Hot Best Seller

The Book of Hygge: The Danish Art of Living Well

Availability: Ready to download

The most beautiful guide to the Danish custom of hygge, the everyday life philosophy for better living. Hygge is a feeling of belonging and warmth, a moment of comfort and contentment. This beautiful little book will help you to find hygge and embrace it every day. Make a pot of coffee, relax in your favourite chair and discover for yourself how life is better with hygge. 'B The most beautiful guide to the Danish custom of hygge, the everyday life philosophy for better living. Hygge is a feeling of belonging and warmth, a moment of comfort and contentment. This beautiful little book will help you to find hygge and embrace it every day. Make a pot of coffee, relax in your favourite chair and discover for yourself how life is better with hygge. 'Best [book] for the philosophy of hygge' You Magazine '...a philosophy for mindful living' The Guardian ‘Her book is a thing of beauty’ Irish Examiner


Compare

The most beautiful guide to the Danish custom of hygge, the everyday life philosophy for better living. Hygge is a feeling of belonging and warmth, a moment of comfort and contentment. This beautiful little book will help you to find hygge and embrace it every day. Make a pot of coffee, relax in your favourite chair and discover for yourself how life is better with hygge. 'B The most beautiful guide to the Danish custom of hygge, the everyday life philosophy for better living. Hygge is a feeling of belonging and warmth, a moment of comfort and contentment. This beautiful little book will help you to find hygge and embrace it every day. Make a pot of coffee, relax in your favourite chair and discover for yourself how life is better with hygge. 'Best [book] for the philosophy of hygge' You Magazine '...a philosophy for mindful living' The Guardian ‘Her book is a thing of beauty’ Irish Examiner

30 review for The Book of Hygge: The Danish Art of Living Well

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne

    What white nonsense is this? I’m familiar with the Norwegian koselig, and since even this book references it when explaining hygge I assumed it would be similar. In reality I think it is, but this book only spends a bit of time on the etymology and history of the word/concept. The rest of the book reads like a new agey idealized and myopic view of Danish culture. It presents families as a safe place, all problems can be solved if we just sit down and have a cup of tea. The books seems to try to What white nonsense is this? I’m familiar with the Norwegian koselig, and since even this book references it when explaining hygge I assumed it would be similar. In reality I think it is, but this book only spends a bit of time on the etymology and history of the word/concept. The rest of the book reads like a new agey idealized and myopic view of Danish culture. It presents families as a safe place, all problems can be solved if we just sit down and have a cup of tea. The books seems to try to package and sell this snake oil to Americans who eat up this white fantasy land where we can all just get along, if we all are that same. 🙄 I’m not looking for an Scandinavian Eat, Prey, Love.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    This is a beautiful little book, with some gorgeous images and some lovely sentiments. Hygge is something that seems both delightful and yet also deeply claustraphobic. Part of me gets the feeling that the emphasis on Hygge is a reaction to a Danish past where showy, violent one upmanship was the norm. Having read a few books about life in Denmark I am not sure that I could survive in a society that seems to value group cohesion and conformity above all things. In some ways I get the feeling tha This is a beautiful little book, with some gorgeous images and some lovely sentiments. Hygge is something that seems both delightful and yet also deeply claustraphobic. Part of me gets the feeling that the emphasis on Hygge is a reaction to a Danish past where showy, violent one upmanship was the norm. Having read a few books about life in Denmark I am not sure that I could survive in a society that seems to value group cohesion and conformity above all things. In some ways I get the feeling that it is this Nordic conformity that allows all of the real nastiness to escape in the form of their excellent but incredibly dark crime fiction. So thanks for conforming to the poin where such great writing and drama leaks out. :) Basically part of me loves the concept of relaxing into a soporific world governed by Hygge and Jante's law, while another part thinks I could well end up shaving my head and going all Lisbeth Salander on someone's arse! Either way this is essentially a great nordic take on Mindfulness and one that I find quite a lot easier to read about without gagging!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aspen Mitchell Mead

    This book was quite boring. The most interesting parts were the quotes from other writers! If anything, it made me want to read their works, so I shall list them here in case anyone wants to skip a step and just go straight to the sources. The writers she quoted are: William Morris, Sensual Home by Ilse Crawford, Annie Dillard, Gaston Bachelard, Erich Fromm, Tove Jansson, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life by Thomas Moore, and Ordinarily Sacred by Lyn This book was quite boring. The most interesting parts were the quotes from other writers! If anything, it made me want to read their works, so I shall list them here in case anyone wants to skip a step and just go straight to the sources. The writers she quoted are: William Morris, Sensual Home by Ilse Crawford, Annie Dillard, Gaston Bachelard, Erich Fromm, Tove Jansson, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life by Thomas Moore, and Ordinarily Sacred by Lynda Sexson.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Angela Groves

    The main thing I took away from this beautiful little book, was to appreciate the small things in life. This may seem really obvious, but in reality it is something that can be quite difficult to remember to do with a busy lifestyle. It is certainly something at this moment in time I need reminding of. The book encourages you to really examine the relationships you have with the people and surroundings in your life, to appreciate and cultivate them into something that makes you happy. To create The main thing I took away from this beautiful little book, was to appreciate the small things in life. This may seem really obvious, but in reality it is something that can be quite difficult to remember to do with a busy lifestyle. It is certainly something at this moment in time I need reminding of. The book encourages you to really examine the relationships you have with the people and surroundings in your life, to appreciate and cultivate them into something that makes you happy. To create relaxing environments, taking time to enjoy what you have. Blankets are mentioned a lot, I'm guessing because it's generally colder in Denmark... This is a really beautiful little book, lovely photographs and a wonderful layout. A perfect gift book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Temi Panayotova

    A nice calm read, rwally pleasant. But nothing new.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    It's beautiful, no doubt. It's vaguely inspiring. It also meanders around the topic with no clear direction and a host of ephemeral pleasantries. However, points for including excellent quotations from other writers. It's beautiful, no doubt. It's vaguely inspiring. It also meanders around the topic with no clear direction and a host of ephemeral pleasantries. However, points for including excellent quotations from other writers.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Annie ⚜️

    A deeper, more spiritual delve into the hygge theory than I've read elsewhere. Enjoyable. Thoroughly. And good for the soul. Beautiful pics as well. A deeper, more spiritual delve into the hygge theory than I've read elsewhere. Enjoyable. Thoroughly. And good for the soul. Beautiful pics as well.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alissa

    With Spring just around the corner, I'm kind of over the whole "let's get cozy in front of the fire with hot cocoa and fuzzy slipper-socks" thing. Cabin fever has set in with a vengence. Probably not the most optimal time to read a book about Hygge. Still, it was all right. Much more accessible than other Hygge books I've read. For example, this Hygge book didn't try to sell me candles...or encourage unhealthy eating habits, like binge-eating cakes and pies and such. This book also didn't suggest With Spring just around the corner, I'm kind of over the whole "let's get cozy in front of the fire with hot cocoa and fuzzy slipper-socks" thing. Cabin fever has set in with a vengence. Probably not the most optimal time to read a book about Hygge. Still, it was all right. Much more accessible than other Hygge books I've read. For example, this Hygge book didn't try to sell me candles...or encourage unhealthy eating habits, like binge-eating cakes and pies and such. This book also didn't suggest that Hygge was something exclusive to Danes and no one else could really achieve it (I know...how pretentious, right?). Rather, this Hygge book talked about the actual elements of Hygge. Like comfort, coziness, togetherness, and happiness through simple pleasures (HA! I KNEW it wasn't about buying 1,001 candles!!). Kind of common knowledge. I didn't learn anything new I didn't already know from observing my cats, who are both Grand Masters of Hygge. AH-HA! Now THERE'S a book I should write: "All I Need to Know About Hygge I Learned From My Cats." p.s. What's up with the random photos, though? They're like something a shrink would show you ("Describe how this photo makes you feel about your mother") when they're trying to get inside your head.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    I won Louisa Thomsen Brits' The Book of Hygge from a Books Are My Bag competition on Twitter, and couldn't have been happier with my prize. As an object, the book is beautiful; it is a sturdy yet compact hardback, which has been filled with the most lovely and calming photographic accompaniments, some of them double paged spreads. Thomsen Brits' book is essentially a manual on hygge, and she demonstrates how to notice the little moments and take pleasure in everything. Hygge is a big thing in my I won Louisa Thomsen Brits' The Book of Hygge from a Books Are My Bag competition on Twitter, and couldn't have been happier with my prize. As an object, the book is beautiful; it is a sturdy yet compact hardback, which has been filled with the most lovely and calming photographic accompaniments, some of them double paged spreads. Thomsen Brits' book is essentially a manual on hygge, and she demonstrates how to notice the little moments and take pleasure in everything. Hygge is a big thing in my life, although I must admit that I didn't know that there was a precise word for it until a couple of years ago! The Book of Hygge is a comforting and nicely written read, which really makes you take note of what is around you, and the little moments which you should never take for granted. It is a particularly perfect tome to curl up with in front of a roaring fire on a winter's day - there's a wonderful hygge moment for you right there.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    While the book is not hard to read in just one afternoon, I think the author is repeating herself a lot in this little book. That made me often think, that I was reading the same page or chapter. What I liked in this book were the beautiful pictures.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Marsden

    A bit on the heavy side - more of a philosophical/historical guide to hygge. It's worth noting that the author is making a donation to a homeless charity for a every copy that is bought. A bit on the heavy side - more of a philosophical/historical guide to hygge. It's worth noting that the author is making a donation to a homeless charity for a every copy that is bought.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Yes. A beautiful little book that says the same thing over and over and over again. 2 stars instead of one because it has good photos and design.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Heather Culley

    these hygge books seem privileged and surprisingly bitchy.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Krystal

    Repeat after me for the 100th time: Danish are some of the happiest people on Earth. The book just repeats itself in various categories, but they all say the same thing. Get cozy, be present, be intimate, be warm, eat well, etc. I lost my page once and it took about 15 minutes to find it again because every page sounded like where I had left off. The pictures are nice but nobody's house looks like that, or is having a bathtub out in the forest practical. I understand it's the concept, but it get Repeat after me for the 100th time: Danish are some of the happiest people on Earth. The book just repeats itself in various categories, but they all say the same thing. Get cozy, be present, be intimate, be warm, eat well, etc. I lost my page once and it took about 15 minutes to find it again because every page sounded like where I had left off. The pictures are nice but nobody's house looks like that, or is having a bathtub out in the forest practical. I understand it's the concept, but it gets old after beating a dead horse for 200 pages. So maybe read the first few chapters and call it a day.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Darcy

    I like the idea of this book, it's more of a slow down and smell the roses theory. Live in the moment, take joy in the small things and use your "special" dishes every day. I like the idea of this book, it's more of a slow down and smell the roses theory. Live in the moment, take joy in the small things and use your "special" dishes every day.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jessie Drew

    This was a warm little book, interspersed with relevant quotes in large type (I like that!). The entire book is about the essence of hygge; I was hoping for a little more instruction but what the author did was kindly impart, in friendly details, all you'd ever want to know about hygge. She's Danish so I trust her POV. While the book isn't quite what I expected, she does a nice job. For me, the photos inside and the quotes are the best parts. Truly beautiful. This was a warm little book, interspersed with relevant quotes in large type (I like that!). The entire book is about the essence of hygge; I was hoping for a little more instruction but what the author did was kindly impart, in friendly details, all you'd ever want to know about hygge. She's Danish so I trust her POV. While the book isn't quite what I expected, she does a nice job. For me, the photos inside and the quotes are the best parts. Truly beautiful.

  17. 4 out of 5

    yenni m

    I can imagine such a hygge-filled life (in my current time-location) as slightly blind and delirious perhaps. Snap my fingers to a Danish life and the world would (beautifully) disappear. Equal parts dream and clocking-out. Yeah, I'd be alright with that. Presence, softness, warmth, simplicity. I support/desire that. I can imagine such a hygge-filled life (in my current time-location) as slightly blind and delirious perhaps. Snap my fingers to a Danish life and the world would (beautifully) disappear. Equal parts dream and clocking-out. Yeah, I'd be alright with that. Presence, softness, warmth, simplicity. I support/desire that.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mel MacLean

    Very clear descriptions of hygge and all that it entails.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nilgün

    This is the way that I live my life since I was 16 or so it was coming Neutral from inside myself. I love the way to live hygge. And find a book that describe my life was so glad and satisfied thank you. So I would recommend this really.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rabbit {Paint me like one of your 19th century gothic heroines!}

    Rating: 3.5 This book mostly focuses the philosophy behind this lifestyle. This book has a 'rich people' vibe tbh. Rating: 3.5 This book mostly focuses the philosophy behind this lifestyle. This book has a 'rich people' vibe tbh.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I'm partway through, and I'm glad I stuck with it! It's very repetitive, but there are gems hidden inside. I'll finish it, but honestly, a shorter book with more pictures like it has would have been better. I'm partway through, and I'm glad I stuck with it! It's very repetitive, but there are gems hidden inside. I'll finish it, but honestly, a shorter book with more pictures like it has would have been better.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    This book felt warm and cozy as I read it. This book could have been half as long and been sufficient.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I feel like Hygge in Denmark is either exaggerated or their unions and safety net and 33 hour work week and general cultural homogeneity is what makes this possible. This book is full of lush descriptions of how the Danes decompress and go about a seemingly relaxed way of life as if looking relaxed and being relaxed at all times is life itself. There are many minimalist pictures of hipster things appearing in a middle of nowhere that I'm not sure Denmark actually has. I do hygge on a regular bas I feel like Hygge in Denmark is either exaggerated or their unions and safety net and 33 hour work week and general cultural homogeneity is what makes this possible. This book is full of lush descriptions of how the Danes decompress and go about a seemingly relaxed way of life as if looking relaxed and being relaxed at all times is life itself. There are many minimalist pictures of hipster things appearing in a middle of nowhere that I'm not sure Denmark actually has. I do hygge on a regular basis with blankets and candles and tea with shared food and experiences when I can but it's limited in comparison to the way this book makes hygge seem. This book makes it seem like Danes in a constant state of hygge at all times. So, perhaps Denmark is actually liberal hipster utopia I've been looking for. I'm not sure that the stress of 2020 fits in.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Penelope

    A beautifully produced lovely little book which in itself is a little bit of Hygge. With a focus on finding the special in the everyday rituals of life, and on the importance of pausing and making the time to appreciate what we have this is a book which makes you realise that Hygge is more than a Scandinavian way of living but is something that we should all welcome into our lives. Peppered throughout with beautiful photography and thoughtful quotes this is a joy to read and a book that I will r A beautifully produced lovely little book which in itself is a little bit of Hygge. With a focus on finding the special in the everyday rituals of life, and on the importance of pausing and making the time to appreciate what we have this is a book which makes you realise that Hygge is more than a Scandinavian way of living but is something that we should all welcome into our lives. Peppered throughout with beautiful photography and thoughtful quotes this is a joy to read and a book that I will return to when I need to be reminded that happiness and contentment is often found in the ordinary and not the extraordinary. Recommended to read whilst covered in a cosy blanket, drinking the hot beverage of your choice from a favourite mug!

  25. 4 out of 5

    April

    Beautifully laid out and written. It is poetic and mindful -- full of quotes and encouragements to recognize beauty in the simple, mundane aspects of everyday life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Esther

    I enjoyed this book. Reading it was a pleasant experience and learning about Danish culture was interesting. However this book became extremely repetitive and long winded.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    A beautifully designed book that helps one feel hygge whilst reading it. A much more philosophical look at this concept than many of the other books currently available.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Unintentionally, “The Book of Hygge: The Danish Art of Contentment, Comfort, and Connection,” is the third in a series of books I’ve read over the past month (“The Art of Peace” and “The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck” being the other two) loosely connected around the idea of “getting more from less.” If our modern age is defined by anything, it’s surely immediate access to an overabundance of everything — from cheap wear-for-the-season-and-toss fashions and inexpensive home goods to nearly ine Unintentionally, “The Book of Hygge: The Danish Art of Contentment, Comfort, and Connection,” is the third in a series of books I’ve read over the past month (“The Art of Peace” and “The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck” being the other two) loosely connected around the idea of “getting more from less.” If our modern age is defined by anything, it’s surely immediate access to an overabundance of everything — from cheap wear-for-the-season-and-toss fashions and inexpensive home goods to nearly inescapable media feeds and the unlimited streaming of just about anything we can think of. Bruce Springsteen’s 1992 single “57 Channels (and Nothin’ On)” seems positively quaint 25 years on. Whether it’s physical, emotional, or spiritual decluttering, there is definitely a movement to push back against the onslaught of pervasive everythingness. If you haven’t heard of hygge (pronounced “hoo-ga”), chances are you’ve been living under a rock: an Amazon.com search of the term “hygge” turns up over 1,000 books, and, like me, your Goodreads feed has undoubtedly turned up one or another on the subject, whether read by a friend or simply as a “Popular On Goodreads” promo. Despite (or in spite of) the zeitgeist, neither this nor anything else hygge was on my radar, but it was recommended to me by our new business partner as it falls squarely in line with the brand positioning we have been strategizing and defining over the past couple of months. As John “Hannibal” Smith often says on The A-Team, “I love it when a plan comes together,” and it’s an inspiring feeling when you’ve unexpectedly tapped into something that, though trendy now, transcends trends, dates back to cultural ideas from the nineteenth century, and actually mines universal truths we all seem to be trying to reconnect with. “Hygge” is a Danish word meaning “to give courage, comfort, or joy,” and in our current context refers to “a form of everyday togetherness.” What it’s all about is, honestly, best summed up by the book’s back cover: “Hygge is a universal feeling of being warm, safe, comforted, and sheltered — an experience of belonging to the moment and to each other. Hygge anchors us, reminding us to slow down, to connect with place and with one another, to dwell and savor rather than rush and spend.” Hygge is not rocket science. In fact, it’s exactly the opposite. Its principles are uncomplicated. It can happen anytime in any place, alone or in groups, while relaxing or doing chores. When you are present in the here and now — in this moment, in this place — whether curled up by the fire with a blanket, having a meal with friends, acknowledging the sacred in the secular, or focusing on people rather than things, that is hygge. An invitation to welcome abundance and contentment into your life, Louisa Thomsen Brits’ pocket-sized “The Book of Hygge” is that rare book that actually embodies what it espouses, and you will savor the time, however brief, you spend with it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Hygge, pronounced Hoo-ga, is a Danish word which means roughly cozy and it became like everywhere in like 2016ish. So, unlike Kondo’s belief system about things that spark joy, hygge is still about less, but is celebrating the things that provide comfort. For instance, the small things, like your cup of coffee, the sound of rain in the streets, the breeze coming from an open window. Thomsen-Brits lays out the basic beliefs that Danish and Scandinavian people have, why it’s a good thing and how i Hygge, pronounced Hoo-ga, is a Danish word which means roughly cozy and it became like everywhere in like 2016ish. So, unlike Kondo’s belief system about things that spark joy, hygge is still about less, but is celebrating the things that provide comfort. For instance, the small things, like your cup of coffee, the sound of rain in the streets, the breeze coming from an open window. Thomsen-Brits lays out the basic beliefs that Danish and Scandinavian people have, why it’s a good thing and how it originates in their little moments. It originates in the idealism and individualism that Danes have. It also originates in their sense of celebrating things together, like celebrating coffee and cake. (Not a bad thing in my book). It also mentions like celebrating the moments and not recording them with your phone. Which is a belief that I have had and have said before. I have Swedish background, so some of this hits the very, very familiar. Like when Hygge became trendy, I was like we had it before. I’m not entirely sure what is nature and what is nurture here. This is a pretty blue book with pretty calming pictures. If you are new to the concept of hygge, it gives you a pretty solid background. It’s also a bit repetitious, so it repeats again and again what hygge is. I found it calming; others might not. And also, some of this is totally ideal. Can you hygger with having cluttered dining room tables? What about mismatched plates? And some of it seems like stuff stereotypical WASPs like and kinda homogenized. So, some of it’s problematic. My take away from it, what brings you joy, what small things delight you in these crazy times? They can be things like a fave coffee mug, a fave tree and a fave sweater. (One of mine is a clunky, grey one) What hygge stuff can you find, like small things can you find that provide comfort and centering? It’s such a pretty, pretty blue book. I love the pictures.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Martin

    This book is exactly what I needed to start my year. I know that I will have to read it one or two more times this year to fully allow the ideology to be absorbed, not only into my mind, but into my life. I adore and believe in the basic premise of hygge, but my life does not reflect that. I would venture most American lives are not hyggily. We become so immersed in our mundane tasks, our achievements, our future, or our basic struggle at survival that making space for mindfulness and simplistic This book is exactly what I needed to start my year. I know that I will have to read it one or two more times this year to fully allow the ideology to be absorbed, not only into my mind, but into my life. I adore and believe in the basic premise of hygge, but my life does not reflect that. I would venture most American lives are not hyggily. We become so immersed in our mundane tasks, our achievements, our future, or our basic struggle at survival that making space for mindfulness and simplistic comfort is not encouraged or modeled. To practice hygge is to be aware of the simple pleasures and the things that bring comfort to ourselves and others and then act on those comforts. To bask in the joy and contentment of allowing oneself to be comforted without anxiety of the next task or guilt of other people/pressing concerns. It is NOT dissociating in the form of binge watching Netflix, scrolling on Instagram, or drink to the point of excess. My realization is that I thought it common practice to not allow those pleasures often, to delay gratification. I do not often allow myself comforts and pleasures because of the mindset that I should be... Earning them? Perhaps? But I see that the social theme around me is to either completely deny oneself, or to completly immerse oneself in pleasure to the point of gluttony. My goal is to create an environment of simple pleasure in my daily life, my environment, and in the lives of those around me.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...