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Cook Korean!: A Comic Book with Recipes: A Cookbook

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New York Times bestseller • A charming introduction to the basics of Korean cooking in graphic novel form, with 64 recipes, ingredient profiles, and more, presented through light-hearted comics.   Fun to look at and easy to use, this unique combination of cookbook and graphic novel is the ideal introduction to cooking Korean cuisine at home. Robin Ha’s colorful and humorous New York Times bestseller • A charming introduction to the basics of Korean cooking in graphic novel form, with 64 recipes, ingredient profiles, and more, presented through light-hearted comics.   Fun to look at and easy to use, this unique combination of cookbook and graphic novel is the ideal introduction to cooking Korean cuisine at home. Robin Ha’s colorful and humorous one-to three-page comics fully illustrate the steps and ingredients needed to bring more than sixty traditional (and some not-so-traditional) dishes to life. In these playful but exact recipes, you’ll learn how to create everything from easy kimchi (mak kimchi) and soy garlic beef over rice (bulgogi dupbap) to seaweed rice rolls (gimbap) and beyond. Friendly and inviting, Cook Korean! is perfect for beginners and seasoned cooks alike. Each chapter includes personal anecdotes and cultural insights from Ha, providing an intimate entry point for those looking to try their hand at this cuisine.


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New York Times bestseller • A charming introduction to the basics of Korean cooking in graphic novel form, with 64 recipes, ingredient profiles, and more, presented through light-hearted comics.   Fun to look at and easy to use, this unique combination of cookbook and graphic novel is the ideal introduction to cooking Korean cuisine at home. Robin Ha’s colorful and humorous New York Times bestseller • A charming introduction to the basics of Korean cooking in graphic novel form, with 64 recipes, ingredient profiles, and more, presented through light-hearted comics.   Fun to look at and easy to use, this unique combination of cookbook and graphic novel is the ideal introduction to cooking Korean cuisine at home. Robin Ha’s colorful and humorous one-to three-page comics fully illustrate the steps and ingredients needed to bring more than sixty traditional (and some not-so-traditional) dishes to life. In these playful but exact recipes, you’ll learn how to create everything from easy kimchi (mak kimchi) and soy garlic beef over rice (bulgogi dupbap) to seaweed rice rolls (gimbap) and beyond. Friendly and inviting, Cook Korean! is perfect for beginners and seasoned cooks alike. Each chapter includes personal anecdotes and cultural insights from Ha, providing an intimate entry point for those looking to try their hand at this cuisine.

30 review for Cook Korean!: A Comic Book with Recipes: A Cookbook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    This was a great idea. All cookbooks should be comic books. Now if only this thing would lay flat so I didn't have to keep propping it open! I love Korean BBW. I think you mean BBQ. Yeah, well, that too. I also love knowing what all the cool kids are talking about when they call each other "bae" nowadays. Huh? What do you mean? "Bae" is Korean for Asian pear. The more you know. I dig Kimchi and these kimchi recipes are Asian pears. That didn't sound right. Are we sure kids these days aren't just dumb? This was a great idea. All cookbooks should be comic books. Now if only this thing would lay flat so I didn't have to keep propping it open! I love Korean BBW. I think you mean BBQ. Yeah, well, that too. I also love knowing what all the cool kids are talking about when they call each other "bae" nowadays. Huh? What do you mean? "Bae" is Korean for Asian pear. The more you know. I dig Kimchi and these kimchi recipes are Asian pears. That didn't sound right. Are we sure kids these days aren't just dumb? No. Not sure. I've heard "bae" is Dutch for poop, too, so that's a thing. So my choices are Asian pear or poop? Yeah. Fuck. Yeah. Okay, back to the review. Short ribs are good, son! And this book right here? This book RYCHEER! This book'll tell you how to cook some them there short ribs, Cuz. Talking lip-smacking tallywhacker-tempting good short ribs. Don't have all the fancy ingredients? Don't worry. Robin Ha says some motherfuckers just use Coca-Cola for their marinade because who has time for soy sauce and ginger and other expensive shit. Just drain a 20 ounce Coke into a plastic bag, drop in your short ribs, and hang out with your Dutch poop or your Asian pears for like thirty minutes, then cook them bitches (the short ribs, not your "baes", because this is cooking not cannibalism) and you got yourselves some goddamn motherfucking Korean BBQ, you sexy fucker! But wait, ladies, there's more! Need a hot beef injection? Well there's a recipe for Spicy Beef Soup in this piece! You only need like thirty-seven goddamn ingredients and four weeks vacation time to make it, but holy shit will it make your side dude have main-dude feelings. Also, this Spicy Beef Soup will make your asshole burn. Just warning you. We're talking nuclear hell hole, got me? We're talking lava butt, son. Kinda shit that'll singe your leg hair. So whataya do after you set your rectum on fire? You eat Cold Buckwheat Noodles, of course! But first you're gonna need some Yengyeoja... holy fuck, did I spell that right the first time? I fucking did! YEA! Anyway, you're gonna need some of that Yeng shit. It's yellow wasabi paste. It's like regular wasabi but yellower. You're also gonna need a bae. No, like a real bae. One of them Asian pears, because we all know you're gonna die alone. Then some rice wine vinegar and some other shit I can't pronounce and you got yourself some fucking Cold Buckwheat Noodles®. Finally, Robin Ha gives us some of her very own Korean Fusion recipes like Omelet Fried Rice and Spicy Chicken Tacos because who doesn't love some hot cock! In summation: Comic books are a unique way to learn how to cook anything. Korean food especially. If you have $20 and don't mind a cookbook that won't stay the fuck open when you're trying to read the recipes, buy the fuck outta this book. Or don't. Until next time, I'll be slurping on some buckwheat noodles dipped in Yengyeoja. Ha! I spelled it right again! Final Judgment: A hundred different ways to make your rectum burn.

  2. 4 out of 5

    7jane

    3,5 stars. This is a rather fun Korean cookbook, since it’s in a comic form, making it also a fairly quickly read (plus one can see all the dishes ready here, no photos needed). The author is a Korean who moved to US in her teens, and usually does comics, so doing this book must’ve been easier in that sense. There are 60+ recipes, including fusion dishes, and some area already vegetarian (and further some can be made vegetarian/vegan with some changes). Every recipe group and recipe has an introd 3,5 stars. This is a rather fun Korean cookbook, since it’s in a comic form, making it also a fairly quickly read (plus one can see all the dishes ready here, no photos needed). The author is a Korean who moved to US in her teens, and usually does comics, so doing this book must’ve been easier in that sense. There are 60+ recipes, including fusion dishes, and some area already vegetarian (and further some can be made vegetarian/vegan with some changes). Every recipe group and recipe has an introduction, and a few food stories are also included. The cartoon girl in this book, Dengki, acts as the author-voice. The general introduction shows 7 key ingredients, the fridge, the pantry, a typical table (for a family), rice types, rice how-to, and the food regions (North Korea included). I think the food processor sound – ‘wee’ – was funny, for the other meanings that word has… I would’ve used ‘whirr’ or something like that! XD Some recipes I found interesting: Bean sprout salad, Soy spinach, Pan-fried tofu, Spicy bok choy, Soy garlic beef over rice, Spicy pork over rice, Kimchi stew, Seaweed soup with beef, Black sesame porridge, Spicy cold noodles, Brown sugar pancakes, Kimchi fried rice, Gimbap rolls, Kimchi pancake, Omelet fried rice, Black soybean noodles, Spicy chicken tacos, Soy sesame mayonnaise (in the Korean Burgers recipe). (not showing the kimchi & pickles because they are quite familiar to many; and seafood and alcoholic drinks sections because I have no interest in them) Reading this was quite fun, though I think you might be left wanting more recipes. Still, it was worth getting this, and the humorous and informative text made things even better. Really tempted to make some food from here, now…

  3. 5 out of 5

    Yodamom

    Perfect for the visual chef who wants to learn basic Korean cooking The animation is very well done with easy to follow recipes. Sweet backstory to go along with the authors recipes, and her path to getting this book done. I have a lot of experience with cooking Korean foods and still found some new ideas in here. All the recipes are good solid basic Korean cooking that will lead the reader down the path to delicious eating. I couldn't help but like the author her personality comes through in the Perfect for the visual chef who wants to learn basic Korean cooking The animation is very well done with easy to follow recipes. Sweet backstory to go along with the authors recipes, and her path to getting this book done. I have a lot of experience with cooking Korean foods and still found some new ideas in here. All the recipes are good solid basic Korean cooking that will lead the reader down the path to delicious eating. I couldn't help but like the author her personality comes through in the illustrations. This book has been added to my gifting idea library.

  4. 5 out of 5

    First Second Books

    Since I'm a vegetarian, I'm always a little anxious about Korean food, because there's the potential for secret!fish sauce. This book is super-adaptable both for vegetarians and for people who don't have as much time to spend cooking as they'd like. Also, the chapter heads are gorgeous! Since I'm a vegetarian, I'm always a little anxious about Korean food, because there's the potential for secret!fish sauce. This book is super-adaptable both for vegetarians and for people who don't have as much time to spend cooking as they'd like. Also, the chapter heads are gorgeous!

  5. 4 out of 5

    CaseyTheCanadianLesbrarian

    This is the first cookbook that I’ve just, like, read cover to cover. The comic format really lends itself to that, as does Ha’s habit of adding cultural context and details to recipes. The recipes are also interspersed with personal stories, like about how popular one dish was for kids to bring to school or how she learned how to cook something from her mom. I love the bright, colorful drawings: cute and emotional for stories and practical and helpful for recipe instructions. Warning: Cook Kore This is the first cookbook that I’ve just, like, read cover to cover. The comic format really lends itself to that, as does Ha’s habit of adding cultural context and details to recipes. The recipes are also interspersed with personal stories, like about how popular one dish was for kids to bring to school or how she learned how to cook something from her mom. I love the bright, colorful drawings: cute and emotional for stories and practical and helpful for recipe instructions. Warning: Cook Korean! will make you very hungry.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tisha

    Have you ever seen a recipe book with illustrations??? I hadn’t until I came across this beautiful book! This book is all about Korean foods. Being a K-drama fan, I loved this vibrantly illustrated book jam-packed with illustrations of Korean foods and recipes to make them. Although I do not own a great interest in cooking or eating, I love watching cookery shows and so, when I came across this book, I felt like I have to read it! As I have been following Korean dramas, movies, reality shows for Have you ever seen a recipe book with illustrations??? I hadn’t until I came across this beautiful book! This book is all about Korean foods. Being a K-drama fan, I loved this vibrantly illustrated book jam-packed with illustrations of Korean foods and recipes to make them. Although I do not own a great interest in cooking or eating, I love watching cookery shows and so, when I came across this book, I felt like I have to read it! As I have been following Korean dramas, movies, reality shows for a while, most of the things here are quite familiar to me. So it was easy to relate. But even if someone who is not acquainted with the Korean culture at all reads this book, that person will also be enjoying it I believe. And if you are passionate about eating and cooking, just READ IT! The writer+illustrator, Robin Ha has presented each and every step of cooking so beautifully that I just kept looking at its pages! See, how stunning and eye-catching the illustrations are! I loved this book! ^_^

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    I've been looking forward to reading this cookbook since seeing it on NPR's Best of 2016 list. I had to wait a little longer than anticipated because my 10-yr old son opened the Amazon package first and started reading it before I had a chance! He was initially attracted to the bright, comic book-style drawings, but then became fully drawn in because the book is so much more than just recipes. Cook Korean! also includes background information about the author, her food journey (her love for cook I've been looking forward to reading this cookbook since seeing it on NPR's Best of 2016 list. I had to wait a little longer than anticipated because my 10-yr old son opened the Amazon package first and started reading it before I had a chance! He was initially attracted to the bright, comic book-style drawings, but then became fully drawn in because the book is so much more than just recipes. Cook Korean! also includes background information about the author, her food journey (her love for cooking started in Italy as an exchange student), how she developed the recipes and came up with the idea for the cookbook, and the role that food plays in Korean culture. I own a few other Korean cookbooks, but this one rates the best on so many levels. I love the format's originality and Robin Ha's playful drawings. Packaging the recipes in this graphic style makes Korean cuisine seem more accessible and less intimidating. Perhaps because of the novel concept of the book, I incorrectly assumed the recipes would be Korean-inspired, but not necessarily recipes your grandmother would make. While there is a chapter on Korean fusion, the majority of the recipes are for traditional Korean dishes. I was pleasantly surprised to see that the author also included many comfort-food recipes that my mom used to make us growing up but that you rarely see included on menus of Korean restaurants - in other words, "everyday" recipes and not just special occasion dishes. I made the Chile Chicken Stew (dakbokkeumtang) last night for dinner and got a thumbs up from all three of my kids and the hubby. When does that ever happen?! I've also got about a dozen more recipes earmarked to try, many of which were picked out by my kids. This imaginative and fun book would make a great gift for lovers of Korean cuisine or anyone who may be curious about it. I plan to buy three more copies for my sisters-in-law!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Maia

    I got this from the library expecting to just check out the vegetarian recipes, but I got sucked it and read the whole thing! Each chapter opens with a beautiful watercolor painting, a short comic on the author's relationship with a specific dish, and then a wide variety of brightly colored and clearly drawn recipes. There are soups, noodle dishes, a seafood section, a meat and poultry section, six recipes for different types of kimchi, porridges, snacks, cocktails, rice cakes and Korean fusion. I got this from the library expecting to just check out the vegetarian recipes, but I got sucked it and read the whole thing! Each chapter opens with a beautiful watercolor painting, a short comic on the author's relationship with a specific dish, and then a wide variety of brightly colored and clearly drawn recipes. There are soups, noodle dishes, a seafood section, a meat and poultry section, six recipes for different types of kimchi, porridges, snacks, cocktails, rice cakes and Korean fusion. Many cookbooks try to be food-blog-type-memoirs at the same time, with mixed success. This book balanced the perfect amount of memories and cultural information to recipes. I finished reading it and immediately wanted to cook something!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Cook Korean!: A Comic Book with Recipes is a graphic novel cookbook written and illustrated by Robin Ha. Ha, a professional cartoonist and amateur chef, gained online notoriety for her Tumblr project entitled "Banchan in 2 Pages," a weekly comic with illustrated instructions for various Korean dishes, collected with fifty new recipes in this book. Offerings range from traditional to contemporary, and include six types of kimchi, seafood dishes such as spicy octopus and pan-fried yellow croaker, a Cook Korean!: A Comic Book with Recipes is a graphic novel cookbook written and illustrated by Robin Ha. Ha, a professional cartoonist and amateur chef, gained online notoriety for her Tumblr project entitled "Banchan in 2 Pages," a weekly comic with illustrated instructions for various Korean dishes, collected with fifty new recipes in this book. Offerings range from traditional to contemporary, and include six types of kimchi, seafood dishes such as spicy octopus and pan-fried yellow croaker, and separate chapters for stews, porridges, noodles, and street food. Each chapter includes personal anecdotes and cultural insights from Ha, providing an intimate entry point for those looking to try their hand at this cuisine. Cook Korean!: A Comic Book with Recipes is written and constructed rather well. Promoted as an intersection of graphic novel and cookbook, it is a work in need of better direction. The illustrations are colorful and charming, but her two-page compositions are highly nonlinear and extremely crowded, making the recipes appear more complicated than they actually are. Arrows and dotted lines are employed to give structure, but they further distract the eye. Meanwhile, numerous descriptions and instructions are presented in speech bubbles or crammed onto the page in tight paragraphs. All in all, Cook Korean!: A Comic Book with Recipes is a wonderful graphic novel and an adventure in risky chopping for those who like to read along as they prep.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Verena

    Now that I’ve prepared a couple of these meals, I can give this book the 5-star rating it deserves. Pros: - The food is great! - There’s a good variety of recipes, and each section of the book contains an introduction to the kind of meal it is about (how it is prepared, when it is eaten, additional cultural context). - These introductions also contain autobiographical comics related to the topic, which I enjoyed. - The artwork in general is very pretty and helps making the instructions very easy to Now that I’ve prepared a couple of these meals, I can give this book the 5-star rating it deserves. Pros: - The food is great! - There’s a good variety of recipes, and each section of the book contains an introduction to the kind of meal it is about (how it is prepared, when it is eaten, additional cultural context). - These introductions also contain autobiographical comics related to the topic, which I enjoyed. - The artwork in general is very pretty and helps making the instructions very easy to follow. Cons: - My family is now very distrustful of the spice level of any food I prepare. - Whenever I flip through the book and look at the sketches and paintings, I get very hungry. I’d highly recommend this to everybody who would like to get into cooking Korean food.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Navya

    So pretty I thought I could eat it

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    Ha’s graphic memoir was my favorite read of 2020 so I bought this to support her previous published work and out of the interest of learning about Korean cuisine. I wish there were more books like this! There are little vignettes that can totally be seen as a precursor to her memoir. Also, there’s a “host” of sorts who walks the reader through everything! I currently keep this book in my bag in the lucky moment I might be near an Asian grocery/market whenever I’m traveling.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Notess

    I checked it out of the library and didn't get a chance to try out any of the recipes, but the art and design are absolutely outstanding! I love the watercolor art at the beginning of each chapter, and the recipes are a perfect blend of great art and informative sidebars that don't distract from the main flow of the recipes. It's really impressive and original to see a recipe book like this, I loved paging through it and hope to check it out again... I checked it out of the library and didn't get a chance to try out any of the recipes, but the art and design are absolutely outstanding! I love the watercolor art at the beginning of each chapter, and the recipes are a perfect blend of great art and informative sidebars that don't distract from the main flow of the recipes. It's really impressive and original to see a recipe book like this, I loved paging through it and hope to check it out again...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I wouldn’t normally include a cookbook on my list for Goodreads but this book is definitely unique! Each recipe is drawn out in beautiful detail with helpful tips interspersed with the directions. Sometimes the veggies have cute faces too, which is always fun. I’d always thought cooking Korean food would be too hard and though I have yet to try it this book makes it feel possible! I want all cookbooks to be made like this because as a visual learner it’s soooo amazing to see how the veggies shou I wouldn’t normally include a cookbook on my list for Goodreads but this book is definitely unique! Each recipe is drawn out in beautiful detail with helpful tips interspersed with the directions. Sometimes the veggies have cute faces too, which is always fun. I’d always thought cooking Korean food would be too hard and though I have yet to try it this book makes it feel possible! I want all cookbooks to be made like this because as a visual learner it’s soooo amazing to see how the veggies should be chopped etc. I picked up useful cooking skills and things to improve my cooking of all types of food just from my first read. There are comic book pages of information before each section that describe bits of Korean culture and the author’s early life. Make sure you know where your closest Korean grocery store is before you start reading because you’ll want to cook right away! Yum!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Raina

    I've been saying all cookbooks should be comics for years. At least since Relish, which triggered memories of illustrated recipes from my childhood. Not that I get a say - as much as I love eating, the kitchen is not my domain in our house. So, of course, as soon as I finished this book, I handed it over to my partner, since 1. I hope she makes some of these recipes sometime, and 2. She's been flirting with the idea of writing an auto-bio/cookbook graphic novel for about as long as I've known h I've been saying all cookbooks should be comics for years. At least since Relish, which triggered memories of illustrated recipes from my childhood. Not that I get a say - as much as I love eating, the kitchen is not my domain in our house. So, of course, as soon as I finished this book, I handed it over to my partner, since 1. I hope she makes some of these recipes sometime, and 2. She's been flirting with the idea of writing an auto-bio/cookbook graphic novel for about as long as I've known her. I fell in love with Korean food at the spa. Just thinking about the dishes we order there makes me salivate. Of course, maybe I'm extra wistful because we haven't eaten at a restaurant since March. So, while I skimmed (and certainly didn't make) the recipes, reading the interesting facts about ingredients, short autobio pieces, and looking at the pictures was such a pleasure. I'd previously read Ha's Almost American Girl, and part of me wishes these two books had been released as one big integrated work. Blended together. But that's me. I imagine the cooks looking at this for actual cooking instruction might be more impatient with a bunch of extra bio stuff. I personally found the character who narrates this book unnecessary and kind of tiresome - I would have like it more without a filter between Ha's voice and our ears. But the illustrations are clean and clear (full color), the more realistically-illustrated chapter pages are gorgeous, and the recipes seem very doable (and delicious). Definitely one I want to keep around the house for a while. Yumm!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jenni

    I want to cook everything in this book. It's a recipe book for people like me, who never grew up cooking because their parents (in my and author's case, mothers) cooked in crazy quantities and in my case, weren't into having anyone help. So cooking became this mysterious art that only truly gifted people could get right. Robin's adorable book is about demystifying everyday cooking and boiling (ha!) recipes down into easy-to-handle and remember tropes that anyone can master in no time. I do make I want to cook everything in this book. It's a recipe book for people like me, who never grew up cooking because their parents (in my and author's case, mothers) cooked in crazy quantities and in my case, weren't into having anyone help. So cooking became this mysterious art that only truly gifted people could get right. Robin's adorable book is about demystifying everyday cooking and boiling (ha!) recipes down into easy-to-handle and remember tropes that anyone can master in no time. I do make really good kimchi at home (and I was surprised at how easy it is once I started making it!) so I am looking forward to extending the kimchi-making joy to other Korean foods that Robin Ha proudly presents with appetizing illustrations. Read it, even just for fun if you have no desire to cook.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Freya

    This recipe book was given to me as a present, and it's a lovely gift for anyone who would like to explore Korean food and culture. Robin Ha starts each chapter (soups, seafood etc.) with a bit of a cultural explanation, and both these explanations and the steps of the recipes and final product are all illustrated by her. I love a cook book with pictures of what the finished product is meant to look like, but it was also so helpful to have pictures of the ingredients and what to do in the steps, This recipe book was given to me as a present, and it's a lovely gift for anyone who would like to explore Korean food and culture. Robin Ha starts each chapter (soups, seafood etc.) with a bit of a cultural explanation, and both these explanations and the steps of the recipes and final product are all illustrated by her. I love a cook book with pictures of what the finished product is meant to look like, but it was also so helpful to have pictures of the ingredients and what to do in the steps, as I might have found some steps confusing only in text. There's a good mix of sweet and savory, spicy and non-spicy recipes in here for variation and taste and I can't wait to start cooking some of this delicious looking 음식 (food)!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andria

    I can't rate this because I didn't really get to try any of the recipes but I loved what I read. My doctor told me to lay off on spicy foods right as I picked this up. But if you're interested in Korean cooking, this is a good one. This is a book that actually contains helpful, instructional graphics. Many graphic cookbooks are simply illustrated. Not so here. (Anyway how does a drawing of what a pineapple looks like help me learn how to cut a pineapple?) I was impressed and hope to return to th I can't rate this because I didn't really get to try any of the recipes but I loved what I read. My doctor told me to lay off on spicy foods right as I picked this up. But if you're interested in Korean cooking, this is a good one. This is a book that actually contains helpful, instructional graphics. Many graphic cookbooks are simply illustrated. Not so here. (Anyway how does a drawing of what a pineapple looks like help me learn how to cut a pineapple?) I was impressed and hope to return to this book soon.

  19. 5 out of 5

    K.

    Loved it! Easy to read and easy to follow with plenty of colorful comic drawings of the preparation process. Definitely one to purchase for my kitchen - I can't wait to try out the 삼계탕 (samgyetang), a ginger chicken soup, this winter! Also, you can never go wrong with a few alcoholic recipes, if you ask me. Loved it! Easy to read and easy to follow with plenty of colorful comic drawings of the preparation process. Definitely one to purchase for my kitchen - I can't wait to try out the 삼계탕 (samgyetang), a ginger chicken soup, this winter! Also, you can never go wrong with a few alcoholic recipes, if you ask me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Libby Lucy

    I really really really love Korean food. However, I’m super intimidated by the complexity of flavors and the variety of ingredients. Ha not only manages to demystify the Korean kitchen, she gives you a little bit of her story and her heart.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    This is super-awesome and cute and well done. I want to try everything here. Unfortunately since we’re under lockdown I can’t go to an Asian grocery right now to find all these ingredients. :( Someday.....

  22. 4 out of 5

    Loz

    Delightful. Bright art and a straightforward voice portray approachable, delicious looking recipes in a very personal way. I loved it!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Marie

    It's a graphic novel filled with Korean recipes. What more could I ask for? It's a graphic novel filled with Korean recipes. What more could I ask for?

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jonatan Billiau

    Beautifully made, endearing art, excellent and simple recipes. Highly recommended introduction to both graphic novels and Korean food.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mbgirl

    Been through this comic book cookbook twice— made gaji Namul last night. Enjoy the simplicity of the layout— fun and yummy! The recipes fit me!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    I just read through this to learn a few things about Korean cuisine, so I'm not sure how the recipes turn out, but I really loved the illustrations!! I just read through this to learn a few things about Korean cuisine, so I'm not sure how the recipes turn out, but I really loved the illustrations!!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Cox

    I really enjoyed this comic book cookbook! It is very well done and the author explains a lot about Korean life and cooking. The recipes are easy to follow and well illustrated.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    This is a really clever idea, and the illustrations are wonderful, but there is not a single recipe in this book that I could cook without totally overhauling my kitchen. I just don't have the storage space for all the Korean cooking staples called for in these recipes. A fun read, all the same. This is a really clever idea, and the illustrations are wonderful, but there is not a single recipe in this book that I could cook without totally overhauling my kitchen. I just don't have the storage space for all the Korean cooking staples called for in these recipes. A fun read, all the same.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    4 stars...I'll give a definitive rating once I buy it and try out the recipes for real! 4 stars...I'll give a definitive rating once I buy it and try out the recipes for real!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Leah Hanley

    4.5 stars for editing- Reading cover to cover I noticed that she probably wrote these recipes in a different order than they are organized in the book, because some later recipes go in-depth on certain instructions and earlier recipes use the same ingredients/techniques/tips but weren't expanded upon. That combined with a spelling error I thought it wasn't quite 5 stars for a cookbook, but couldn't bring myself to offer 4 stars officially because Ha really accomplishes a unique book without sacr 4.5 stars for editing- Reading cover to cover I noticed that she probably wrote these recipes in a different order than they are organized in the book, because some later recipes go in-depth on certain instructions and earlier recipes use the same ingredients/techniques/tips but weren't expanded upon. That combined with a spelling error I thought it wasn't quite 5 stars for a cookbook, but couldn't bring myself to offer 4 stars officially because Ha really accomplishes a unique book without sacrificing quality recipes. I really argue with myself about whether or not I like the format of a comic book cookbook, but ultimately I think I like it. At least I like this one. The recipes are not easy to glance at in practice, but they really allow the cook to get a better understanding of what they're making and how to do it. Reads just as if you are cooking with a friend, and I love that. The recipes themselves are good... she makes it easy to customize to taste or availability of foods. What I've made so far honestly hasn't wowed me, but they are foods that take tweaking to find personal preference. LOVE the full page watercolors at the beginning of each chapter. The comic style intros are both entertaining and informative. Overall, I think this was a brilliant idea, a well-produced book, and a collection of important Korean recipes that have been written after much practice. Highly recommend.

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