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The Young Buglers: A Tale of the Peninsular War, by G.A. Henty ( Illustrated ): George Alfred Henty (Historical Fiction)

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The heroes of this historical fiction book are two orphaned brothers, Tom and Peter Scudamore. They tell the story of the Peninsular War how they see it through their eyes... George Alfred Henty (8 December 1832 - 16 November 1902) was a prolific English novelist and war correspondent. He is best known for his historical adventure stories that were popular in the late 19th The heroes of this historical fiction book are two orphaned brothers, Tom and Peter Scudamore. They tell the story of the Peninsular War how they see it through their eyes... George Alfred Henty (8 December 1832 - 16 November 1902) was a prolific English novelist and war correspondent. He is best known for his historical adventure stories that were popular in the late 19th century. His works include The Dragon & The Raven (1886), For The Temple (1888), Under Drake's Flag (1883) and In Freedom's Cause (1885).G. A. Henty was born in Trumpington, near Cambridge. He was a sickly child who had to spend long periods in bed. During his frequent illnesses he became an avid reader and developed a wide range of interests which he carried into adulthood. He attended Westminster School, London, and later Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, where he was a keen sportsman. He left the university early without completing his degree to volunteer for the Army Hospital Commissariat when the Crimean War began. He was sent to the Crimea and while there he witnessed the appalling conditions under which the British soldier had to fight. His letters home were filled with vivid descriptions of what he saw. His father was impressed by his letters and sent them to The Morning Advertiser newspaper which printed them. This initial writing success was a factor in Henty's later decision to accept the offer to become a special correspondent, the early name for journalists now better known as war correspondents....


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The heroes of this historical fiction book are two orphaned brothers, Tom and Peter Scudamore. They tell the story of the Peninsular War how they see it through their eyes... George Alfred Henty (8 December 1832 - 16 November 1902) was a prolific English novelist and war correspondent. He is best known for his historical adventure stories that were popular in the late 19th The heroes of this historical fiction book are two orphaned brothers, Tom and Peter Scudamore. They tell the story of the Peninsular War how they see it through their eyes... George Alfred Henty (8 December 1832 - 16 November 1902) was a prolific English novelist and war correspondent. He is best known for his historical adventure stories that were popular in the late 19th century. His works include The Dragon & The Raven (1886), For The Temple (1888), Under Drake's Flag (1883) and In Freedom's Cause (1885).G. A. Henty was born in Trumpington, near Cambridge. He was a sickly child who had to spend long periods in bed. During his frequent illnesses he became an avid reader and developed a wide range of interests which he carried into adulthood. He attended Westminster School, London, and later Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, where he was a keen sportsman. He left the university early without completing his degree to volunteer for the Army Hospital Commissariat when the Crimean War began. He was sent to the Crimea and while there he witnessed the appalling conditions under which the British soldier had to fight. His letters home were filled with vivid descriptions of what he saw. His father was impressed by his letters and sent them to The Morning Advertiser newspaper which printed them. This initial writing success was a factor in Henty's later decision to accept the offer to become a special correspondent, the early name for journalists now better known as war correspondents....

55 review for The Young Buglers: A Tale of the Peninsular War, by G.A. Henty ( Illustrated ): George Alfred Henty (Historical Fiction)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Angie Thompson

    Not my favorite Henty. Once we got to the war, things were interesting, and I liked being able to piece together bits of the Peninsular War that I had picked up on in other books (although this book started after the disastrous first campaign that I remembered from one of my favorites). However, the boys' behavior at the beginning of the book--for all the author's assurances that their jokes weren't mean-spirited--was absolutely appalling in some instances! Pulling a revenge prank that almost su Not my favorite Henty. Once we got to the war, things were interesting, and I liked being able to piece together bits of the Peninsular War that I had picked up on in other books (although this book started after the disastrous first campaign that I remembered from one of my favorites). However, the boys' behavior at the beginning of the book--for all the author's assurances that their jokes weren't mean-spirited--was absolutely appalling in some instances! Pulling a revenge prank that almost suffocates someone; injuring teachers; poisoning someone's dog; stealing property and smashing it, then returning it because "of course we wouldn't keep it"--um, no. Just no. It made it hard for me to root for them as heroes for a while. And then, after a lot of hemming and hawing about letting them into the army as buglers because they were much too young, after their first act of heroism, they're immediately made officers? Okay, I know the army's standards were different back then, and Henty's heroes are always promoted fast, but--that stretched the bounds of believability even for Henty. :P The other main thing that bothered me were some aspects related to their black servant, Sam. I understand the stereotyped dialogue, and I liked some portions of his characterization, but the bits of him pretending to be "the devil" bugged me a bit, even if there was a good purpose behind at least one of them. Also, I would have been willing to overlook the derogatory "Sambo" as the product of some unsympathetic soldiers, especially since he clearly resented it--but when he was called that a number of times in the narration, it was harder to write off. Overall, an interesting look at the Peninsular War, but not my favorite from the author. 2.5 stars Content--some derogatory names used for a black man (see above), including "n---", used mostly by himself and once by another; stereotyped dialogue; a man dresses up as "the devil," including stripping off his clothes, to frighten the superstitious Spanish; some dangerous pranks (see above); mentions of war, battles, blood, wounds, and deaths; violence, including murder and attempted murder

  2. 5 out of 5

    Katja Labonté

    3 stars. This is a fun read. It condenses the Peninsular War much more than the Terence O’Connor books. Despite the setting it’s pretty light-hearted, though there is one or two really exciting scenes. There is a much-repeated euphemism; some discrimination against Sam, their black soldier servant; drinking and smoking; and several instances when Sam plays being the Devil to frighten Spaniards, during one of which he is undressed. It isn’t my favourite Henty book simply because none of the chara 3 stars. This is a fun read. It condenses the Peninsular War much more than the Terence O’Connor books. Despite the setting it’s pretty light-hearted, though there is one or two really exciting scenes. There is a much-repeated euphemism; some discrimination against Sam, their black soldier servant; drinking and smoking; and several instances when Sam plays being the Devil to frighten Spaniards, during one of which he is undressed. It isn’t my favourite Henty book simply because none of the characters really call out to me, but it’s an humorous and exciting read. A Favourite Quote: “The British were now, however, safe in the position which they ought to have taken up before the advance of the French, and had General Craufurd obeyed his orders not to fight beyond the Coa, the lives of 306 of his gallant troops, including the officers, would have been saved.” A Favourite Beautiful Quote: “The first faint blush of daylight was in the east when they arrived at the cottage[.]” A Favourite Humorous Quote: “...if the head-master's favorite white poodle appeared dyed a deep blue, if Mr. Jones, the most unpopular master in the school, upon coming out of his door trod upon a quantity of tallow smeared all over the doorstep, and was laid up for a week in consequence, there was generally a strong suspicion that Tom and Peter Scudamore were concerned in the matter.”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jim Apps

    A little unusual and took a time to get used to the style, a fictional story within a factual book. Having read the two previous books it was very enjoyable and saved the problem of checking parts of the story to see which was fact and which fiction.

  4. 4 out of 5

    James Craddock

    Great book and great way to learn history

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ted Milroy

  7. 4 out of 5

    Altoidman

  8. 4 out of 5

    William

  9. 5 out of 5

    Electric Cowboy

  10. 5 out of 5

    Zackary Jessee

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rees Hovland

  12. 5 out of 5

    shaun jenkinson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jayce Nichols

  14. 5 out of 5

    David

  15. 4 out of 5

    John Komenda

  16. 5 out of 5

    RMK

  17. 4 out of 5

    Josiah Simon

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  20. 5 out of 5

    Douglasjr

  21. 4 out of 5

    Will

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

  24. 5 out of 5

    bhaiyalonda

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dr Zine K Parker

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Eddy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sean Meade

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Huisjen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Curtiss

  31. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy Burk

  32. 5 out of 5

    Greyson Rome

  33. 4 out of 5

    Philip

  34. 4 out of 5

    Gabe Mcdonald

  35. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

  36. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  37. 5 out of 5

    LesMiserables

  38. 5 out of 5

    Gina

  39. 5 out of 5

    Darin Perkins

  40. 5 out of 5

    peter birkinshaw

  41. 4 out of 5

    Jo Everett

  42. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  43. 4 out of 5

    WH

  44. 4 out of 5

    Beth

  45. 4 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

  46. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

  47. 4 out of 5

    Beth

  48. 5 out of 5

    Christina Dale

  49. 4 out of 5

    NB

  50. 4 out of 5

    Martin

  51. 4 out of 5

    Angelica Dantés

  52. 4 out of 5

    P.

  53. 4 out of 5

    J

  54. 4 out of 5

    Forge

  55. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia

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