling for what they shared, how they differed and their respective personalities. We follow Hunter’s school years at Creighton School and Carlisle Grammar School. His interest in football, his yearning for a green Raleigh bike and what it took to get it. Home life was difficult. His father had multiple sclerosis and was bedridden. Providing for four children was no easy task for his mother. We follow his studies and escapades at Durham. He worked as the editor for the school newspaper, Palatinate, good preparation for the career in journalism that followed. The book is written with humor. Subtle, tongue-in-cheek humor is found in many, many of the lines. Pay attention, if you don’t you will easily miss what is actually being said. The tone is often self-deprecating. The two work well together. Amusing, humble and not showy. The part I like least is when he speaks of his time working in London, where he came to have contact with celebrities, but this is short. The better sections are his growth into adulthood, his growing understanding of himself and why and how he came to be married to Margaret. She insisted for years she did not want to marry and she did not want to have kids, but she did get herself a diaphragm, quite unusual for an unmarried woman of those times. The book offers both humor and, in a more serious tone, speaks with honesty about his relationship with those of his family, of how he saw his mother and father as a child, as an adolescent and now as an elderly man. There is a balance of good and bad. His age has given him wisdom. What he is unsure of he puts before us as questions to consider. How do you relate to your parents when, as he has done, you have left their world behind? Was he at times ashamed of them? The book looks at what it was like to grow up in provincial northern Britain during and after the war. The book is not focused upon politics, but decisions made by the government in place certainly influenced everyday life. Rationing, blackout regulations, subsidies to the poor, housing, medical and educational reforms, all made an impact on his life and the lives of ordinary people. The audiobook is very well narrated by Cameron Stewart. Easy to follow, read at a good speed and not overdramatized. As I said, you have to listen to catch the underlying meaning and humor in the author’s words; none of this is smashed into your face. I have no complaints with the book. I suppose I didn’t give it more stars quite simply because Hunter’s life is not all that exceptional. I do think a person growing up after the war, in the 1950s and 1960s, will enjoy this and easily relate to what is said.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nigeyb

    Having thoroughly enjoyed A Life in the Day, the second part of Hunter Davies's autobiography back in 2018, I was keen to read its predecessor The Co-op's Got Bananas: A Memoir of Growing Up in the Post-War North I love autobiographies and Hunter Davies is a wonderful writer however this one felt far too detailed, and that detail is often quite mundane. Some aspects of growing up in the 1940s and 1950s were fascinating, a lot of it just seemed to labour the points. Perhaps I just wasn't in the moo Having thoroughly enjoyed A Life in the Day, the second part of Hunter Davies's autobiography back in 2018, I was keen to read its predecessor The Co-op's Got Bananas: A Memoir of Growing Up in the Post-War North I love autobiographies and Hunter Davies is a wonderful writer however this one felt far too detailed, and that detail is often quite mundane. Some aspects of growing up in the 1940s and 1950s were fascinating, a lot of it just seemed to labour the points. Perhaps I just wasn't in the mood however I have to confess that around the halfway stage I started to skip sections and was quite relieved when I'd finished. 3/5 Here's the blurb.... Despite the struggle to make ends meet during the tough years of warfare in the 1940s and rationing persisting until the early 1950s, life could still be sweet. Especially if you were a young boy, playing football with your pals, saving up to go to the movies at the weekend, and being captivated by the latest escapade of Dick Barton on the radio. Chocolate might be scarce, and bananas would be a pipe dream, but you could still have fun. In an excellent social memoir from one of the UK's premier columnists over the past five decades, Hunter Davies captures this period beautifully. His memoir of growing up in post-war North of England from 1945 onwards, amid the immense damage wrought by the Second World War, and the dreariness of life on rationing, very little luxuries and an archaic educational system, should be one that will resonate with thousands of readers across Britain. In the same vein as Robert Douglas's Night Song of the Last Tram - A Glasgow Childhood, Hunter's memories of a hard life laced with glorious moments of colour and emotion will certainly strike a vein with his generation.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Furniss

    A very entertaining, enjoyable and humorous memoir of Hunter Davies growing up after WW2 in the North of England.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Voirrey

    I really enjoyed Hunter Davies memories of his childhood, teens and early twenties. He was starting university months before I was born, and so he is 'not quite a contemporary', so part of the enjoyment was in sing what was similar in his early life and what was so very different. I also noticed a passing reference to someone who is well known, to me, as a local personality; I feel as if I should write to Hunter Davies saying 'Do you want to know what happened to TC?'! I really enjoyed Hunter Davies memories of his childhood, teens and early twenties. He was starting university months before I was born, and so he is 'not quite a contemporary', so part of the enjoyment was in sing what was similar in his early life and what was so very different. I also noticed a passing reference to someone who is well known, to me, as a local personality; I feel as if I should write to Hunter Davies saying 'Do you want to know what happened to TC?'!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elite Group

    An Account of Childhood Around World War II Hunter Davies is an eminent writer, journalist and broadcaster whose most well-known publication is probably the only authorised biography of The Beatles. The Co-Op’s Got Bananas is an account of Hunter Davies’ life until around the time of his marriage to Margaret, who incidentally died of cancer in February of this year. It is impossible for me to say whether I liked this book because there were many parallels with my own early life or because it was a An Account of Childhood Around World War II Hunter Davies is an eminent writer, journalist and broadcaster whose most well-known publication is probably the only authorised biography of The Beatles. The Co-Op’s Got Bananas is an account of Hunter Davies’ life until around the time of his marriage to Margaret, who incidentally died of cancer in February of this year. It is impossible for me to say whether I liked this book because there were many parallels with my own early life or because it was a well written, finely observed history of those times. Probably a bit of both. The 50s in particular are often portrayed as being a time of rationing and deprivation but the author makes it abundantly clear that as a child those things didn’t matter as children had freedom to roam and time to do so in the absence of social media and television. It is only with hindsight that Hunter Davies realises that his mother worked tirelessly to bring up four young children, particularly as his father was bedridden with MS. It is not a book with deep meanings but it does accurately reflect the times and in particular gives a wonderful insight into the way the press works and how newspapers at that time were printed. It is also a book about class and the social system of the time which hasn’t yet quite disappeared. Although there are a few confessions along the way I never felt that I really got to know the author’s innermost thoughts but maybe I had no right to do so but I somehow resented that and was expecting a little more than I was presented with. I also felt that the random mention on three or four occasions of Paul McCartney and John Lennon was totally out of place; didn’t add anything and was tantamount to name dropping. I believe that anyone reading the book will get something from it although I feel that those of more advanced years may get more from it than others. After all it is a stroll down memory lane and what a stroll that can be. mr zorg Breakaway Reviewers received a copy of the book to review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Colin Lawrence

    Hunter Davies never disappoints, whether it's when he's writing his entertaining and self-deprecating articles in The Sunday Times or in this case a partial autobiography of his life from his childhood in the North West through his marriage to the late Margaret Forster in 1960. I'm about ten years younger than Mr Davies, but his recollections of growing up in Post-war Britain in the 1940s and 50s rang a lot of bells with me. It's surprising how much one forgets about the austere conditions that Hunter Davies never disappoints, whether it's when he's writing his entertaining and self-deprecating articles in The Sunday Times or in this case a partial autobiography of his life from his childhood in the North West through his marriage to the late Margaret Forster in 1960. I'm about ten years younger than Mr Davies, but his recollections of growing up in Post-war Britain in the 1940s and 50s rang a lot of bells with me. It's surprising how much one forgets about the austere conditions that prevailed during that period. Hunter Davies brings those memories vividly to life in all their glory and in many cases ignominy. He draws incredibly detailed pictures of all manner of things from the education system to the very social fabric of the country during the years following the Second World War through to the beginning of what people have dubbed the Swinging Sixties. He points out, quite correctly that those who say that if you remember the Sixties you weren't there, assuming that everyone was stoned out of their minds, when nothing could be further from the truth. This is no cosy walk down memory lane, it's much more than that. I found it thoroughly engrossing and entertaining and, even if you're not as old as Mr Hunter (or me) read this book - you won't regret it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Penny

    'Back when I were a nipper oop North' memoirs are ten a penny, but I knew Hunter Davies wouldn't let me down. Davies has an easy, almost conversational style of writing. He's now 80 years old but fortunately he's not turned curmudgeonly (unlike the now grumpy and increasingly foul mouthed Bill Bryson in his last book). The book is a look back at the life of Davies up until his marriage to Margaret Forster when he was 24. It's a great depiction of growing up in post war NE England, told with humour 'Back when I were a nipper oop North' memoirs are ten a penny, but I knew Hunter Davies wouldn't let me down. Davies has an easy, almost conversational style of writing. He's now 80 years old but fortunately he's not turned curmudgeonly (unlike the now grumpy and increasingly foul mouthed Bill Bryson in his last book). The book is a look back at the life of Davies up until his marriage to Margaret Forster when he was 24. It's a great depiction of growing up in post war NE England, told with humour and honesty. Really enjoyed it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dee

    Hunter Davies is the widower of one of my favourite authors, Margaret Forster, who sadly died last year. Having pieced together her life from her various non-fiction works, I was curious to see what the 'other half' would tell me, and it was a very pleasurable read. Although he's ten years older than me, there are many things we have in common in our background and upbringing, and it was like a trip down memory lane. Very readable! Hunter Davies is the widower of one of my favourite authors, Margaret Forster, who sadly died last year. Having pieced together her life from her various non-fiction works, I was curious to see what the 'other half' would tell me, and it was a very pleasurable read. Although he's ten years older than me, there are many things we have in common in our background and upbringing, and it was like a trip down memory lane. Very readable!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cath Cole

    An entertaining and informative account of a working class boy growing up in the north of England. The narrative is all the more poignant given the recent death of Margaret Forster, the authors wife.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Dipple

    I grew up in the. Midlands a generation after Hunter Davies but he could have been describing my childhood and early adulthood. This is a witty and observant memoir and I enjoyed his sense of humour.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    This was a real case of "kinda interesting, but kinda boring". How a man could have been brought into the world in such trying times, in such interesting times and portray his upbringing in such a mundane manner. So underwhelming is his storytelling of his life that when such incidences as running to an underground shelter to his from falling Nazi bombs or when, as the title suggests, after years of hardships and rationing the co-op finally gets bananas that you feel nothing. He doesn't describe hi This was a real case of "kinda interesting, but kinda boring". How a man could have been brought into the world in such trying times, in such interesting times and portray his upbringing in such a mundane manner. So underwhelming is his storytelling of his life that when such incidences as running to an underground shelter to his from falling Nazi bombs or when, as the title suggests, after years of hardships and rationing the co-op finally gets bananas that you feel nothing. He doesn't describe his world sufficiently enough so that you can feel the enormity of the occasion of hiding from bombs, nor does he envelop you in the hardships to appreciate how special the arrival of bananas is. I feel like I've been cheated out of a good story here. I don't know if this was ghost written, or if this 90-something guy penned this, but it's not what you'd expect from such a bestselling book about a life from that era. 2.5 stars - there are better books on the same subject out there.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Helen Felgate

    3-4 stars for this entertaining read from Hunter Davies chronicling his early years and marriage and the beginnings of his journalistic career. I was surprised how many of the author's experiences echoed my own in spite of Davies being some 15 years older than myself. It was a much slower moving world back then!. Davies didn't have the easiest start in life but became one of the working class boys of the period who made it in spite of all the odds to University. Davies is a very honest narrator 3-4 stars for this entertaining read from Hunter Davies chronicling his early years and marriage and the beginnings of his journalistic career. I was surprised how many of the author's experiences echoed my own in spite of Davies being some 15 years older than myself. It was a much slower moving world back then!. Davies didn't have the easiest start in life but became one of the working class boys of the period who made it in spite of all the odds to University. Davies is a very honest narrator detailing his own shortcomings and the strained relationship with his father who was struck down by m.s. prematurely and is bedridden for much of the narrative Suffused throughout the memoir is his obvious love and admiration for his recently deceased wife who attended Oxford university and became the successful and much loved novelist Margaret Forster.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Susan Leona Fisher

    Listened to the audio book read by Cameron Stewart of this autobiography taking us up to the author’s early twenties and his marriage to Margaret Forster. Hunter Davies is around 10 years older than me and my husband. We listened to a chapter a day and there were many memories and echoes of our own upbringing. We too were first generation university and remember post-war rationing. Having lived in Carlisle, North Cumbria, Manchester and North London, and knowing Durham quite well, there were fur Listened to the audio book read by Cameron Stewart of this autobiography taking us up to the author’s early twenties and his marriage to Margaret Forster. Hunter Davies is around 10 years older than me and my husband. We listened to a chapter a day and there were many memories and echoes of our own upbringing. We too were first generation university and remember post-war rationing. Having lived in Carlisle, North Cumbria, Manchester and North London, and knowing Durham quite well, there were further connections for us there. He puts across the privilege and opportunities of the ‘grammar school generation’ and the poignancy and privations of a home-life dominated by the long-term illness of his father. He also made us laugh out loud.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    This book was nostalgic but lacked something. Interesting story and interesting to learn about the author wife Margaret Forster and was lucky and privileged to go to university when his peers were destined for factories become apprentices or national service. I found the education part interesting and how universities have come on - especially Durham which is one of the elite universities. I was brought up in the late 60s and could relate to the Scottish relatives and how damaged some were in my This book was nostalgic but lacked something. Interesting story and interesting to learn about the author wife Margaret Forster and was lucky and privileged to go to university when his peers were destined for factories become apprentices or national service. I found the education part interesting and how universities have come on - especially Durham which is one of the elite universities. I was brought up in the late 60s and could relate to the Scottish relatives and how damaged some were in my experience through hardship and two wars. I felt once Hunter left home his family did not appear to have any bearing and maybe that was meant it is hard to identify. I found the author interesting and will read another of his books. Sadly this lacked something.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    This is the first part of the memoirs of Hunter Davies, the writer, journalist and biographer. It takes us from his birth in the 1930s, through the war, university life in the 50s, first jobs in journalism and finishes in 1960 with his marriage to Margaret Forster, the celebrated novelist who died last year. Like all good memoirs, this combines personal reflections and memories with pieces of social history, and he writes with humour and at a fast pace. I enjoyed comparing his life to mine, eleven This is the first part of the memoirs of Hunter Davies, the writer, journalist and biographer. It takes us from his birth in the 1930s, through the war, university life in the 50s, first jobs in journalism and finishes in 1960 with his marriage to Margaret Forster, the celebrated novelist who died last year. Like all good memoirs, this combines personal reflections and memories with pieces of social history, and he writes with humour and at a fast pace. I enjoyed comparing his life to mine, eleven years his junior, seeing many similarities but also differences in the intervening years. I look forward to the next instalment.

  16. 5 out of 5

    John

    I have always been wary of Hunter Davies, since he wrote that adulatory book about Tottenham Hotspur, about whom I am, tribally, uninterested. The bits I most enjoyed about this memoir were the “ah yes, I remember it well sections, rationing, playing in the streets, and the ABC Minors, which triggered off reminiscences of my own childhood, which like Davies I enjoyed, despite the privations both general and personal. I was a bit bored by the university section, not having been; my interest Wes p I have always been wary of Hunter Davies, since he wrote that adulatory book about Tottenham Hotspur, about whom I am, tribally, uninterested. The bits I most enjoyed about this memoir were the “ah yes, I remember it well sections, rationing, playing in the streets, and the ABC Minors, which triggered off reminiscences of my own childhood, which like Davies I enjoyed, despite the privations both general and personal. I was a bit bored by the university section, not having been; my interest Wes perked again by his early reporting memories, but his courtship Of Margaret Forster was of little interest. Not really my sort of book, but spasmodically entertaining.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Ray

    I enjoyed this and used to like his column years ago when I had time to read Sunday papers... There's a lot of social history in the earlier part of the book which would be of use to anyone studying the immediate post War period. I can just about relate to this, though am quite a bit younger, but things like rationing seemed to drag on for ages. The book tends to drag on a bit too, though, once we get to the leaving school and going to college/starting work era, but maybe that's just me being le I enjoyed this and used to like his column years ago when I had time to read Sunday papers... There's a lot of social history in the earlier part of the book which would be of use to anyone studying the immediate post War period. I can just about relate to this, though am quite a bit younger, but things like rationing seemed to drag on for ages. The book tends to drag on a bit too, though, once we get to the leaving school and going to college/starting work era, but maybe that's just me being less able to relate to this part. It's written with a great deal of dry humour and a refreshing lack of agony and sensationalism. Nothing wrong with that.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Colin Bardsley

    Not sure why I read this. I'm a fan of Davies' Beatles biography but that isn't enough to make me read his own memoir. Maybe it was the Co-op part of the title which, as a Co-op employee, piqued my interest a bit. Nevertheless, I wasn't bored but I also wasn't gripped either. Probably would only recommend to people who can identify with Davies in some way - either people of a similar age (he's 81), people from the places Davies has lived and are therefore described in the memoir (mainly Carlisle Not sure why I read this. I'm a fan of Davies' Beatles biography but that isn't enough to make me read his own memoir. Maybe it was the Co-op part of the title which, as a Co-op employee, piqued my interest a bit. Nevertheless, I wasn't bored but I also wasn't gripped either. Probably would only recommend to people who can identify with Davies in some way - either people of a similar age (he's 81), people from the places Davies has lived and are therefore described in the memoir (mainly Carlisle and Manchester), or people interested in journalism.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael Rumney

    Interesting enough about growing up in Carlisle but until Davies gets to be a journalist in Manchester towards the end of this book does it become really engaging and may be because my father worked as a photographer just before 1960 in Manchester and would have known some of the names mentioned by the author. A tad repetitive especially about his time at Durham University. Like myself Davies admits to being a poor speller which didn't hinder his progress as a writer. What comes across well is wri Interesting enough about growing up in Carlisle but until Davies gets to be a journalist in Manchester towards the end of this book does it become really engaging and may be because my father worked as a photographer just before 1960 in Manchester and would have known some of the names mentioned by the author. A tad repetitive especially about his time at Durham University. Like myself Davies admits to being a poor speller which didn't hinder his progress as a writer. What comes across well is writing is more about perspiration than inspiration.

  20. 5 out of 5

    PeterBlackCoach

    Read this book on an English friend's recommendation as it was an insight into struggle and resilience post WW2 in England - and how a positive disposition was helpful. Resilience is a declining attribute in today's economy and society - yet it was harder back then. This will be a useful addition to my coaching resources to provide perspective for my clients. rated 3/5 as did get a bit repetitive and being an autobiography, was a little too focused on self ! Read this book on an English friend's recommendation as it was an insight into struggle and resilience post WW2 in England - and how a positive disposition was helpful. Resilience is a declining attribute in today's economy and society - yet it was harder back then. This will be a useful addition to my coaching resources to provide perspective for my clients. rated 3/5 as did get a bit repetitive and being an autobiography, was a little too focused on self !

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    A gallop of a read and thoroughly enjoyable. Don't know why I was surprised at how different his writing was to his wife's, Margaret Forster. Ridiculous really. Anyway very entertaining and I just delighted in how much the love for Margaret shone out. They were so real. Looking forward to the next episode. A gallop of a read and thoroughly enjoyable. Don't know why I was surprised at how different his writing was to his wife's, Margaret Forster. Ridiculous really. Anyway very entertaining and I just delighted in how much the love for Margaret shone out. They were so real. Looking forward to the next episode.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Campbell

    Lovely story from Hunter, written in the honest, matter-of-fact style that we are used to. I especially loved his generous sharing of his growing up, with all the fears and worries that we all experience as we develop into adults. With thanks to Hunter, and to Tricia McCrow for giving me this book:-)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alastair

    Gentle, readable memoir Hunter Davies's skill as a writer and journalist is that he draws the reader into his pieces with a style that is straightforward and clear. This is a highly readable and interesting account of his early life. Gentle, readable memoir Hunter Davies's skill as a writer and journalist is that he draws the reader into his pieces with a style that is straightforward and clear. This is a highly readable and interesting account of his early life.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    Superb evocation of life in a Northern town and growing up in the post-war years in Britain. It's also something of a love story and how one young man started out on his career as a journalist. A 'must read' for Margaret Forster fans. Superb evocation of life in a Northern town and growing up in the post-war years in Britain. It's also something of a love story and how one young man started out on his career as a journalist. A 'must read' for Margaret Forster fans.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Interesting insight into growing up during WW2. Hunter Davies is one of the folks on my fantasy dinner party list, he seems to have lived such an interesting life. This book covers the earliest part of that life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    Despite being older than me and therefore not contemporaneous I found much of this echoing my own childhood experiences and bringing back a feel for the period. Some parts rambled a bit much but the honesty of approach was engaging.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    A fascinating account of Hunter Davies’ early life growing up in the North. Some of his memories triggered my own. I haven’t thought about Littlewood’s Pools in years ;-)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ben Twoonezero

    A good book, I have been reading his work for 37 years and he as never written a bad or mediocre book. A insight into how life used to be, well worth a read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Fellows

    Loved it. I was born a couple of years after the war but still remember the outside toilets, tin baths etc The.book is well written and interesting. I enjoyed every page.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Jeffrey

    An interesting account of life in post war Carlisle. It was nice to read his account of meeting his wife the writer Margaret Forster.

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