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No Fairy Tale: The reality of a girl who wasn't a princess and her poetry

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You are invited into D.L. Finn's life, written through a princess’s viewpoint. While it’s usually assumed in fairy tales that the princess is beloved by all, this is one princess who doesn't feel loved. She dreams of a moment when her father will walk through the castle door, sweep her up in his arms and proclaim how much he misses her. That never happens. Instead, she is You are invited into D.L. Finn's life, written through a princess’s viewpoint. While it’s usually assumed in fairy tales that the princess is beloved by all, this is one princess who doesn't feel loved. She dreams of a moment when her father will walk through the castle door, sweep her up in his arms and proclaim how much he misses her. That never happens. Instead, she is introduced to a new step family. Just like in the fairy tales, this is where the story takes a dark twist; where addiction, abuse and adolescence thrive together in retched misery. From her lowest point as a hopeless fourteen-year-old girl who gives up all hope-- comes a spark of faith. This is where she begins her quest for a happy ending Although the princess ends her very real fairy tale, D.L. Finn steps in and shares her thoughts, poetry and photographs. This entire narrative is the author’s reality from childhood through adulthood. She maintains the privacy of those involved while hanging on to her truth. 2016 New Apple Annual Book Awards"Official Selection" in the Memoir category!


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You are invited into D.L. Finn's life, written through a princess’s viewpoint. While it’s usually assumed in fairy tales that the princess is beloved by all, this is one princess who doesn't feel loved. She dreams of a moment when her father will walk through the castle door, sweep her up in his arms and proclaim how much he misses her. That never happens. Instead, she is You are invited into D.L. Finn's life, written through a princess’s viewpoint. While it’s usually assumed in fairy tales that the princess is beloved by all, this is one princess who doesn't feel loved. She dreams of a moment when her father will walk through the castle door, sweep her up in his arms and proclaim how much he misses her. That never happens. Instead, she is introduced to a new step family. Just like in the fairy tales, this is where the story takes a dark twist; where addiction, abuse and adolescence thrive together in retched misery. From her lowest point as a hopeless fourteen-year-old girl who gives up all hope-- comes a spark of faith. This is where she begins her quest for a happy ending Although the princess ends her very real fairy tale, D.L. Finn steps in and shares her thoughts, poetry and photographs. This entire narrative is the author’s reality from childhood through adulthood. She maintains the privacy of those involved while hanging on to her truth. 2016 New Apple Annual Book Awards"Official Selection" in the Memoir category!

56 review for No Fairy Tale: The reality of a girl who wasn't a princess and her poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Irma *Irma The Book Whisperer*

    ... when you start reading and than you find those beautiful poems inside... I enjoyed them very much.

  2. 4 out of 5

    D.E.

    This is an unusual style book – the first half being a memoir while the second is a collection of poetry and photography. The memoir section of the book is told in an imaginative way by giving it a fairy tale setting – the lead character (and author of the book) is played as a princess, but sadly her castle is not the happy home of many fairy tale princesses and she struggles through many difficulties before we can claim that ‘happy ending’ we do so desire. As with most memoirs, particularly those This is an unusual style book – the first half being a memoir while the second is a collection of poetry and photography. The memoir section of the book is told in an imaginative way by giving it a fairy tale setting – the lead character (and author of the book) is played as a princess, but sadly her castle is not the happy home of many fairy tale princesses and she struggles through many difficulties before we can claim that ‘happy ending’ we do so desire. As with most memoirs, particularly those written by “ordinary” people, I find it a brave step to share your innermost secrets and to allow strangers into the darkest corners of your world. This poor princess certainly has a difficult start in life, faced with issues such as abuse, alcoholism, teenage rebellion, combined with medical issues as she becomes an adult but we are left feeling that she comes out of the other side of it stronger for each experience. It might not be the best written memoir but it has a grittiness that really speaks to you. The second half of the book is a collection of differently styled poems, scattered with several photographs. Some of the poems have a real connection back to the memoir, while others are less specifically reflective. A couple I really enjoyed were The Bearded Old Man and Reader (I’m sure all authors will recognise the sentiments in the latter of those!) This book is certainly worth reading and deserves my four stars

  3. 4 out of 5

    Yvette Calleiro

    This book was broken into three sections. I'm going to start with the last section of this book. I LOVED the poetry! Maybe because a lot of it focused on the ocean or nature and I love those topics, I found the poetry beautiful and easy to appreciate. I loved the imagery that the author used and the emotion/passion that she emits through her words. If this book had only been poetry, I would have given it five stars. The first half of the book was difficult for me. I was excited about it because I This book was broken into three sections. I'm going to start with the last section of this book. I LOVED the poetry! Maybe because a lot of it focused on the ocean or nature and I love those topics, I found the poetry beautiful and easy to appreciate. I loved the imagery that the author used and the emotion/passion that she emits through her words. If this book had only been poetry, I would have given it five stars. The first half of the book was difficult for me. I was excited about it because I loved the idea of a fairy tale that wasn't so fairy tale-ish. The problem for me was that I couldn't lose myself in the story because it didn't read like a story (to me). I felt as it if was a retelling of a story instead of the story itself; there was more tell than show. That being said, that is just my preference in styles. When the author finished her "story," she switched to first person, and I could really connect to that part of the book. I finally felt that there was a voice, and I think that is what I felt was missing at the beginning. This author has been through more trauma than anyone should have to experience in any lifetime, and I applaud her courage to share her story. I do believe it's a book worth reading, especially for the beautiful poetry at the end.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Fiza Pathan

    I loved this book. D.L.Finn has written a powerful memoir of her life in the form of a fairy tale that captures the attention of her readers & is wonderful to read. I loved the unique style of writing this memoir in the form of a fairy tale where D.L.Finn is a princess & yet not a princess. The author excels in telling the story of her life in an easy to read manner that is commendable. The tale of her growing up with a difficult mother, a violent stepfather & a rogue stepbrother is heartbreakin I loved this book. D.L.Finn has written a powerful memoir of her life in the form of a fairy tale that captures the attention of her readers & is wonderful to read. I loved the unique style of writing this memoir in the form of a fairy tale where D.L.Finn is a princess & yet not a princess. The author excels in telling the story of her life in an easy to read manner that is commendable. The tale of her growing up with a difficult mother, a violent stepfather & a rogue stepbrother is heartbreaking & yet full of inspiration. This book inspires the reader to not give up on our reality & to truly love ourselves in spite of the various negative forces in our world. I loved the poems in the book 'No Fairy Tale'. D.L.Finn is a highly gifted poet & I just was totally mesmerized by her amazing poems about nature, love, her past, her sorrow, her children, her pets, her husband etc. Some of my favorite poems in this book are 'Fear', 'I Know', 'Valentine Kittens', 'Reader', 'The Door', 'Trees', 'Senses', 'Love Stories' & 'The Green God'. Did you like the sound of these titles ? Then what are you waiting for, buy your copy of D.L.Finn's memoir 'No Fairy Tale' today. If you are looking for a memoir with poems that is enlivening then read this book. If you are looking for an unusual but beautifully penned memoir then this is the book for you. If you are feeling depressed, lonely & sad about your past & want to read a memoir which will make you see the positive side of life then get your copy of 'No Fairy Tale' by D.L.Finn today. I enjoyed reading & contemplating on this book. I especially loved the poems in this book, especially the ones about a stray cat being befriended by the author. I hope to read more books by D.L.Finn in the near future. Kudos to her on a job well done. Support D.L.Finn & her book. Happy reading to all!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maretha Botha

    Hope Expressed In Poetry I won a beautiful paperback copy of "No Fairy Tale ..." This flawlessly written memoir is different in format from others which I've read before and it was not an easy read. It was painful, honest, written with raw emotion and honesty. Through the Princess' eyes the reader learns about family violence, drinking, shouting and screaming - really what it is like to live in a very unhappy, abusive home. I fully understand now why the author spoke of herself in the third perso Hope Expressed In Poetry I won a beautiful paperback copy of "No Fairy Tale ..." This flawlessly written memoir is different in format from others which I've read before and it was not an easy read. It was painful, honest, written with raw emotion and honesty. Through the Princess' eyes the reader learns about family violence, drinking, shouting and screaming - really what it is like to live in a very unhappy, abusive home. I fully understand now why the author spoke of herself in the third person - some memories are too painful and are easier expressed in this way. I felt at times that because of these extremely painful emotions, she was telling more than showing the reader only a few small glimpses from her early life, but all this changed in the poem section where she holds nothing back. A few of my personal favourites are: OCEAN - "I walk on in deep peace That I can only feel at the ocean. My family chases the waves With squeals and glee. I smile. Alone, I meditate In silent breaths I open myself to the wonder ..." Also "Another World" and "Dive"; And "I Know" - "So much to do, So much to see, So many people need us. But the most important person who needs us ... is us. We tend to forget about us." Then ICE BEAUTY and SNOW - thoughts and prose in harmony; also SENSES - a personal favourite. If you love treasured innermost thoughts expressed by means of poetry, I highly recommend becoming familiar with each poem. I'm sure you will find your very own favourites. I am privileged to have the gifted paperback copy and I've had opportunity to read many of my favourite poems by D.L. Finn again during the stormy weather we're experiencing at present. Her poems about the ocean have struck a real connection with me and I no doubt will continue to reread them many times.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shirley

    PROFOUND DECEPTION! That title just about sums up what this individual went through. The main character, referred to as Princess, speaks in third person, and it added to the awkwardness of the read. And then she jumps to first person, a few chapters into the story, which makes for a more interesting and easier read. I think she was having an ‘out of body’ experience when she sat down to write it because she was telling it from two different perspectives. The story was based on real life experience PROFOUND DECEPTION! That title just about sums up what this individual went through. The main character, referred to as Princess, speaks in third person, and it added to the awkwardness of the read. And then she jumps to first person, a few chapters into the story, which makes for a more interesting and easier read. I think she was having an ‘out of body’ experience when she sat down to write it because she was telling it from two different perspectives. The story was based on real life experiences and she was able to take the reader right along with her. I would have liked to have gotten to know her stepfather because she was able to forgive him in his later years. I don’t think I could have done that to the degree that she did. Her mother was another case altogether and didn’t deserve to be called a mother. Her stepbrother’s character was equally sketchy and learning a little bit more about him would have helped. Or maybe she wanted to blot out everything she ever knew about all of them. From what she revealed, I can understand why. Then she took another section and devoted it to poetry. I’m not a fan of poetry but I did like some of the one’s she wrote. I loved “Hello” and loved the way she told it. So true to the form of life. We go through the niceties of greeting one another, always saying we will get together, but it never happens because life gets in the way. “Buried in Fear” just shows how we let others control us and create the insecurities we are feeling. We need to trust our own judgment and we will be better off. It seems as if the author is yelling out for help throughout the story. Its theme comes up again and again. The author brought me in and I felt that she was able to make me feel her spiritual pain, right down to the physical ailments she suffered. She was a fighter…she never gave up, and was always trying to improve herself. I give this book 4 stars because of how the author chose to write the story. It made for a bit of confusion in my mind just like it seemed to be in hers. But wait! Maybe that was her way of revealing her confusion. If so, then she is brilliant! In the end, that connection to truth is really what it is all about.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Ducey

    As a writer, I have immense respect for fellow writers who share their personal journeys and challenges with the sole intent to help ease the burdens of others. In No Fairy Tale: The reality of a girl who wasn't a princess and her poetry, Author D.L. Finn opens and reveals her heart in this most personal memoir. The book’s format is very unique, and I really enjoyed it. The first part is told in third-person narrative and the author refers to herself as the princess. The second part is told in f As a writer, I have immense respect for fellow writers who share their personal journeys and challenges with the sole intent to help ease the burdens of others. In No Fairy Tale: The reality of a girl who wasn't a princess and her poetry, Author D.L. Finn opens and reveals her heart in this most personal memoir. The book’s format is very unique, and I really enjoyed it. The first part is told in third-person narrative and the author refers to herself as the princess. The second part is told in first-person narrative. This is where I felt fully engaged with the author’s plight and her extraordinary journey. She reveals her fragility, but we also witness a strength and soulful spirit that is a true manifestation born of adversity and heartache. The final element of the book is a beautiful, soothing collection of poetry. There is such tranquil beauty found in these exquisite poems. Many of the poems speak of nature’s precious jewels. It’s impossible not to feel transformed in some way. There is beauty all around us, but to appreciate it, our hearts must be open. This is a gift for readers, and one I highly recommend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Ducey

    As a writer, I have immense respect for fellow writers who share their personal journeys and challenges with the sole intent to help ease the burdens of others. In No Fairy Tale: The reality of a girl who wasn't a princess and her poetry, Author D.L. Finn opens and reveals her heart in this most personal memoir. The book’s format is very unique, and I really enjoyed it. The first part is told in third-person narrative and the author refers to herself as the princess. The second part is told in f As a writer, I have immense respect for fellow writers who share their personal journeys and challenges with the sole intent to help ease the burdens of others. In No Fairy Tale: The reality of a girl who wasn't a princess and her poetry, Author D.L. Finn opens and reveals her heart in this most personal memoir. The book’s format is very unique, and I really enjoyed it. The first part is told in third-person narrative and the author refers to herself as the princess. The second part is told in first-person narrative. This is where I felt fully engaged with the author’s plight and her extraordinary journey. She reveals her fragility, but we also witness a strength and soulful spirit that is a true manifestation born of adversity and heartache. The final element of the book is a beautiful, soothing collection of poetry. There is such tranquil beauty found in these exquisite poems. Many of the poems speak of nature’s precious jewels. It’s impossible not to feel transformed in some way. There is beauty all around us, but to appreciate it, our hearts must be open. This is a gift for readers, and one I highly recommend.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mae Clair

    No Fairy Tale takes a look at the author’s life from childhood to adulthood and the struggles inherent along the way. What makes this memoir unique is that the author chooses to tell it in third person substituting a “princess” for herself throughout the narrative. I was initially wary of reading this, knowing it would touch on issues of abuse, something I have a hard time reading about. But the narrative is so strong and heartfelt, it’s impossible not to be caught up in the writing. The journey No Fairy Tale takes a look at the author’s life from childhood to adulthood and the struggles inherent along the way. What makes this memoir unique is that the author chooses to tell it in third person substituting a “princess” for herself throughout the narrative. I was initially wary of reading this, knowing it would touch on issues of abuse, something I have a hard time reading about. But the narrative is so strong and heartfelt, it’s impossible not to be caught up in the writing. The journey is rewarding, especially seeing how the author grows and is able to find peace, not only in her life, but with those around her. The second half of the book is devoted to poetry. Reading through these, the mood often conveys what the writer was experiencing in her life at that point. Some are beautiful, others sad and dark. My favorites are Meadow, Valentine Kittens and Get Old. Well written, No Fairy Tale, has the capability of aiding others in similar situations to rise above circumstance. 4.5 Stars

  10. 5 out of 5

    Beem Weeks

    There’s a line in this book: “It’s a journey about losing faith, only to find it again in places one never thought to look.” This line sums up D. L. Finn’s unique mixture of memoir and poetry collection. But this isn’t a typical memoir. The struggles and victories are all based in the realty of the author’s life. However, Finn tells her story through the voice of a fictional princess. This third person telling leads readers through years of troubling abuse and struggles the author faced, before e There’s a line in this book: “It’s a journey about losing faith, only to find it again in places one never thought to look.” This line sums up D. L. Finn’s unique mixture of memoir and poetry collection. But this isn’t a typical memoir. The struggles and victories are all based in the realty of the author’s life. However, Finn tells her story through the voice of a fictional princess. This third person telling leads readers through years of troubling abuse and struggles the author faced, before eventually finding life, love, and serenity. It’s the poetry that really stands as a testament to the writer’s soul here. The word-play sets moods and scenes that remain with the reader long after the book is returned to the shelf. This is one of those books I’m glad I own in paperback. I like the idea of picking it up, opening to a random page, and finding a gem that paints a fantastic picture. And speaking of pictures, the author has included some of her camera work. That’s a trifecta of skill: writer, poet, photographer. This makes for a winning combination.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I enjoyed this collection. The autobiographical information added to the poetry. There were some poems you could tell when in her life she had written them. I really enjoyed the pictures as well. My favorite poems were, "Ocean Song," "Waterfall," "Colors," "A Winter Night," "Summer," Moonwalk: July 20, 1969," "Time," "Love Stories," "Beautiful," "Show Me!," "Held You," "Magic," "Reader," "Fear," and "Underwater World". I enjoyed this collection. The autobiographical information added to the poetry. There were some poems you could tell when in her life she had written them. I really enjoyed the pictures as well. My favorite poems were, "Ocean Song," "Waterfall," "Colors," "A Winter Night," "Summer," Moonwalk: July 20, 1969," "Time," "Love Stories," "Beautiful," "Show Me!," "Held You," "Magic," "Reader," "Fear," and "Underwater World".

  12. 5 out of 5

    Harmony Kent

    This is a memoir with a difference. First of all, in the first part of the book, the narrative is presented in third-person viewpoint, through the eyes of a young princess, who dreams the usual little-girl dreams and just wants to feel loved. The writer has experienced a lot of trauma and heartache, as well as emotional, psychological, and physical abuse, and writes about this sensitively. At some points, it reads as telling rather than showing, but to be honest, I feel that if it showed more, i This is a memoir with a difference. First of all, in the first part of the book, the narrative is presented in third-person viewpoint, through the eyes of a young princess, who dreams the usual little-girl dreams and just wants to feel loved. The writer has experienced a lot of trauma and heartache, as well as emotional, psychological, and physical abuse, and writes about this sensitively. At some points, it reads as telling rather than showing, but to be honest, I feel that if it showed more, it would make for an impossibly difficult read. The second difference lies in the fact that the book then breaks into part two, which contains poetry and photography, and in this section, the writer lays herself bare. In each part of the book, I feel that the author has given enough to get across what she needs to without overwhelming either herself or her readers, and for me, the whole 'princess-with-royal-parents' thing serves to put a young girl's slant on life events and emotions. This imagery is dropped at an appropriate age. All in all, I found this to be a moving and enjoyable read, and the poetry at the end a real gift. I like that the memoir avoids giving the reader a formula for what works and how things should be, but rather allows them to make up their own mind and explore options for themselves. It gets a solid 4 out of 5 stars from me and I highly recommend this read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kalin

    A deeply personal yet universal book. Written with much honesty, No Fairy Tale is at times sad and at times inspiring, offering valuable lessons but never falling in the trap of being preachy. It's a book about coping, forgiving, letting go and finding peace. The author takes you to an enriching and cathartic journey that wouldn't leave anyone indifferent. A deeply personal yet universal book. Written with much honesty, No Fairy Tale is at times sad and at times inspiring, offering valuable lessons but never falling in the trap of being preachy. It's a book about coping, forgiving, letting go and finding peace. The author takes you to an enriching and cathartic journey that wouldn't leave anyone indifferent.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Balroop Singh

    No Fairy Tale by D.L. Finn is divided into two parts. In the first half she shares the story of her life and the second half comprises of her poems, most of which reiterate the story that has been shared in the first part of the book. It is shuddering that a seven year old little girl felt abandoned by her own mother and tried to survive on her own, hiding in her room, terrified by the “storms that raged between her stepfather and stepbrother.” Lack of proper food and affection, physical and emo No Fairy Tale by D.L. Finn is divided into two parts. In the first half she shares the story of her life and the second half comprises of her poems, most of which reiterate the story that has been shared in the first part of the book. It is shuddering that a seven year old little girl felt abandoned by her own mother and tried to survive on her own, hiding in her room, terrified by the “storms that raged between her stepfather and stepbrother.” Lack of proper food and affection, physical and emotional abuse left indelible marks on the psyche of a child who drifts into the world of alcohol and drugs to assuage her hurts. She even attempts suicide and couldn’t accomplish her ambition of becoming a marine biologist. Diane’s story highlights the consequences of irresponsible parenting and the topsy-turvy journey of a girl who slowly learned to cope with the challenges of life. Kudos to her for sharing the darkest aspects of her life and emerging from those setbacks despite the medical issues she has to deal with. A valuable lesson that she shares: “how good or bad one had it while growing up, every adult has to work to do on themselves, in one way or another. Being happy takes work; being unhappy does not.” The poems in this book further illustrate her story with powerful imagery: “I ate the words that you gave me.” Nature has been used to describe her journey: “You can flow by or cling to a slimy rock, sink deep into stagnant swamp. There are always many choices.” ‘You’ refers to different persons in many poems, ambiguous at places but simple and straightforward for everyone to understand. Though heartbreaking, this is an inspiring memoir.

  15. 5 out of 5

    McKenzie Richardson

    I received a copy of this book through Goodreads in exchange for an honest review.   To be honest, this was kind of a difficult book to read because of the subject matter as well as the overall flow of the book. The main components of the book are an autobiography, poetry, and photography.   While Finn is very open in the autobiography portion, the language is very simple and did not really interest me. It just felt like reading one horrible event after another. While I am glad she had a happy endi I received a copy of this book through Goodreads in exchange for an honest review.   To be honest, this was kind of a difficult book to read because of the subject matter as well as the overall flow of the book. The main components of the book are an autobiography, poetry, and photography.   While Finn is very open in the autobiography portion, the language is very simple and did not really interest me. It just felt like reading one horrible event after another. While I am glad she had a happy ending, the writing was not well-rounded and just read as a compilation of abuses and complaints. It is clear that Finn had a very hard life with multiple struggles and I am glad that she has overcome so much, but the overall message felt lackluster and was not written in a very inspiring way.   Also, Finn's main character is a princess, but the metaphor just ends there. She doesn't shape the story to fit into that framework. Instead she just refers to herself as a princess and her parents as royals. Writing in such a way didn't seem to bring anything to the book and felt a little awkward to me.   I did like the poetry section, especially the nature poems. While the poetry is pretty simple, Finn has very good descriptions regarding the natural world. I especially liked the newer poems as they felt more mature and reflective in comparison to those she wrote earlier in life.   The photography was nice, but all of the pictures were in black-and-white, which many times I think took away from the overall beauty of the subject. Some still looked good in black-and-white, but others, such as the flowers and sunset/sunrise pictures, felt like they were missing their most important qualities.   Overall, an good read. Simple and easy to get through, but not very well-rounded. The poetry was my favorite part, but by the end Finn seemed to push her opinions a little too hard such as messages of anti-materialism and living to the fullest, which may be good advice, but just felt a little too forceful to me.   Strong nature poetry though and some nice photography.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    This book was sent to me as a Good Reads giveaway, and the opinions are my own. This book can be seen as 3 elements, and because I felt so different about each, I will review it as if it has 3 sections. It begins with the story of Diane's life, her family, and the particular challenges she has faced. I enjoyed this section as I like reading about how other people cope with their hardships. Sometimes I feel empathy, sometimes sympathy, and sometimes I learn about myself in the process. Diane came a This book was sent to me as a Good Reads giveaway, and the opinions are my own. This book can be seen as 3 elements, and because I felt so different about each, I will review it as if it has 3 sections. It begins with the story of Diane's life, her family, and the particular challenges she has faced. I enjoyed this section as I like reading about how other people cope with their hardships. Sometimes I feel empathy, sometimes sympathy, and sometimes I learn about myself in the process. Diane came across as honest in her remembrance and is stronger than she thinks. The 2nd part involves her photography. The book itself has a grainy black & white photocopy look to it and I wish I could see her photos better - they look as if they would be stunning! The photos are primarily at the beginning of each chapter of poetry and I quite enjoyed them. The poetry, however, was not for me. And it is the largest section, hence the rating. Poetry is so skewed by personal taste that I feel uncomfortable judging it. I'm not a big poetry fan to begin with, and her poems are mostly about comparing life events to aspects of nature. I can picture her walking thru the woods or by the beach and sensing something relatable - which may make for great poetry, but it's not my thing. I don't think rain being absorbed by the ground relates to eternity, and I don't see wisdom in trees... If you enjoy contemporary poetry or compare nature to your personal life, you shod give this a go! If, like me, a rock is just a rock, you may want to pass.

  17. 4 out of 5

    New Apple Literary Services

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maria Karamintzou

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Rutherford

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joy Lo-Bamijoko

    This book left me wondering what writing novels should be. The author should have done well to write two separate books, one for the narration, and one for the poetry, instead of one. The narration part was also in two different styles. The first part of the Princess story was in the third person, all told, with very little showing, and the second part, was in the first person, with the author going through all the maladies she underwent. This was also all told with very little showing. The poet This book left me wondering what writing novels should be. The author should have done well to write two separate books, one for the narration, and one for the poetry, instead of one. The narration part was also in two different styles. The first part of the Princess story was in the third person, all told, with very little showing, and the second part, was in the first person, with the author going through all the maladies she underwent. This was also all told with very little showing. The poetry part could have very easily been a stand-alone. The Princess of the first part of the story went through some very troubling experiences with her family. Every child deserves to be loved! Even when her husband showed her much love and concern, she did not see it in time to appreciate it. He maladies, in fact, every human malady is believed to come from deep inside, and unless we own it and purge it, we will not get to the root of our maladies. This is the lesson from this story. I can see this book as an experiment in writing a novel.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amy Powers

  22. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

  23. 5 out of 5

    Janet

  24. 4 out of 5

    DLM Johnson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lizzie Chantree

  26. 4 out of 5

    Yecheilyah Ysrayl

  27. 5 out of 5

    D.L. Finn

  28. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  29. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

  31. 4 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  32. 5 out of 5

    Mary A.

  33. 5 out of 5

    Louise Carlson Stowell

  34. 5 out of 5

    Doreen Miller

  35. 5 out of 5

    DENISE

  36. 4 out of 5

    Erica

  37. 5 out of 5

    Pam Mooney

  38. 5 out of 5

    Joy Yerkie

  39. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Heare Watts

  40. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne

  41. 4 out of 5

    Ted

  42. 4 out of 5

    Rayjan Koehler

  43. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Rothman

  44. 5 out of 5

    Linda Buzard-Moffitt

  45. 5 out of 5

    Raymond Stone

  46. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Obrien

  47. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

  48. 4 out of 5

    Ron Frampton

  49. 4 out of 5

    D

  50. 4 out of 5

    Ann

  51. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

  52. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  53. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Miller

  54. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

  55. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Icebergsewell

  56. 4 out of 5

    Diana

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