Hot Best Seller

Popular Tales of the West Highlands, Volumes I - IV (Four-volume collection of Scottish folklore translated from Gaelic)

Availability: Ready to download

Volume I This volume has many stories which have been anthologized elsewhere, as well as the extensive introduction which not only serves to introduce Scottish folklore, but as a prolegomena to the study of oral folklore in general. Volume II This volume is a continuation of the same sort of material in volume I, presenting folklore which has themes and motifs similar to oth Volume I This volume has many stories which have been anthologized elsewhere, as well as the extensive introduction which not only serves to introduce Scottish folklore, but as a prolegomena to the study of oral folklore in general. Volume II This volume is a continuation of the same sort of material in volume I, presenting folklore which has themes and motifs similar to other northern European traditions (and, of course, world folklore), albeit in a Scottish setting. Towards the end Campbell includes two unique tales, The Fair Gruagach, Son of the King of Eirinn, and The Knight of the Red Shield. These appear to be true remnants of ancient Celtic or pre-Celtic mythopoetic texts, and have a narrative structure and prose style that are radically different than previous material. Also of interest are the endnotes to The Smith and the Fairies, (see this and following files), which have a summary of the regional Fairy lore of West Scotland. Volume III This volume is less 'fairy tale' oriented than the previous two volumes, and includes several significant pieces of poetry, including the The Lay of the Diarmaid, The Yellow Muilearteach, The Lay of the Great Fool, and the The Lay of Osgar. These have been transcribed in both English and Gaelic, and the Gaelic text of these lays is included in the etext. The longest tale so far, the Story of Conall Gulban, is found in this volume. Also of interest are the (fairly transparent) pagan mythological themes in many of the pieces in this volume. Volume IV This volume is essentially an extended appendix to the previous three volumes, containing commentary, documentation, and analysis, particularly a rousing defense of Scottish poetry, art, music, dress, and the Gaelic language. At the time had Scotland been subdued by Britain for several centuries, and was considered a backwards, peripheral area without much in the way of culture, and one of Campbell's goals was to provide a counterweight to this chauvinism. He has only dropped hints about this in the previous three volumes--now the gloves come off.


Compare

Volume I This volume has many stories which have been anthologized elsewhere, as well as the extensive introduction which not only serves to introduce Scottish folklore, but as a prolegomena to the study of oral folklore in general. Volume II This volume is a continuation of the same sort of material in volume I, presenting folklore which has themes and motifs similar to oth Volume I This volume has many stories which have been anthologized elsewhere, as well as the extensive introduction which not only serves to introduce Scottish folklore, but as a prolegomena to the study of oral folklore in general. Volume II This volume is a continuation of the same sort of material in volume I, presenting folklore which has themes and motifs similar to other northern European traditions (and, of course, world folklore), albeit in a Scottish setting. Towards the end Campbell includes two unique tales, The Fair Gruagach, Son of the King of Eirinn, and The Knight of the Red Shield. These appear to be true remnants of ancient Celtic or pre-Celtic mythopoetic texts, and have a narrative structure and prose style that are radically different than previous material. Also of interest are the endnotes to The Smith and the Fairies, (see this and following files), which have a summary of the regional Fairy lore of West Scotland. Volume III This volume is less 'fairy tale' oriented than the previous two volumes, and includes several significant pieces of poetry, including the The Lay of the Diarmaid, The Yellow Muilearteach, The Lay of the Great Fool, and the The Lay of Osgar. These have been transcribed in both English and Gaelic, and the Gaelic text of these lays is included in the etext. The longest tale so far, the Story of Conall Gulban, is found in this volume. Also of interest are the (fairly transparent) pagan mythological themes in many of the pieces in this volume. Volume IV This volume is essentially an extended appendix to the previous three volumes, containing commentary, documentation, and analysis, particularly a rousing defense of Scottish poetry, art, music, dress, and the Gaelic language. At the time had Scotland been subdued by Britain for several centuries, and was considered a backwards, peripheral area without much in the way of culture, and one of Campbell's goals was to provide a counterweight to this chauvinism. He has only dropped hints about this in the previous three volumes--now the gloves come off.

31 review for Popular Tales of the West Highlands, Volumes I - IV (Four-volume collection of Scottish folklore translated from Gaelic)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jillian M. Smith

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  3. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Melvin

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marcelo Terres

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lady Kim

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lili Mtz

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kat

  8. 5 out of 5

    John Lundquist

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sara Burnett

  10. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Michael Bockman

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patrick A. Coulter

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laureen Pew

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  14. 4 out of 5

    Pat K. Jones

  15. 4 out of 5

    Heather Kaminski

  16. 5 out of 5

    David C Sinclair

  17. 5 out of 5

    Glinsky

  18. 5 out of 5

    Donald W. McKay

  19. 5 out of 5

    Corrin

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bowie Stevens

  21. 4 out of 5

    Veronika

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zere

  23. 5 out of 5

    Анастасия Осьмушина

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angela Kocheshkova

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Charlesworth

  26. 5 out of 5

    Doug Graves

  27. 4 out of 5

    NUADH DENIM

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Mellor

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Wilson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  31. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Figgins

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...