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Days of Awe and Wonder: How to Be a Christian in the Twenty-first Century

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Showcasing some of his most enduring and insightful writings, including many previously unpublished works, a concise and illuminating introduction to Marcus J. Borg, the late spokesman for progressive Christianity and one of the most revered and influential theologians of our time. In his acclaimed books, including classics such as Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time, Th Showcasing some of his most enduring and insightful writings, including many previously unpublished works, a concise and illuminating introduction to Marcus J. Borg, the late spokesman for progressive Christianity and one of the most revered and influential theologians of our time. In his acclaimed books, including classics such as Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time, The Heart of Christianity, Speaking Christian, and Convictions, Marcus J. Borg helped shape an enlightened modernist view of Christianity. A leading scholar of the historical Jesus acclaimed for his ability to speak about Christianity in the context of contemporary society, Borg offered profound wisdom and inspiration—a new way of seeing and living the Christian life—for believers, students, and lay readers. Ultimately, he taught us that by developing a deeper understanding of Jesus and the New Testament, we can discover a more authentic way of being. Yet Borg himself was always conscious of a greater truth beyond what he could explain: the wonder of God. Now, two years after the liberal theologian’s death, comes The Days of Awe and Wonder, a selection of his writing, including many never before published works, that explores the Christian faith and what it means to be a Christian in the twenty-first century. Provocative and uplifting, this anthology illuminates Borg’s explorations of the miraculous and wonderful, his understanding of conviction and fulfillment, and his contention that we must keep an open mind and question assumptions and certainties in all our religious journeys.


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Showcasing some of his most enduring and insightful writings, including many previously unpublished works, a concise and illuminating introduction to Marcus J. Borg, the late spokesman for progressive Christianity and one of the most revered and influential theologians of our time. In his acclaimed books, including classics such as Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time, Th Showcasing some of his most enduring and insightful writings, including many previously unpublished works, a concise and illuminating introduction to Marcus J. Borg, the late spokesman for progressive Christianity and one of the most revered and influential theologians of our time. In his acclaimed books, including classics such as Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time, The Heart of Christianity, Speaking Christian, and Convictions, Marcus J. Borg helped shape an enlightened modernist view of Christianity. A leading scholar of the historical Jesus acclaimed for his ability to speak about Christianity in the context of contemporary society, Borg offered profound wisdom and inspiration—a new way of seeing and living the Christian life—for believers, students, and lay readers. Ultimately, he taught us that by developing a deeper understanding of Jesus and the New Testament, we can discover a more authentic way of being. Yet Borg himself was always conscious of a greater truth beyond what he could explain: the wonder of God. Now, two years after the liberal theologian’s death, comes The Days of Awe and Wonder, a selection of his writing, including many never before published works, that explores the Christian faith and what it means to be a Christian in the twenty-first century. Provocative and uplifting, this anthology illuminates Borg’s explorations of the miraculous and wonderful, his understanding of conviction and fulfillment, and his contention that we must keep an open mind and question assumptions and certainties in all our religious journeys.

30 review for Days of Awe and Wonder: How to Be a Christian in the Twenty-first Century

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    I enjoyed reading this book. It felt a bit like Progressive Christianity 101. I sometimes wished that he would have gone a bit deeper theologically on some of the more “controversial” topics, like the divinity/humanity of Jesus, but perhaps this was not the intended purpose of the book. The afterword by Barbara Brown Taylor (the actual eulogy she presented at his memorial service in 2015) was worth the price of the book (to me personally in any case).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    I have read many books by Marcus Borg and this is another excellent book on Christianity. If I ever have a clear understanding of Christianity it will be because of Borg. In this book, he asks us to get rid of our "flat tire" theology and move on to what is important. Borg tells us to listen to our lives and listen to what happens to to us. It is through what happens to us that God speaks. In the end, to be a Christian, we must center in God, be compassionate, and seek justice. I have read many books by Marcus Borg and this is another excellent book on Christianity. If I ever have a clear understanding of Christianity it will be because of Borg. In this book, he asks us to get rid of our "flat tire" theology and move on to what is important. Borg tells us to listen to our lives and listen to what happens to to us. It is through what happens to us that God speaks. In the end, to be a Christian, we must center in God, be compassionate, and seek justice.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Lewton

    I enjoyed these lectures and writings from Borg. It is a broad glimpse at his work, ending with beautiful words from Barbara Brown Taylor. He pushes back against a complacent or intellectual Christianity and invites us deeper into relationship with Christ; a relationship of paying attention.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Melody Riggs

    This is a collection of sermons, interviews, and thoughts from the late theologian, Marcus J. Borg. As I wrestle with different circumstances in my own life and faith, I found some of his words inspiring and helpful. Other things he said, I’m still working through whether or not it’s what I believe.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Keri Frisch

    This book was a revelation for me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ezechel

    I can't agree with half of what the book says, but it was still an interesting read from the point of view that sheds light on some of the reasoning behind progressive Christianity I wasn't really aware of until now, and somehow explains how a pantheist-universalist-syncretistic theologian who sees the spiritual world no different than any new age guru would, and who denies not only the divinity of Jesus but also his uniqueness among "mystics" , can still in good faith call himself a Christian. I can't agree with half of what the book says, but it was still an interesting read from the point of view that sheds light on some of the reasoning behind progressive Christianity I wasn't really aware of until now, and somehow explains how a pantheist-universalist-syncretistic theologian who sees the spiritual world no different than any new age guru would, and who denies not only the divinity of Jesus but also his uniqueness among "mystics" , can still in good faith call himself a Christian. Spoiler alert: main reason is because Christianity "feels like home". Of course it does, I would add, since it has nice cozy buildings, a wealth of art and culture that inspires the educated pretentious mind, and above all it pays a salary. I guess until I've read this book I thought I was some kind of "almost progressive" Christian, just because I rejected some of the fundamentalist values and my evangelical friends often accuse me of being a "liberal". Now I see I am nowhere near to being a "progressive Christian" if this book is a faithful representation of what progressive Christianity is, and I'll probably never be one. That's fine, there's enough room in the middle for people who don't feel the pressure to fall in line on either side.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joe Henry

    Marcus Borg died January 21, 2015, of a disease that typically takes its victims within a few years. Days of Awe and Wonder: How to Be a Christian in the Twenty-First Century is copyright 2017 (published posthumously). Foreword is written by Marianne Borg, his wife, and I expect she was a principal force in organizing the book and getting it published. It is a collection of previously published writings (including three chapter selections from Jesus, A New Vision), selected sermons, lectures, an Marcus Borg died January 21, 2015, of a disease that typically takes its victims within a few years. Days of Awe and Wonder: How to Be a Christian in the Twenty-First Century is copyright 2017 (published posthumously). Foreword is written by Marianne Borg, his wife, and I expect she was a principal force in organizing the book and getting it published. It is a collection of previously published writings (including three chapter selections from Jesus, A New Vision), selected sermons, lectures, and articles. You might call it a "Marcus Borg reader." His last (before he died) book is Convictions: How I Learned What Matters Most, c. 2014. I suspect he knew his prognosis--that his time was limited--and Convictions was his magnum opus; it is also an excellent tour of his thought and exposure to his spirit--his testimony, if you will. I think the book would be an excellent choice for a group study...should stimulate some deep conversation. The Marcus J Borg Foundation was formed (apparently) also in 2017, the same year as copyright for this book, Days of Awe and Wonder. You can find a number of videos there which will give you the opportunity to hear his voice as well as what he has to say. I recommend you listen to at least one to get an appreciation for his gentle, welcoming, engaging spirit, and one video I might recommend is "What is God?" ( https://marcusjborg.org/category/vide...) For more bio on Borg, including photo, see https://marcusjborg.org/about-us/.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Troy

    It was great to have another book to read by Marcus Borg. I was deeply saddened by his passing in 2015 and had missed reading him. The book is a conglomeration of chapters of previously published books, blog posts, and some unpublished lectures and sermons. So, to some degree it felt like a hodge-podge. As many of the items were stand-alone, there is much repetition as Borg laid out some of his basic tenets in each. I think the book would have been more enjoyable had some of this been edited. The It was great to have another book to read by Marcus Borg. I was deeply saddened by his passing in 2015 and had missed reading him. The book is a conglomeration of chapters of previously published books, blog posts, and some unpublished lectures and sermons. So, to some degree it felt like a hodge-podge. As many of the items were stand-alone, there is much repetition as Borg laid out some of his basic tenets in each. I think the book would have been more enjoyable had some of this been edited. The biggest frustration for me was some of the chapters pulled from his book, Jesus: A New Vision. My disappointment lies in the fact 2006's book, Jesus by Borg, was, in Borg's own words, and updating (maybe even correcting) of the earlier book as his views had changed on many things over 20 years. I feel that a fair amount of the information shared in these chapters from the "New Vision" book is what had changed. The book ends with the eulogy shared by Barbara Brown Taylor at Borg's funeral. That was almost worth the cost of the book in itself, especially since I found reading this book, that I was still grieving a person who I had only met briefly on one occasions years ago. So, it was an interesting read, but there was really nothing "new" for me. It was good to "hear" Borg again, if only in a slightly new way, but for the most part, I'd recommend his other books published in his lifetime.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Robert D. Cornwall

    Marcus Borg is one of the best known religious writers of recent decades. Whether one agreed with him or not, he offered gracious and thoughtful responses to important questions of the faith. Now in death comes this book. It is a collection of pieces, some from early books and others from sermons and speeches, revealing his vision of the Christian faith. There isn't really anything new hear, but if you've not read Borg before, then this might be a good place to start. It covers most areas of con Marcus Borg is one of the best known religious writers of recent decades. Whether one agreed with him or not, he offered gracious and thoughtful responses to important questions of the faith. Now in death comes this book. It is a collection of pieces, some from early books and others from sermons and speeches, revealing his vision of the Christian faith. There isn't really anything new hear, but if you've not read Borg before, then this might be a good place to start. It covers most areas of concern, including his vision of Jesus. While I might disagree at a number of points with him theologically, I appreciate his recognition that it is important to find a path. He challenges the idea that it is sufficient to be spiritual without being religious, and by that he means embracing a tradition -- not in an exclusive way, but recognizing that there is value in following a specific tradition. For him, that is Jesus and thus Christianity. I give it three stars, not because I'm ambivalent about the book, but simply because I've read much of his work, and thus this was review not new. But for others, this might be new and thus helpful.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I think I appreciate Borg more in monograph form. Some of these selections seemed redundant--e.g., quite a few of them discussed Jesus' identity as a Jewish mystic, which certainly adds to our understanding of Jesus, but I felt sorta beaten over the head with it. It would have been nice for the selections to each have some introductory text that explained why they were included and what the editors felt they add to the Borg oeuvre. To me the most valuable bit was a response Borg gave to a Q&A: " I think I appreciate Borg more in monograph form. Some of these selections seemed redundant--e.g., quite a few of them discussed Jesus' identity as a Jewish mystic, which certainly adds to our understanding of Jesus, but I felt sorta beaten over the head with it. It would have been nice for the selections to each have some introductory text that explained why they were included and what the editors felt they add to the Borg oeuvre. To me the most valuable bit was a response Borg gave to a Q&A: "Student: I don't get the transforming thing. It isn't just learning and trying to be good or like Jesus, Allah, Buddha, or is it? What is this transformation? I don't have it." Borg's response includes, "The way our relationship to God is nourished is through the very simple act, if you will, of paying attention to that relationship....That can take so many forms [prayer, worship, dream work, journaling]....It's not about trying to be good--it's about seeking to become more and more centered in the reality we name God." (BBT's marvelous afterword reminds us that giving our hearts away is often a byproduct or result of paying attention to that holy relationship.)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Borg is one of the more fascinating theologians and scholars I've read. There are a lot of great things about this collection: I enjoyed the pastoral sincerity with which these writings motivate Christians to critically engage Scripture in crafting a sustainable theology; I did not find myself hating him, or thinking him stupid or ill-founded (all portrayals I have seen, even if they don't use the language I've used); I appreciated his presentation of Christian ethics as rooted in oneness with G Borg is one of the more fascinating theologians and scholars I've read. There are a lot of great things about this collection: I enjoyed the pastoral sincerity with which these writings motivate Christians to critically engage Scripture in crafting a sustainable theology; I did not find myself hating him, or thinking him stupid or ill-founded (all portrayals I have seen, even if they don't use the language I've used); I appreciated his presentation of Christian ethics as rooted in oneness with God, because God is a compassionate sustainer of all existence; and his presentations struck me as non-orthodox (in the sense of traditional Christian doctrine) without being unorthodox (completely antithetical to Christian theology) or purposefully contrarian. I do find his conception of God (e.g. a "more than" panentheistic spirit that is in all things, but that the sum of all things does not contain) outside the "norm" of biblical idiom--whether for good or bad. Still, though I think this, it does not mean the Borg is wrong--just outside the "norm" and in need of further investigation. I am still not convinced by Borg's distinctions between Pre-Easter and Post-Easter Jesus, but I've not read everything by him to get the fullest sense of how he conceived this distinction. My rub comes from a difficulty I have with seeing the Gospels as metaphor. Borg seems to me, in all the places I've read him, unhelpfully vague on what parts are/aren't metaphor and what these metaphors mean for the historical Jesus in whom Christians have faith. I also have trouble with Borg's presentation of Christianity vis-a-vis other world religions, because I'm convinced 1st Century Judaism, in which Jesus operated, was remarkably exclusivist (e.g. YHWH is the only being of his kind and the Jews have the fullest revelation of him). I have a hard time thinking Jesus would not have had that same categoric exclusivist mentality. Still, for the few difficulties I have, this collection is very provocative and worthy of anyone's time reading. Borg is thoroughly consistent in his convictions, and reading him has been a delight as I wrestle with my faith and what it means to be a Christian today.

  12. 5 out of 5

    James

    I like Marcus Borg. I don't trust his Christology. His strong division and lack of correlation between the Pre-Easter Jesus and the Post-Resurrection Christ, and his denial of the Trinity makes his theology deeply flawed, and I still find myself in the same pool with the orthodox Christians. And yet, I like Marcus Borg and have never been bored by reading his books and he illuminates some stuff for me. I appreciate that he wants to look at the historical Jesus, that he saw Jesus as a Spirit pers I like Marcus Borg. I don't trust his Christology. His strong division and lack of correlation between the Pre-Easter Jesus and the Post-Resurrection Christ, and his denial of the Trinity makes his theology deeply flawed, and I still find myself in the same pool with the orthodox Christians. And yet, I like Marcus Borg and have never been bored by reading his books and he illuminates some stuff for me. I appreciate that he wants to look at the historical Jesus, that he saw Jesus as a Spirit person, stamped by the Divine, that he held up Jesus' social concern for the marginalized, and his openness to mystical faith. So well there is so much that he says which I can't go along with, I also find myself impressed and drawn in by aspects of Borg's Christianity. This book was published posthumously and is a patch work of previously published works (in books, blogposts, interviews, sermons, and lectures)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Angela Forfia

    If you’ve read any Marcus Borg, you’ll appreciate this deep collection of his writing, sermons, interviews, questions and answers as well as a moving eulogy that was delivered at his funeral. Because it is a collection of sermons, it can be a little uneven and repetitive at times. (There must be 10 sermons from the Lenten Noonday Preaching Series alone.) If you’ve read his other books, many of the themes will be familiar to you, but I still was struck by some thought provoking ideas. A new appre If you’ve read any Marcus Borg, you’ll appreciate this deep collection of his writing, sermons, interviews, questions and answers as well as a moving eulogy that was delivered at his funeral. Because it is a collection of sermons, it can be a little uneven and repetitive at times. (There must be 10 sermons from the Lenten Noonday Preaching Series alone.) If you’ve read his other books, many of the themes will be familiar to you, but I still was struck by some thought provoking ideas. A new appreciation of the importance of the cross for one—as a New Thought church member, we’re more Easter morning than Good Friday focused. But what will stick with me is a line in the eulogy that God is “minimal protection and maximum support.” Nice audio book option as so much of the writing was intended as sermons...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Liz Krieger

    I read this book as part of an eight-week study as a member of a study group comprised of liberal Christians. Marcus Borg was a Progressive Christian theologian. Although I do not agree with him on every point I love his writing style, which is simple enough to be understood by the average lay person yet filled with wonderful statements that resonate with so many people on so many levels. This book was a compilation of his most noteworthy sermons and articles followed by the eulogy presented at I read this book as part of an eight-week study as a member of a study group comprised of liberal Christians. Marcus Borg was a Progressive Christian theologian. Although I do not agree with him on every point I love his writing style, which is simple enough to be understood by the average lay person yet filled with wonderful statements that resonate with so many people on so many levels. This book was a compilation of his most noteworthy sermons and articles followed by the eulogy presented at the memorial service for Marcus Borg in 2015 at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Portland, Oregon. Borg’s Christian philosophy can be summed up with this simple statement: God’s passion is that we center our lives in God as known in the Bible and through Jesus Christ, living with compassion and love, seeking social justice throughout the world.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    I already loved Marcus Borg from having read a few of his books. This book was like getting to know him. With each chapter I felt like I was there with him speaking to me. The chapters consist of excerpts from books and more from his sermons and lectures. I felt his love for those he was speaking to, and for me. He shares his experience and not doctrine, though he does tell us about doctrine, just that doctrine is not Christianity. There is a lot of repetition in the book, though it is presented I already loved Marcus Borg from having read a few of his books. This book was like getting to know him. With each chapter I felt like I was there with him speaking to me. The chapters consist of excerpts from books and more from his sermons and lectures. I felt his love for those he was speaking to, and for me. He shares his experience and not doctrine, though he does tell us about doctrine, just that doctrine is not Christianity. There is a lot of repetition in the book, though it is presented differently each time. Here might be a good place to get the main ideas and personality of Borg. At the end is a eulogy given by Barbara Brown Taylor. She sums up much of who he was and what he said in her own witty, wonderful way. I highly recommend this book, maybe especially to those who want to understand more of Jesus without someone trying to convert them.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eileen

    Finally, not a boring book on Christianity. I think Marcus Borg cleared up alot of haze on my poor understanding on Christianity. Growing up as a Christian, and then neglecting it for more than 10 years, and now returning to the Church brings up more questions than ever. This book breaks in down into so many aspects of my learning and believing and being convinced and being decided to wait upon the Lord. Thinking of my childhood bible stories seems so real metaphorically today. Read this book if Finally, not a boring book on Christianity. I think Marcus Borg cleared up alot of haze on my poor understanding on Christianity. Growing up as a Christian, and then neglecting it for more than 10 years, and now returning to the Church brings up more questions than ever. This book breaks in down into so many aspects of my learning and believing and being convinced and being decided to wait upon the Lord. Thinking of my childhood bible stories seems so real metaphorically today. Read this book if you just need some trimming and mending in your Christian walk.

  17. 4 out of 5

    William Westmoreland

    Awe and Wonder Marcus Borg is a Wonder. His awe filled faith haas shaped a generation of believers setting us free from the things that would bind us, opening the way to deeper, awe-filled faith in the ground of our being, God. His candor and reasoning resonate with faith and understanding, igniting us to come and feast on the living word, the word revealed in Scripture and in the divine revelation that we know as Jesus, the Messiah, the messenger, the incarnate word. I give this last collection Awe and Wonder Marcus Borg is a Wonder. His awe filled faith haas shaped a generation of believers setting us free from the things that would bind us, opening the way to deeper, awe-filled faith in the ground of our being, God. His candor and reasoning resonate with faith and understanding, igniting us to come and feast on the living word, the word revealed in Scripture and in the divine revelation that we know as Jesus, the Messiah, the messenger, the incarnate word. I give this last collection of sermons and essays 5 Stars. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

  18. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    This is a series of lectures and sermons from the late Episcopalian theologian Marcus Borg. Highly readable in chapter at a time bites. My church group, which I have been meeting with for 8 years and who have become friends and strong support, selects each book and we frequently return to Borg. His last chapters written just before his death and his wife's ending chapter are very moving. Borg didn't have a "good" death as much as he prepared himself for a peaceful step into the great unknown. This is a series of lectures and sermons from the late Episcopalian theologian Marcus Borg. Highly readable in chapter at a time bites. My church group, which I have been meeting with for 8 years and who have become friends and strong support, selects each book and we frequently return to Borg. His last chapters written just before his death and his wife's ending chapter are very moving. Borg didn't have a "good" death as much as he prepared himself for a peaceful step into the great unknown.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pearl Loewen

    I love anything Marcus Borg wrote. This book was compiled posthumously, and as its contents were drawn from numerous sources (books, sermons, etc.), it doesn't flow quite as well as some of his other books, along with some inevitable repetition. Still, a great book that reveals much of Borg's character, compassion, and wisdom. Barbara Brown Taylor's eulogy in the afterward was so touching. And I am thankful that Marianne Borg is keeping the conversation going. I love anything Marcus Borg wrote. This book was compiled posthumously, and as its contents were drawn from numerous sources (books, sermons, etc.), it doesn't flow quite as well as some of his other books, along with some inevitable repetition. Still, a great book that reveals much of Borg's character, compassion, and wisdom. Barbara Brown Taylor's eulogy in the afterward was so touching. And I am thankful that Marianne Borg is keeping the conversation going.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    A challenging book of ideas and convictions. Some chapters were wonderful, full of possibilities and new ways of reading or understanding the Bible, as well as learning and appreciating other faiths and perspectives. Yet a chapter or two also that raised red flags. These came across to me as "cherry picking" verses and passages to prove a point or two, yet ignoring or not addressing other portions that would stand in contrast to the verses used. I'm glad to have read it. A challenging book of ideas and convictions. Some chapters were wonderful, full of possibilities and new ways of reading or understanding the Bible, as well as learning and appreciating other faiths and perspectives. Yet a chapter or two also that raised red flags. These came across to me as "cherry picking" verses and passages to prove a point or two, yet ignoring or not addressing other portions that would stand in contrast to the verses used. I'm glad to have read it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Christianson

    A book I could only recommend as a cautionary tale. I feel that the author was attempting to respond to postmodern thought, and as a result he decoupled from the core of the gospels; instead replacing it with his own rational capacities. His intellect is unquestionably sharp, but I believe he only created an easy bridge for anyone to journey across from being a follower of Jesus to embracing therapeutic moralistic deism centered around subjective thought.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Julia Walker

    If you have not read any of Marcus Borg's books then please do so, you will not regret it. If you ahve then by all means add this to your list. With his usual simplistic but effective style Borg explains what it means to actually be a Christian during this very different time period in the history of Christianity. Remarkable book by one of my all time favorite authors. If you have not read any of Marcus Borg's books then please do so, you will not regret it. If you ahve then by all means add this to your list. With his usual simplistic but effective style Borg explains what it means to actually be a Christian during this very different time period in the history of Christianity. Remarkable book by one of my all time favorite authors.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    I’ve been intrigued by Marcus for quite some time. The title of this book is pretty misleading. I wasn’t experiencing awe and wonder at all. This book was interesting at worst and provoking at best. There was much of the book that wasn’t my cup of tea theologically. If you’re looking for an interesting read, this is one. Not one I’d particularly recommend to anyone.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    Marcus Borg is always refreshing. The way he gets at the heart of the matter is illuminating. i am glad that he was never afraid to dream out loud or believe with both his heart and his mind rather than just his will. This collection of topics from sermons and other writings is a great collection. It ends with a Eulogy by Barbara Brown Taylor.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Funk

    Loved this beautiful little book of gems! While I don't agree with quite everything that Marcus Borg says, his immense faith and love for God shines through each page. Full of wisdom and intelligence, and above all...passionate love. I also loved the introduction/forward written by Marianne Borg. Well done. Loved this beautiful little book of gems! While I don't agree with quite everything that Marcus Borg says, his immense faith and love for God shines through each page. Full of wisdom and intelligence, and above all...passionate love. I also loved the introduction/forward written by Marianne Borg. Well done.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Frodo

    I read this book by Marcus Borg in connection with our Sunday Morning Class at church. This has been a marvelous reading experience because of all the conversations it has provided us. While I don't agree with everything Dr. Borg has presented, I am deeply affected by his commentary and continue to wrestle with some of his ideas regarding God's activity and presence. I read this book by Marcus Borg in connection with our Sunday Morning Class at church. This has been a marvelous reading experience because of all the conversations it has provided us. While I don't agree with everything Dr. Borg has presented, I am deeply affected by his commentary and continue to wrestle with some of his ideas regarding God's activity and presence.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    This man's work has inspired me over and over to be a Christian. His reading of the gospels, his gift for putting them in context, and his love for the person of Jesus without ignoring his mystical gifts, teaching power, or living example for how we should live our lives, inspire me every time I encounter them. This man's work has inspired me over and over to be a Christian. His reading of the gospels, his gift for putting them in context, and his love for the person of Jesus without ignoring his mystical gifts, teaching power, or living example for how we should live our lives, inspire me every time I encounter them.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    I was not really into this book at first - it is a compilation of some of Borg's sermons and previous thoughts - HOWEVER, the last 2 chapters are life-changing and PROFOUND - I am SO GRATEFUL I DID NOT STOP READING THIS ONE!!!!! ALL FOLLOWERS OF GOD AND JESUS MUST READ AND UNDERSTAND THE LAST 2 CHAPTERS I was not really into this book at first - it is a compilation of some of Borg's sermons and previous thoughts - HOWEVER, the last 2 chapters are life-changing and PROFOUND - I am SO GRATEFUL I DID NOT STOP READING THIS ONE!!!!! ALL FOLLOWERS OF GOD AND JESUS MUST READ AND UNDERSTAND THE LAST 2 CHAPTERS

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    This is a compilation of Borg's sermons, speeches and excerpts from books that was published after his death. It concludes with the eulogy delivered Barbara Brown Taylor. There's nothing new here but it's always refreshing to revist Borg's views. This might be a good introduction to Borg if you've never read anything by him. This is a compilation of Borg's sermons, speeches and excerpts from books that was published after his death. It concludes with the eulogy delivered Barbara Brown Taylor. There's nothing new here but it's always refreshing to revist Borg's views. This might be a good introduction to Borg if you've never read anything by him.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kent Dickerson

    This book has nothing to do with Christianity. The author applied Eastern mysticism and philosophy to his faith after rejecting real Christianity. Do not be deceived, Eastern religious thought and meditation have no place in the Christian faith and will lead you down the wrong path of rejecting the real Jesus.

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